Show Less
Restricted access

Voices and Visions

Interviews with the Contemporary English-Language Poets of Wales

Series:

Kathryn Gray

Voices and Visions: Interviews with the Contemporary English-Language Poets of Wales captures the perspectives of key Anglophone Welsh and Wales-associated poets who have emerged in the wake of devolution and Wales’s 1997 «yes» vote – or whose career profiles and development were consolidated in its wake. The post-1997 era has been a dynamic one – notably characterised by a striking gender shift, in which women are now at the very centre of Anglophone Welsh poetics. It has also been a period in which a number of idiosyncratic younger voices have emerged and established themselves both within Wales and further afield. Compelling and candid, these interviews examine poets’ practice and preoccupations, their native and elective poetic identities, their personal insights into a changing Wales, the prevailing conditions which may have enabled them, and their place within the wider firmament of British poetics. Voices and Visions: Interviews with the Contemporary English-Language Poets of Wales is a fascinating record of play, seriousness, ambition, and local and international interests from the point of view of some of Wales’s most significant contemporary poets. Poets included: Zoë Brigley, Sarah Corbett, Jasmine Donahaye, Jonathan Edwards, Dai George, Ian Gregson, Philip Gross, Meirion Jordan, Patrick McGuinness, Pascale Petit, Deryn Rees-Jones, Gwyneth Lewis, Rhian Edwards, Zoë Skoulding, and Tiffany Atkinson.

Kathryn Gray is an editor, critic and poet. She is a former editor of Wales’s leading literary magazine, New Welsh Review, and the award-winning independent press Parthian. Between 2012 and 2015 she worked on the research project «Devolved Voices: Welsh Poetry in English since 1997», which was based in the Department of English & Creative Writing at Aberystwyth University and was funded by the Leverhulme Trust. Kathryn Gray’s reviews and articles have been published widely, and she has contributed to arts programmes for the BBC. Her first collection of poems, The Never-Never (Seren, 2004), was shortlisted for the T. S. Eliot Prize and the Forward Prize for Best First Collection.