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Transcultural Identity Constructions in a Changing World

Edited By Irene Gilsenan Nordin, Chatarina Edfeldt, Lung-Lung Hu, Herbert Jonsson and André Leblanc

This volume takes a broad outlook on the concept of transculturality. Contributions from 19 authors and specialists, of almost as many diverse origins, grapple with this concept, each in their own way. How can transculturality be described? How can it help us understand our world? Many of the chapters deal with literary texts, others with the stories told in movies, drama, and visual art. There are texts about the complexity of the European Burqa-Ban debate, the negative aspects of Portuguese multiculturalism, or the border-crossing experiences of Filipino immigrants in Ireland. Several chapters examine stereotypes, the idea of movement, the dissolution of cultural borders, or the nature of bilingual writing. It is a unique contribution to the field, on a virtually global scale.
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Contributors

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Mattias Aronsson is a Senior Lecturer in French at Dalarna University, Sweden. His main research area is contemporary French literature (twentieth and twenty-first centuries), and he has published several articles focused on the works of Marguerite Duras and Faïza Guène. He presented his doctoral thesis at Göteborg University: La thématique de l’eau dans l’œuvre de Marguerite Duras (2008).

Chu-chueh Cheng is a Professor of English at the National Chung Hsing University in Taiwan. She has published works on Victorian and contemporary literature. Her recent publications are a monograph, The Margin without Centre: Kazuo Ishiguro (Peter Lang, 2010), and “Cosmopolitan Alterity: America as the Mutual Alien of Britain and Japan in Kazuo Ishiguro’s Novels” in Journal of Commonwealth Literature (2010), and “Cosmos of Similitude in Nocturnes” in Kazuo Ishiguro in a Global Context (Ashgate, 2015). She is currently working on a book project on transgression narratives across genres, media, and cultures.

Emma Duester is an ESRC-funded PhD researcher at the Department of Media and Communications, Goldsmiths, University of London. She is also an Associate Lecturer at Goldsmiths College, and Visiting Lecturer at University of Roehampton. In her research, she explores the contemporary Baltic art worlds of Tallinn, Riga, and Vilnius, in particular, artists’ mobilities across Europe and the effects of this on ideas of ‘home.’

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