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Production of Emotions

Perspectives and Functions

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Edited By Teresa Bruś and Marcin Tereszewski

The essays of this collection are, each in their own way, an attempt to address the centrality of emotions in literary and cultural production in a variety of genres, from medieval moralities to contemporary novels, from English Romanticism to film studies. Emotions are understood as mobile forms or forces, crossing between subjects and locations. The interdisciplinary and diverse nature of this collection reflects the view that emotions are interpersonal and forever slipping beyond our grasp. Yet, in thinking about emotion, we discover unexpected confluences. The contributions in this volume are grouped in five areas which reflect larger categories and provide a valid platform for interpretation of emotions: dynamics of modern culture, history, social sciences, interpersonal contexts, and imagination.
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Kornelia Boczkowska - A Transcendental Response to Space Travel and the Alien Contact: Emotion Elicitation in Walt Disney’s and Pavel Klushantsev’s Early Space Age Documentaries

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Kornelia Boczkowska

Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań

A Transcendental Response to Space Travel and the Alien Contact: Emotion Elicitation in Walt Disney’s and Pavel Klushantsev’s Early Space Age Documentaries

In this paper I present and compare emotion elicitation in Walt Disney’s and Pavel Klushantsev’s early space age documentaries, particularly in their visual and textual representations of space exploration and the alien contact. The study examines the Disney television series, Man in Space (1955) Man and the Moon (1955) and Mars and Beyond (1957), and compares them with Klushantsev’s speculative science documentaries, Doroga k zvezdam (Road to the Stars, 1957), Luna (Moon, 1965) and Mars (1968), often seen as American and Soviet counterparts of each other (Scott and Jurek). Considered one of the first popular attempts at educating the public about the abundant prospects of human interplanetary exploration, both series adopt a serious tone, providing a science-factual vision of man in space, which largely lacks a spiritual quality. Partly contrary to this assumption, I argue that both auditory and visual stimuli tend to elicit emotions which build both a realistic and a transcendental narrative, teetering between science and religion. For instance, while Disney’s episodes intend to present the public with “visions of promise and fear” and thus prepare them for the conquest of space embedded in the frontier myth (McCurdy 61), the Soviet series expose a visionary, utopian and awe-inspiring scenery, offering more “dramatic demonstrations of scientific principle” (Lewis 264).

Diverse...

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