Show Less
Restricted access

Writing from the Margins of Europe

The Application of Postcolonial Theories to Selected Works by William Butler Yeats, John Millington Synge and James Joyce

Series:

Rachael Sumner

The application of postcolonial theories to Irish literature remains a contentious issue. Unlike other colonised nations, Ireland shared a long history of political, economic and artistic ties with its empire-building neighbour, Britain. Yet the Irish response to the project of British imperialism bears comparison with postcolonial models of the relationship between colonisers and the colonised. Writing from the Margins of Europe assesses the potential for postcolonial analysis of works by W. B. Yeats, J. M. Synge and James Joyce. In this exploration of postcolonial parallels between these writers, the author focuses on four core issues: historiography, nationalism, language and displacement.
Show Summary Details
Restricted access

References

← 278 | 279 → References

Extract

Joyce, J. (1901). “The Day of the Rabblement.” [in] (ed.) K. Barry. (2000). Occasional, Critical and Political Writing. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Joyce, J. (1903). “The Soul of Ireland.” [in] (ed.) K. Barry. (2000). Occasional, Critical and Political Writing. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Joyce, J. (1907). “Ireland at the Bar.” [in] (ed.) K. Barry. (2000). Occasional, Critical and Political Writing. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Joyce, J. (1907). “Ireland, Island of Saints and Sages.” [in] (ed.) K. Barry. (2000). Occasional, Critical and Political Writing. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Joyce, J. (1910). “The Home Rule Comet.” [in] (ed.) K. Barry. (2000). Occasional, Critical and Political Writing. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.