Show Less
Restricted access

The United States as a Divided Nation

Past and Present


Marcin Grabowski, Krystof Kozák and György Tóth

Is the U.S. as a country still capable of finding common ground and effective policy responses in the 21st century, or are the dividing lines within U.S. society actually becoming too deep and too wide to bridge, with potentially grave consequences for American social, political as well as economic development? This book discusses important contemporary U.S. wedge issues such as gun rights, racial and economic inequality, the role of the state, the politics of culture, interpretations of history and collective memory, polarization in national politics, and factionalism in domestic and foreign policy. It provides readers with conceptual tools to grasp the complexity of the current processes, policy formation, and political and social change under way in the United States.
Show Summary Details
Restricted access



MARIA DIACONU received her B.A. at the University of Bucharest, Romania, majoring in English and minoring in American studies. She completed an M.A. degree in American Studies at Heidelberg University with her thesis “Narrating Memory: A comparative study of Toni Morrison’s Beloved and William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury.” At the moment, she is in the process of finishing her dissertation that deals with the post 9/11 novel.

MICHAEL RODEGANG DRESCHER studied English philology, political science and law at Heidelberg University and received his M.A. degree with honors in 2011. He is a doctoral stipendiary of the German National Academic Foundation. Among others, his academic interests include the study of resistance and dissent, the representation of democratic processes in literature, the development of human rights and modern political theory.

JAN HORNÁT is a Ph.D. candidate at Charles University in Prague and Associate Research Fellow at the Institute of International Relations in Prague. His research focuses on democracy promotion, democratization and the security situation in the Indian Ocean and the Western Pacific.

MAREK JÁČ completed his M.A. degree in American Studies at the Institute for International Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences, Charles University in Prague in 2013. His academic interests include American political thought and ideological origins of the American Revolution.

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.