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Multilateralism in Global Governance

Formal and Informal Institutions

Edited By Assel Tutumlu and Gaye Güngör

The aim of this edited volume is to bring back multilateralism in global governance research by going beyond the state-centric and formal models of multilateralism of the 1990s and deeper into the informal private agents and structures of global governance. The volume is situated within the third generation scholarly research tying together disparate efforts from various disciplines, such as International Relations, Public Administration, International Law and International Political Economy under the overarching theme of multilateralism approached from the three different angles: normative dimensions of global governance, issue-areas, such as migration and international trade, as well as the limits of multilateralism.
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“The Tensions between Internal and External Multilateralism in the Case Law of the Court of Justice of the European Union Concerning International Agreements” Pola Cebulak

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Pola Cebulak1

The Tensions between Internal and External Multilateralism in the Case Law of the Court of Justice of the European Union Concerning International Agreements

Introduction

The European Union’s (EU) commitment to multilateralism is enshrined in Article 21(1) of the Treaty on the European Union (TEU), which proclaims that the EU “shall promote multilateral solutions to common problems”. It is also reflected in numerous documents and treaties produced within the framework of EU external relations (Council of the European Union 2003; European Commission 2006 and 2014). This commitment might seem natural, the EU being a multilateral organization itself. However, this intuition that the EU – as an internally multilateral actor – should also display more commitment to multilateralism externally appears problematic. This chapter examines the articulation between this internal and external multilateralism of the EU in the case-law of the Court of Justice of the EU (CJEU). It asks the question whether the main tool of legal interpretation deployed by the Court – teleological interpretation – is inherently biased towards the internal or external perspective.

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