Show Less

Quantitative Vulnerability Assessment for Economic Systems

Vulnerability and the Process of Recovery for Households and Companies in Phang-Nga and Phuket Provinces in Thailand

Series:

Philipp Willroth

In 2004 tsunami waves caused huge economic losses along the coastline of Southern Thailand. These resulted from direct damages and the following economic downturn. This study investigates the factors that led to this vulnerable situation. One of the greatest challenges in vulnerability research is the quantification. To answer this question, a wide database has been used, encompassing highly accurate remote sensing data, quantitative surveys and qualitative focus group discussion data. These data have been integrated in a structural equation model to reproduce factors and relations leading to the hazard induced effects and the capabilities to cope with. The model showed that the impact was almost completely compensated for by households’ and companies’ internal and external resilience capabilities.

Prices

Show Summary Details
Restricted access

List of tables

Extract

Table 1: Categorisation of external shocks .................................. 24 Table 2: Parameter combinations to predict Tsunami run-up heights ........................................................................... 38 Table 3: Parameters of physical sensitivity for study communities .................................................................. 40 Table 4: Potential indicators for household vulnerability ............ 47 Table 5: Potential indicators for company vulnerability ............. 52 Table 6: Number of interviewed households and companies in the study areas ........................................................... 63 Table 7: Participants of focus group discussions ......................... 71 Table 8: Characteristics of structural equation modelling approaches ..................................................................... 76 Table 9: Criteria for outer model specification ........................... 81 Table 10: Goodness of fit for the outer model ............................... 83 Table 11: Goodness of fit for the inner model ............................... 84 Table 12: Accuracy of automatic building classification .............. 87 Table 13: Economic key facts for the six southern provinces ....... 94 Table 14: Tourism revenue in million € ........................................ 97 Table 15: Household income and poverty rate in the southern provinces in 2004 and 2007 .......................................... 98 Table 16: Financial impact on tsunami-affected countries .......... 100 Table 17: Annual change in GPP/GDP in relation to the previous year in the tsunami-affected provinces ......... 102 Table 18: Damage to livelihoods in Euro .................................... 104 Table 19: Damage to the housing sector ..................................... 105 Table 20: Financial assistance provided by the Thai government .................................................................. 109 Table 21: Gross provincial product indexed to 2004 .................. 116 x List of tables Table 1: Categorisation of external shocks .................................. 24 Table 2: Parameter combinations to predict Tsunami run-up heights ........................................................................... 38 Table 3: Parameters of physical sensitivity for study communities .................................................................. 40 Table 4: Potential indicators for household vulnerability ............ 47 Table 5: Potential indicators for company vulnerability ............. 52...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.