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Sino-Christian Theology

A Theological Qua Cultural Movement in Contemporary China

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Edited By Pan-chiu Lai and Jason Lam

«Sino-Christian theology» usually refers to an intellectual movement emerged in Mainland China since the late 1980s. The present volume aims to provide a self-explaining sketch of the historical development of this theological as well as cultural movement. In addition to the analyses on the theoretical issues involved and the articulations of the prospect, concrete examples are also offered to illustrate the characteristics of the movement.
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The Paradigm Shift: From Chinese Theology to Sino-Christian Theology – A Case Study on Liu Xiaofeng 139

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The Paradigm Shift: From Chinese Theology to Sino-Christian Theology – A Case Study on Liu Xiaofeng CHIN Ken-Pa Christianity as a Barbarous “Foreigner” “For Jews demand signs and Greeks look for wisdom, but we proclaim Christ crucified, a stumbling block to Jews and foolishness to Gentiles, but to those who are called, Jews and Greeks alike, Christ the power of God and the wisdom of God. For the foolishness of God is wiser than human wisdom, and the weakness of God is stronger than human strength.” (I Corinthians 1: 22-25) If St. Paul had known, besides Jews and Greeks, the existence of the Chinese, the paragraph might have been reformulated as such: For Jews demand signs, Greeks look for wisdom, and the Chinese honor morality, but we proclaim Christ crucified, a stumbling block to Jews, foolishness to Gentiles, and savagery to the Chinese, but to those who are called, Jews, Greeks and the Chinese alike, Christ the power of God, the wisdom of God, and the nobleness of God. For the foolishness of God is wiser than human wisdom, the weakness of God is stronger than human strength, and the savagery of God is nobler than human civilization. Though it was first introduced into Chinese context one and a half century ago, Christianity has not successfully settled down in Chinese culture and still remains a “foreign religion” (yang jiao). It is intolerable for the Chinese that this Western religion rejects any forms of adaptation: “indigenization”, “Sini- fication”, “contextualization”, “inculturation”, or “integration...

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