Show Less
Restricted access

A Quiet Revolution

Some Social and Religious Perspectives on the Nigerian Crisis

Series:

Joseph F. Mali

In A Quiet Revolution: Some Social and Religious Perspectives on the Nigerian Crisis, Joseph F. Mali argues that contrary to popular belief, corruption and failed leadership are not at the heart of the Nigerian crisis. Corruption and misrule, though they have done a terrible harm to the Nigerian society, are in fact byproducts of something much more sinister in the same way that smoke is the byproduct of fire. The real trouble with Nigeria, Mali puts it bluntly, is a lifestyle of profound selfishness, which the people and their leaders have in common. The nation is still bleeding because of this evil. Unless Nigerians cure this «disease», Mali maintains, no system of government is likely to succeed in Nigeria. In vain do Nigerians seek political solutions as long as selfishness remains their credo! Since Nigeria’s problem is moral in nature, Mali insists, the remedy must also be ethical in character. Accordingly, he proposes «A Quiet Revolution» as a cure for Nigeria’s ailment. This revolution is not a silent coup to overthrow the Nigerian government. It is not «a French-styled rebellion in which the masses on the streets, and peasants in the country put an end to centuries of absolute monarchy». Rather, the «Quiet Revolution» is an interior change; an individual transformation. As long as this change has not taken place, Mali declares, it will be difficult to repair and restore Nigeria.
Show Summary Details
Restricted access

Chapter 5. A Quiet Revolution

Extract

← 64 | 65 → · 5 ·

A QUIET REVOLUTION

By now it should be clear that Nigeria’s real problem is ethical in nature. Consequently, I shall propose a moral solution.1 The cure I am recommending is a quiet revolution. By a quiet revolution I do not mean a silent coup to overthrow the Nigerian government. Nor am I advocating a French-style rebellion in which the masses on the streets and peasants in the country put an end to centuries of absolute monarchy. It does not refer to economic reforms either, like the ones undertaken by the military and civilian governments in Nigeria. The quiet revolution I am advocating is an interior change, that is, the transformation of each individual. As long as this change has not taken place, no one will be able to repair and restore Nigeria, even with a bloody revolution.

In 1983, General Muhammadu Buhari took over power from Shehu Shagari and launched his famous “war against indiscipline.” He aggressively went after corrupt politicians, including Umaru Dikko, the former minister of transport. Dikko was widely believed to have used his political position to enrich himself. When Buhari seized power, Dikko fled to London and became one of the most wanted fugitives sought by the Buhari administration. The British government foiled the plot to fly Dikko in a crate from London to Nigeria.

Buhari’s extreme measures tackling corruption, among other things, prompted General Ibrahim Babangida to remove him from power in 1985. ← 65...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.