Show Less

Secular Health and Sacred Belief?

A Study of Religion and Mental Illness in Modern Irish Society

Áine Lorié

Social exclusion is one of the most significant problems facing individuals with mental illness in contemporary Ireland. In the era of the growing secular medical-industrial complex and its alienating effects, it is important to strengthen confidence in mental health services that promote social inclusion, specifically for stigmatised groups. As mainstream facilities remain attached to a biomedical framework, religious outlets operating in the voluntary sector may serve as an alternative option.
This book examines religion’s therapeutic potential, concentrating on aspects of Catholicism as manifestations of Max Weber’s prosocial concept of ‘brotherliness’. This line of enquiry is approached both on a macro level, looking at institutional religion, and on a micro level, looking at personal beliefs. The author examines such issues as the power of the institutional church in disseminating collectively orientated ideas; the public response to mental illness in Ireland over the past two centuries; the tendency within the field of psychology to pathologise belief systems and instrumentalise religious coping; and processes of secularisation, socialisation and ritualisation, which can either assist in or hinder the subjective adaptation of religious ideas. The theoretical arguments are contextualised by in-depth interviews with members of the «peerled» mental health group GROW.

Prices

Show Summary Details
Restricted access

Index

Extract

Allocentric 40, 215, 233, 242, 245, 247, 250 Allopathic treatment or medication 36–37, 51, 71, 80, 83 Asylum/s committal 28, 31, 36 deinstitutionalisation 50–53 English 26, 30 Irish 30, 32–38, 40, 44–47, 62, 251 management 6, 7, 34, 43 moral 26, 29, 31, 33–35, 37, 38 poor law 26, 30, 32–33 Berger, Peter 48, 113, 116, 118, 122, 130, 133, 138, 140, 145, 152 Brotherliness or brotherly love Catholic/Catholicism 39–43, 46–47, 71, 114, 117–118, 120, 129 definition 39–40, 111–113 Protestant/ Protestantism 17, 19, 40, 114 Weber 5, 18, 39–40, 112–114, 133 Calvinism invisible elect or predestination 17–20 Catholic ethos asylums 45–47 common good 40, 120 definition 39–40 education see Catholic socialisation and education medical sphere 43–44, 47–50 mental health and illness 65, 71 poverty 17, 43–45, 71 public policy 41–43 “third sector” 53–57 Catholicism af filiation in Ireland 5, 121 allocentrism 40, 133 common good 40, 114, 115–120, 129 principle of subsidiarity 41 unbrotherliness 117–118 Catholic socialisation and educa- tion 119–134, 127–128 Charity 17, 24–26, 40, 41, 43, 113 Civil society voluntary or “third sector” see Catho- lic ethos “third sector” Dangerous lunacy or criminal insan- ity 29, 34–38 Dangerous Lunatic (Ireland) Act (1838) 36 Degeneration model 26, 28–29, 38 De Valera, Eamon 39–44 Doctor–patient relationship filter back process 82 Morgan’s four models 87 “sick role” 85–87 take back...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.