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Synergy I: Marginalisation, Discrimination, Isolation and Existence in Literature

Edited By A.Nejat Töngür and Yıldıray Çevik

Studies on the distinguished works of English and American literature of various genres like poetry, plays and fiction are included in this book focusing on and around the central themes of “Marginalisation, Discrimination, Isolation, and Existence.” The aim of the book is to investigate the issues of “Marginalisation, Discrimination, Isolation, and Existence” within the frameworks of gender, colonization, multiculturalism, religion, race, generation gap, politics, technology, immigration, and class.

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VII: THE ETHICS OF SCIENCE AND THE INVISIBLE MAN THROUGH SOCIAL AND CULTURAL SCRIPTS AND TRANSACTIONAL ANALYSIS (Timuçin Buğra EDMAN, Hacer GÖZEN, Yusuf KASİMİ)

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Timuçin Buğra EDMAN, Hacer GÖZEN, Yusuf KASİMİ

Abstract: Just as the first entrance of ‘the stranger’ into Iping ignited the wick of a series of enigmatic events in The Invisible Man, so indeed does H.G. Wells’ extraordinary dream world continue to captivate millions. While the limits of science today can be demarcated only through the human imagination, it was not all that different back in 1897, when this science fiction novel was first published. Wells’ novel has in fact revived a subject that had been widely discussed in previous centuries which does perhaps fall under the shadow of alchemy. Much of what we know today that is possible through technology allegedly seemed to be conceivable primarily through alchemy or black magic before the positive leap forward in the sciences. Nevertheless, philosophers such as Sir Thomas More and Sir Francis Bacon may have raised the first serious concerns about science and ethics. The intersection of ethics and science is the core contact point, whereby the purpose and limits of science create a mutual entity. Especially recently, the ethics of science has been a topic of discussion following serious trepidations. The ‘abode’ of science in human life is undoubtedly undeniable. However, when massacres such as Hiroshima and Nagasaki are commemorated, it becomes necessary to reinvigorate the limits of science. As a matter of fact, “during the past decade, scientists, laypeople, and politicians have become increasingly aware of the importance of ethics in scientific research. Several trends...

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