Show Less
Restricted access

Language Contact Around the Globe

Proceedings of the LCTG3 Conference

Series:

Edited By Amei Koll-Stobbe and Sebastian Knospe

The fifth volume in the series Language Competence and Language Awareness in Europe unites a collection of peer-reviewed papers delivered at the Third Conference on Language Contact in Times of Globalization (LCTG3) at the University of Greifswald in 2011. The papers are arranged in five thematic sections: Part I studies lexical and grammatical borrowing and pseudo-loans. Part II looks at code-switching and language intertwining in different contexts, while Part III is concerned with the power, political backup and use of different languages in multilingual settings. This is followed by Part IV which comprises three articles on the Linguistic Landscapes of different urban areas. Finally, Part V focuses on language choices in literature and institutional settings.
Show Summary Details
Restricted access

Marisa Patuto, Laia Arnaus Gil, Nadine Eichler, Veronika Jansen, Anika Schmeißer and Natascha Müller (University of Wuppertal): Child-external and -internal factors in bilingual code-switching: Spanish, Italian, French and German

Extract

| 191 →

Child-external and -internal factors in bilingual code-switching: Spanish, Italian, French and German

Marisa Patuto, Malin Hager, Laia Arnaus Gil, Nadine Eichler, Veronika Jansen, Anika Schmeißer, Natascha Müller

Abstract

Past and recent research on code-switching in early bilingualism has focused particularly on adult bilingualism addressing linguistic, sociolinguistic and pragmatic aspects. Our study contributes to the field of child code-switching in early bilingualism. Based on the literature, we predict that code-switching is unrelated to language dominance and the language of the community, whereas the setting and the strategy of bilingual education have an impact on the occurrence of child code-switching. Our longitudinal and cross-sectional studies, however, show that code-switching is unrelated to language dominance and the strategy of bilingual education, but related to the language of the community and the setting. Our investigation reveals that young bilinguals use code-switched utterances to a rather low degree. We will discuss this general result against the background of the young bilingual child as a (nearly) perfect language controller and the notion of code-switching as a (cognitively) costly process.

You are not authenticated to view the full text of this chapter or article.

This site requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books or journals.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.

Or login to access all content.