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Aspects of Sufferring

Classical Themes in Literature in English

Series:

Liliana Sikorska

This book investigates and interprets the presence of classical motifs in English literature. Each article looks at the different formula of allusion and/or intertextuality various English authors have employed rendering the classical themes in their literary works. The meaning of the word «classical» in the present volume refers solely to the works written in the Classical period, thus here classical means Greek and Roman literature. The authors attempt to bring forth various aspects of classical literature which have manifested themselves in literature in English (i.e. British literature as well as post-colonial and Canadian literature). By turning to the so-called classical background we hope to bridge two alternative forms of critical conventions namely that of «tradition» and the newer (and ever more popular) approach of intertextuality.
Contents: Liliana Sikorska: Allusion, influence, intertextuality - classical themes in the literature in English: by way of introduction – Liliana Sikorska: The journey into the underworld in the medieval ‘Harrowing of Hell’ scenes of the cycle plays – Joanna Bukowska: The tragedy of war hereos within the heroic and chivalric tradition: Statius and John Lydgate’s accounts of the fall of Thebes – Jacek Fabiszak: The uses of classical imagery in Christopher Marlowe’s Edward II – Joanna Maciulewicz: From the epic to the historical novel: the transition from the epic to the novelistic tradition in Sir Walter Scott’s Waverley – Agnieszka Setecka: Between the mundane and the mythical: Victorian female characters and their mythical counterparts – Dagmara Drewniak: Exile as suffering in Salman Rushdie’s Grimus, Shame and Fury – Ewa Urbaniak-Rybicka: «I suffer Therefore I Change» - the echoes of Ovid’s Metamorphoses in Aritha van Herk’s No fixed address: an amorous journey – Izabela Krystek: De(con)struction, transformation, metamorphosis - the mythical and the magical in The invention of the world by Jack Hodgins – Dagmara Krzyżaniak: Aspects of classical tragedy in Edward Bond’s The Women – Ryszard Bartnik: Tropes of the classical ‘Passage through Hell’ in works of twentieth century English writers.