Show Less

Dislocated Identities

Exile and the Self as (M)other in the Writing of Reinaldo Arenas

Series:

Wendy McMahon

This book offers a significant, original and timely contribution to the study of one of the most important and notorious Latin American authors of the twentieth century: Reinaldo Arenas. The text engages with the many extraordinary intersections created between Arenas’ writing, the autobiographical construction of the literary subject and the exilic condition.
Through focusing on texts written on the island of Cuba and in exile, the author analyses the ways in which Arenas’ writing emblemises a complex process of identification with, and rejection of, his homeland – always an imagined place and which is, as the place of his origins, intrinsically related to the maternal. She examines how the maternal and the motherland are conflated and how the narrator-protagonists’ identification is always in relation to, and dependent upon, this dominant motif. The book also explores the extent to which Arenas’ writing is a tortuous attempt to escape from this dominance and to free himself and his writing from the ties that bind him to the mother and the motherland, and shows that Arenas suffered the exilic condition long before his move to the United States in 1980 as part of the Mariel exodus.

Prices

Show Summary Details
Restricted access

Conclusion - The Final End: The Final Rewrite 237

Extract

Conclusion The Final End: The Final Rewrite Death is the greatest hope of human beings, their only hope of being human. — Maurice Blanchot1 The Last Act Reinaldo Arenas spent his lifetime in a succession of varying exiles: exile from the social an...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.