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Corpus-based studies on language varieties

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Edited By Francisco Alonso Almeida, Laura Cruz García and Víctor González-Ruiz

This volume brings together a number of corpus-based studies dealing with language varieties. These contributions focus on contemporary lines of research interests, and include language teaching and learning, translation, domain-specific grammatical and textual phenomena, linguistic variation and gender, among others. Corpora used in these studies range from highly specialized texts, including earlier scientific texts, to regional varieties. Under the umbrella of corpus linguistics, scholars also apply other distinct methodological approaches to their data in order to offer new insights into old and new topics in linguistics and applied linguistics. Another important contribution of this book lies in the obvious didactic implications of the results obtained in the individual chapters for domain-based language teaching.
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Introduction

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The use of corpus linguistics (CL) methodology is rapidly expanding as seen in the number of studies published fairly recently in collections, e.g. Gather (2014), Kerremans (2015), Leńko-Szymańska and Boulton (2015). This published material encompasses new ways of looking at data, old and present-day, and offers fresh insight to current linguistic issues. This is possible because research carried out on large amounts of data may lend more significant and accurate conclusions. In this context, CL stands as an ideal tool to detect and assess variation, and even change, in different varieties of language.

This volume is an example of the interaction between CL and language varieties. It contains ten papers, which focus on the analysis of language in different communicative and professional settings, but also embraces research on diaphasic and diatopic variation. These studies evince contemporary lines of research interests, and include language teaching and learning, translation, domain-specific grammatical and textual phenomena, linguistic variation and gender, among others, as we shall describe in the following paragraphs.

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