Show Less

The Rise of Bardolatry in the Restoration

Paratexts of Shakespearean Adaptations and other Texts 1660–1737

Enrico Scaravelli

This book explores from a new perspective the adaptations of Shakespeare in the Restoration, and how they contributed to the rise of the cult of the National Poet in an age where his reputation was not yet consolidated. Adaptations are fully independent cultural items, whose paratexts play a crucial role in the development of Bardolatry; their study initially follows seminal works of Bakhtin and Genette, but the main theoretical background is anthropology, with the groundbreaking theories of Mary Douglas.
The many voices that feature the paratexts of the adaptations and the other texts, such as those of John Dryden, Thomas Betterton, William Davenant, Nahum Tate, John Dennis, and many others, create a composite choir where the emerging sacrality of the cult of the Bard was just one of the tunes, in an age when Shakespeare has not yet become Shakespeare.

Prices

Show Summary Details
Restricted access

Contents

Extract

Acknowledgments .................................................................................9 Preface.................................................................................................11 1 The Theoretical Background ...........................................................13 1.1 Bardolatry ..............................................................................13 1.1.1 George Bernard Shaw and the coinage of the term ....................................................................13 1.1.2 Early Attestations, Dryden, 1769 Shakespeare Jubilee ............................................13 1.1.3 Victorian Age, Twentieth Century, and Beyond ...........16 1.2 Paratext ..................................................................................20 1.2.1 Origin and Relevance of the Term ...............................20 1.2.2 Definition .....................................................................21 1.2.3 Parts of the Paratext: Peritext and Epitext ...................24 1.2.4 Key Peritextual Categories ...........................................26 1.2.5 Prologues, Epilogues, Curtain Raisers, and Afterpieces.............................................................29 1.2.6 Prologues and Epilogues of Restoration Theater ........32 1.3 Adaptation ..............................................................................34 1.3.1 Alteration and Adaptation: OED and Patrice Pavis .................................................................34 1.3.2 Martha Tuck Rozett......................................................37 1.3.3 Ruby Cohn ...................................................................37 1.3.4 Linda Hutcheon ...........................................................38 1.3.5 Daniel Fischlin and Mark Fortier .................................40 1.3.6 Margaret Jane Kidnie ...................................................40 1.4 Linguistics and Anthropology: Mikhail Bakhtin and Mary Douglas ........................................................................42 1.4.1 Introduction .................................................................42 1.4.2 Mikhail Bakhtin: “The Discourse in the Novel” ..........44 1.4.3 Mary Douglas, Purity and Danger ..............................46 6 2 Paratext I: The Peritext ....................................................................55 2.1 Publisher’s Peritext: Title Pages and Titles .............................55 2.1.1 Introductory Remarks ..................................................55 2.1.2 Title Pages and Titles ...................................................56 2.2 Prefatorial Peritext: Dedicatory Epistles, Prefaces, Reader’s Advisories, Theoretical Essays ................................57 2.2.1 Introductory Remarks ..................................................57 2.2.2 1670–1687: From Davenant and Dryden’s The Tempest to Ravenscroft’s Titus Andronicus ...........59 2.2.3 1700–1703: An Historical Play and Three Comedies ...........................................................71 2.2.4 1720–1723: Historical Plays and Roman Plays ...........75 2.2.5 Conclusions .................................................................81 2.3 Dramatic Peritext: Prologues and Epilogues ..........................82 2.3.1 Introductory Remarks ..................................................82 2.3.2 The Tempest; Troilus and Cressida; The History and Fall of Caius Marius; The Misery of...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.