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Archetypes in Literatures and Cultures

Cultural and Regional Studies- In Collaboration with Sevinj Bakhysh and Izabella Horvath

Edited By Rahilya Geybullayeva

The formation of new countries after the collapse of the Soviet Union and the Eastern European block necessarily brings about an increased awareness of national identity and has given rise to more urgent attempts to define national literary and cultural facts. Among the facts to be determined are the circulation of similar cultural motifs, situations, symbols, plots, genres, words, and rituals. Such a situation gives rise to questions concerning the relationship between things that were constructed over centuries and relatively new archetypal plots and situations created by different authors, developed in different periods and in national literatures. For example, how does translation influence the migration of plots? Does the blurring of borders between sources and re-interpretations make it difficult to distinguish the original and the «kidnapped» texts? The forms of archetypes have changed and continue to change, creating a hyper-text. Taking these things into consideration, the question arises: «Where are the borders between an original text, influences, and plagiarism?»

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Preface

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The idea for the project “Archetypes in Literatures and Cultures” as well as the idea for the previous projects “Literary Contexts” (2006), “Stereotypes in Literatures and Cultures” (2008), hosted by Baku Slavic University, arose in hopes of streng- thening discussions about We and Others, Mine and Others’ in culture and art, which are supposedly significant components of national identity. This idea also was realised at the “Cuisine: Taste of Others” conference (2010), launched jointly by Prof. Didier Francfort and Dr. Denis Saillard, and hosted by Khazar University, Baku. The formation of new countries after the collapse of the Soviet Union and the Eastern European block necessarily brought about an increased awareness of the problem of national identity and has given rise to more urgent attempts to define national literary and cultural facts. Among the matters to be discussed in this context are the circulation of similar cultural motifs, situations, symbols, plots, genres, words, and rituals. Such a situation gives rise to questions concerning both things that were constructed over centuries and relatively new archetypal plots and situations created by different authors, in different periods and in na- tional literatures. For example, how does translation influence the migration of plots? Does the blurring of borders between sources and re-interpretations make it difficult to distinguish the original and the “kidnapped” texts? The forms of archetypes have changed and continue to change, creating a hyper-text. Taking these things into consideration, the question arises: “Where are the borders bet- ween an original text, influence,...

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