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Concepts of a Culturally Guided Philosophy of Science

Contributions from Philosophy, Medicine and Science of Psychotherapy

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Edited By Fengli Lan, Friedrich G. Wallner and Andreas Schulz

From the beginning, Constructive Realism has been a culturally orientated philosophy of science by the introduction of the concept of lifeworld. This book brings together contributions from the field of philosophy, Chinese medicine and the science of psychotherapy. The authors discuss the relation of Constructive Realism and culture or rather the concept of science under the aspect of cultural dependency. Since the beginning of the new century the manifold research on Chinese Medicine offered concrete examples for a cultural dependency of science. Thereby, the book shows the rare or even unique situation that philosophy became concrete.

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Fengli Lan & Friedrich G. Wallner: The Concept of Health in Chinese Culture: The Playing of A Piece of Mild, Smooth Symphony in the Nature

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10 José A. López Cerezo & José Luis Luján A Philosophical Approach to the Nature of Risk .............................................. 161 Michael Franck Verfremdung der Verfremdung - Die Verfremdung Brechts und des Konstruktiven Realismus im Vergleich ............................................... 181 Andreas Schulz Radikaler Konstruktivismus und Konstruktiver Realismus - Eine Gegenüberstellung der epistemologischen Positionen von Glasersfeld und Wallner ............................................................................. 263 On the Authors / Über die Autoren ................................................................... 335 11 Fengli Lan & Friedrich G. Wallner The Concept of Health in Chinese Culture: The Playing of A Piece of Mild, Smooth Symphony in the Nature Abstract Based on investigation of the etymologies of some sinograms - Jian �, Kang�, Ping �, Yue �, Yao � and He � and related discussions from Huang Di Nei Jing, we conclude that the state of being healthy in Chinese culture is dynamic harmonious functioning of all the component parts of a being (composed of body and mind) with the nature, just like the playing of a piece of mild, smooth symphony in the nature. He who has health, has hope; and he who has hope has everything. (Arabian Saying) Diverse cultures have diverse worldviews, which accounts for the differences in how people of different cultural and ethnic backgrounds shape their views of health and well-being in both the physical and spiritual realm. Dualistic (or di- chotomy) or holistic worldviews and mechanistic or non-mechanistic worldviews also account for cultural perceptions of everything from the con- cepts of health, well-being and illness (or disease), the causes (or origins) of ill- nesses, to prevention and treatment of the illnesses....

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