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New Critical Perspectives on Franco-Irish Relations

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Edited By Anne Goarzin

This collection of critical essays proposes new and original readings of the relationship between French and Irish literature and culture. It seeks to re-evaluate, deconstruct and question artistic productions and cultural phenomena while pointing to the potential for comparative analysis between the two countries. The volume covers the French wine tradition, the Irish rebellion and the weight of religious and cultural tradition in both countries, seeking to examine these familiar topics from unconventional perspectives. Some contributors offer readings of established figures in Irish and French literature, from Flann O’Brien to Albert Camus; others highlight writers who have been left outside the critical frame, including Sydney Owenson, Jean Giono and Katherine Cecil Thurston. Finally, the volume explores areas such as sport, education, justice and alternative religious practices, generating unexpected and thought-provoking cultural connections between France and Ireland.
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Challenging the Virilian Doxa: Of Flow, Speed and Trajectory in Allan Gillis’s Poetry

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Much time is spent updating personal and professional profiles online as well as websites these days or communicating through social networks and apps while at the same time being confronted with incessant demands for immediate replies, and expecting immediate service or instant interaction ourselves. Sometimes frustration is around the corner when network efficiency fails to meet our expectations. Common opinion has it – albeit on the side of conservatives – that the contemporary abundance of media and computer-generated interactions has had a damaging effect on relationships and creativity. That idea has a whiff of lingering nostalgia for a more authentic, not to say pre-lapsarian, pre-Internet life. Philosopher Paul Virilio for instance, laments the negative human consequences resulting from the distancing effects brought about by cyberspace involvement:

Together with the build-up of information superhighways we are facing a new phenomenon: loss of orientation. A fundamental loss of orientation complementing and concluding the societal liberalization and the deregulation of financial markets whose nefarious effects are well-known. A duplication of sensible reality, into reality and virtuality, is in the making. A stereo-reality of sorts threatens. A total loss of the bearings of the individual looms large. To exist, is to exist in situ, here and now, hic et nunc. This is precisely what is being threatened by cyberspace and instantaneous, globalized information flows.1 ← 127 | 128 →

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