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Global Cities and Immigrants

A Comparative Study of Chicago and Madrid

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Francisco Velasco Caballero and María de los Angeles Torres

Global Cities and Immigrants provides a detailed set of comparative case studies of the immigration policies of two global cities undergoing dramatic demographic changes. At the heart of this research are several theoretical questions. One is about the increased importance of municipal and local governments in a globalized world, particularly regarding immigrants. As the world global­izes and national governments attempt to tighten their grip, the failure of national policies to address the needs of new global situations encourages local governments to develop policies that resolve these new conditions. Although immigration is a federal policy in the United States and Spain, city and state governments have increasingly played a role in shaping both the enforcement of national laws and integration experiences of immigrants. This creates a local politics and indeed a legality of immigration that is strongly shaped by local views of economic, political, and security interests, as well as differing perceptions of immigrants’ rights and place in the polity.
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Chapter Seven: Immigrant Education Policies in the Chicago Metropolitan Area

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← 170 | 171 → CHAPTER SEVEN

Immigrant Education Policies in the Chicago Metropolitan Area

NILDA FLORES-GONZALEZ, UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT CHICAGO JULIO CAPELES, UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT CHICAGO CAROLINA CALVILLO, UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT CHICAGO RAJHAI WILSON, UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT CHICAGO IRMA OLMEDO, UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT CHICAGO



In the United States, schools are the premier integrative public institution, as they are mandated to educate all children, including immigrant children. As such, they are also the gatekeepers to immigrant incorporation and play an important role in the integration or further marginalization of immigrants. Despite its central role in the integration of immigrants, schools across the U.S. vary greatly in their approach and implementation of educational policy. Because policies are not uniform, there is great disparity in the educational experiences of immigrant students across schools, districts, and states. In this chapter, we examine how Chicago and several of its suburbs approach the education of their growing immigrant student population. First, we provide background on federal and state policies that address the education of immigrant students. Second, we examine district policies that lead to unequal educational opportunities for immigrant students across school districts in the Chicago Metropolitan Area.

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