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Dissent! Refracted

Histories, Aesthetics and Cultures of Dissent

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Edited By Ben Dorfman

This collection of essays addresses the ongoing problem of dissent from a broad range of disciplinary perspectives: political philosophy, intellectual history, literary studies, aesthetics, architectural history and conceptualizations of the political past. Taking a global perspective, the volume examines the history of dissent both inside and outside the West, through events in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries both nearer to our own times as well as more distant, and through a range of styles reflecting how contested and pressing the problem of dissent in fact is. Drawing on a range of authors and international problematics, the contributions discuss the multiple ways in which we refract memories of dissent in cultural, historical and aesthetic context. It also discusses the diverse ideas, images and phenomena we use to do so.
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“But That is Perhaps Why I Can Talk of Where I Want to Be without Always Being Dragged Back to My Starting Point”: Rethinking and Re(-)Membering Czech and Slovak Histories of Violence and Dissidence through the Historical “Infranovel” (Verita Sriratana)

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Verita Sriratana “But That is Perhaps Why I Can Talk of Where I Want to Be without Always Being Dragged Back to My Starting Point”: Rethinking and Re(-)Membering Czech and Slovak Histories of Violence and Dissidence through the Historical “Infranovel” Abstract In HHhH, a historical “infranovel” published in French in 2010 and translated into English in 2013, Laurent Binet’s conscious “otherness” to Central Europe, particularly Czech and Slovak cultures and histories, sets him “free to dream” of a different place/time and free to imagine as well as introduce ghosts of the obscure and unknown “subaltern” involved, thereby adding critical dimensions to the postmodernist rethinking and re(-) membering of the region’s histories of violence and dissidence. From Fritz Lang’s 1943 film entitled Hangmen Also Die! to Lidice (2011), and from Jiří Weil’s Na střeše je Mendelssohn (Mendelssohn Is on the Roof [1960]) to Alan Burgess’s Seven Men at Daybreak (1960) and Gerald Brennan’s Resistance (2012), Operation Anthropoid, as well as the merciless Nazi reprisals, one of the darkest chapters of Czech and Slovak histories of oppression and resistance, has been portrayed and recounted in a number of films and literary works. Though these cinematic and literary portrayals and adaptations of the assassination in Prague on 27 May 1942 of Reinhard Heydrich, Reichsprotektor of the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia, tend to be regarded as classic indisputable resources and references in their own right, I argue in this paper that the representation of histories of violence and...

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