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From Christ’s Death to Jesus’ Life

A Critical Reinterpretation of Prevailing Theories of the Cross- Translated by Joyce J. Michael

Jakub S. Trojan

This book began to materialize in the 1960s and 1970s during clandestine seminars organized by the author for Czechoslovak thinkers who dared to ponder theological questions during the communist era. It therefore provides a revealing glimpse of some of the issues that were of concern to people living under the domination of both the Nazi and communist regimes. This aspect of the book is evident in its emphasis on questions of theodicy which are raised by the idea that Jesus’ death was initiated by God.
At the same time, the book is very much concerned with contemporary issues. By analyzing traditional understandings of the cross held by a number of prominent theologians, the author seeks to address the fact that classic theories of the atonement do not speak in a compelling way to today’s secularized, post-Christian milieu. After examining perspectives that place central emphasis on the salvific consequence of Jesus’ death, the author presents his own views regarding the significance that Jesus’ life may have for the present age. He challenges his readers to venture a living interpretation of Scripture and explores the possibility that God’s plan of salvation is most faithfully represented by the compassion and justice that Jesus modelled throughout his entire life.

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Acknowledgements xii

Extract

Acknowledgements The Czech version of this book was published in Prague by Oikoymenh Publishing House in 2005 under the title Ježíšův příběh – výzva pro nás. The author would like to thank Professor Jürgen Moltmann for kindly granting permission to quote extensively in chapters 8 and 9 of this book from Der gekreuzigte Gott (Munich: Christian Kaiser Verlag, 1972). English version: The Crucified God, trans. R. A. Wilson and John Bowden (New York: Harper & Row, 1974).

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