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The Spanish of the Northern Peruvian Andes

A Sociohistorical and Dialectological Account

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Luis Andrade Ciudad

This book analyses a set of rarely described regional Spanish varieties spoken throughout much of the northern Peruvian Andes (Cajamarca, La Libertad and Ancash) from a sociohistorical and dialectological perspective. What are the main dialectological features of these varieties? Are these features the same ones that shape southern Andean Spanish, a variety formed mainly through contact with Quechua and Aymara? Which of these features are distinctly outcomes of contact with Culle, the main substrate language of the region, which was mentioned in colonial and postcolonial documents but is now extinct? How are these features linked to the postcolonial history of the region, marked by the Catholic evangelization enterprise and an «economy of plundering» based on agriculture, weaving and mining? Thorough consideration of these matters allows the author to critically assess the standard notion in Hispanic linguistics that considers Andean Spanish as a single, homogeneous code. The study sheds new light on how the regional varieties of Spanish in America were shaped over time and proposes ways of delving into language history in postcolonial contexts, where a written European language has been superimposed on a set of native codes previously lacking written traditions.
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HISTORICAL SOCIOLINGUISTICS

Studies on Language and Society in the Past

SERIES EDITORS

Nils Langer Stephan Elspaß Joseph Salmons Wim Vandenbussche

The interdisciplinary field of Historical Sociolinguistics seeks to reveal the impact of language development on society and the role of individuals and society in the changing forms and usage of language. This book series is aimed at sociolinguists and social historians who are keen to publish studies on the social history of languages, the interaction of linguistic practices and society, and the sociological significance of linguistic variation with a historical dimension. The purpose of the series is to provide empirically supported studies that will challenge and advance current language historiographies, which often continue to present the history of particular languages as necessarily leading to the creation of a standard or prestige variety. Of particular interest are topics such as the following: language myths and language ideology, historical multilingualism and the formation of nationstates, the sociolinguistics of minority and regional languages, the rise of urban vernaculars, immigrants and their languages, the role of prescriptive grammarians, and the social history of pidgins and creoles.

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