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Rethinking Orient

In Search of Sources and Inspirations


Adam Bednarczyk, Magdalena Kubarek and Maciej Szatkowski

The contributions in this book address a vast variety of questions concerning the sources and mutual inspirations in Oriental and European literatures. The authors discuss selected texts from both historical and synchronic perspectives. They reveal and scrutinise the sedimented layers in their search for the original as well as for the repetitive and universal. The book revolves around the creative reception of one’s own cultural heritage and of works which originated in other cultures.

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Indian Inspirations in the Works of the Slovak Writer Herman Klačko (Róbert Gáfrik)


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Róbert Gáfrik

Slovak Academy of Sciences Slovakia

Indian Inspirations in the Works of the Slovak Writer Herman Klačko*

Abstract: Slovakia did not participate in the boom of various Orientalist disciplines in the 19th and the 20th centuries. Especially Indic studies could hardly develop in the country during this time. However, despite that, India captured the imagination of several Slovak writers. Herman Klačko (1913–1996), who served as a Czechoslovak consul in Bombay in 1945–1948, was an important organizer of Oriental studies in Slovakia in the 1950s and the 1960s. His creative work was profusely inspired by Indian culture. He authored several India-related books, including two novels Vyšívaná črievica (The Embroidered Shoe, 1956) and Ráno v Bombaji (The Morning in Bombay, 1969). Although Herman Klačko is a writer of minor importance, his writing represent a significant attempt to popularize India and Indian themes to Slovak readers. The paper answers the question how Klačko presented India and its cultural situation to his readers, what image he created and what strategies he employed. Moreover, it is also a contribution to the little researched problem of representation of India in the literatures of the former socialist East-Central Europe.

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