Show Less

Eminent Lives in Twentieth-Century Science and Religion

With chapters on: Rachel Carson, Charles A. Coulson, Theodosius Dobzhansky, Arthur S. Eddington, Albert Einstein, Ronald A. Fisher, Julian Huxley, Pascual Jordan, Robert A. Millikan, Ivan P. Pavlov, Michael I. Pupin, Abdus Salam, Edward O. Wilson

Edited By Nicolaas A. Rupke

Can science and religion coexist in harmony? Or is conflict inevitable? In this volume an international team of distinguished scholars addresses these enduring yet urgent questions by examining the lives of thirteen eminent twentieth-century scientists whose careers were marked by the interaction of science and religion: Rachel Carson, Charles A. Coulson, Theodosius Dobzhansky, Arthur S. Eddington, Albert Einstein, Ronald A. Fisher, Julian Huxley, Pascual Jordan, Robert A. Millikan, Ivan P. Pavlov, Michael I. Pupin, Abdus Salam, and Edward O. Wilson. The richly empirical studies show a diversity of creative engagements between science and religion that defy efforts to set the two at odds.

Prices

Show Summary Details
Restricted access

PETER J. BOWLER Julian Huxley (1887-1975) 215

Extract

Julian Huxley: Religion without Revelation PETER J. BOWLER At first sight it might seem incongruous to include Julian Huxley (1887- 1975) in a volume on science and religion. Apart from his ancestry (grandson of "Darwin's bulldog" Thomas Henry Huxley (1825-95), he was himself an active Opponent of organized religion who rejected the idea of a personal God. A longstanding member of the Rationalist Press Association, he wrote extensively in support of a philosophy of scientific humanism in which all values were to be defined without reference to the transcendental. He wrote a successful popular account of modern biology in conjunction with that arch Opponent of formal religion, H. G. Wells (1866-1946). And yet, as many scholars have pointed out, Huxley was never a materialist, and his sense of values was shaped by themes that were widely assumed to be congruent with the more liberal forms of Christianity. He knew, interacted with, and was influenced by, many religious thinkers. His vision of evolutionism was driven by a sense of progress which allowed him to believe, in the end, that the universe did advance toward a goal defined by what humanity had become, and could become in the future. As the title of one of his books put it, what he wanted was Religion without Revelation. lt was not, perhaps, what the orthodox would consider religion, but in his eyes it was a replacement for that older belief-system that would respect the emotions which had always driven people to look for a...

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.