Show Less
Restricted access

Violent Language and Its Use in Religious Conflicts in Elizabethan England

Discourses on Values and Norms in the Marprelate Controversy (1588/89)

Series:

Sarah Ströer

Elizabethans saw eloquent language as the mark of the civilized gentleman. At the same time, they believed language to be able to harm, analogous to physical violence. Such concepts of language have important implications for the study of religious controversies of the time, in which the authors often attacked each other harshly via printed language. Employing historical discourse analysis, this study analyses Elizabethan concepts of violent language and shows under which circumstances Elizabethans understood language use as violence. In a second step, the main contributions in one of the most notorious theological controversies of the time, the Marprelate controversy, are analysed in terms of how these concepts of violent language were used as strategies of legitimation and de-legitimation.

BIC Classifications

  • Literature & literary studies (D)
    • Literature: history & criticism (DS)
      • Literary studies: general (DSB)
  • Humanities (H)
    • History (HB)
    • Archaeology (HD)
    • Philosophy (HP)
    • Religion & beliefs (HR)
      • Religion: general (HRA)
        • History of religion (HRAX)
  • Geographical (1)
    • Europe (1D)
      • British Isles (1DB)
        • United Kingdom, Great Britain (1DBK)
          • England (1DBKE)
      • Western Continental Europe (1DD)
  • Languages (2)
    • Indo-European languages (2A)
      • English (2AB)
      • Germanic & Scandinavian languages (2AC)
  • Time period (3)
    • Modern period, c 1500 onwards (3J)
      • c 1500 to c 1600 (3JB)

BISAC Classifications

  • Art (ART)
    • ART / History / General (ART015000)
  • History (HIS)
    • HISTORY / General (HIS000000)
    • Ancient (HIS002)
      • HISTORY / Ancient / Greece (HIS002010)
    • HISTORY / Europe / General (HIS010000)
    • HISTORY / Europe / Eastern (HIS010010)
    • HISTORY / Europe / Western (HIS010020)
    • HISTORY / Europe / France (HIS013000)
    • HISTORY / Europe / Germany (HIS014000)
    • HISTORY / Europe / Great Britain (HIS015000)
    • HISTORY / Europe / Italy (HIS020000)
    • HISTORY / Study & Teaching (HIS035000)
    • HISTORY / Europe / Austria & Hungary (HIS040000)
    • HISTORY / Europe / Spain & Portugal (HIS045000)
  • Literary Criticism (LIT)
    • LITERARY CRITICISM / Feminist (LIT003000)
    • LITERARY CRITICISM / European / Eastern (see also Russian & Former Soviet Union) (LIT004110)
    • LITERARY CRITICISM / European / English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh (LIT004120)
    • LITERARY CRITICISM / European / General (LIT004130)
    • LITERARY CRITICISM / European / French (LIT004150)
    • LITERARY CRITICISM / European / German (LIT004170)
    • LITERARY CRITICISM / European / Italian (LIT004200)
    • LITERARY CRITICISM / Women Authors (LIT004290)
  • Religion (REL)
    • RELIGION / General (REL000000)
    • RELIGION / Christian Church / Canon & Ecclesiastical Law (REL008000)
    • RELIGION / Christianity / Literature & the Arts (REL013000)
    • RELIGION / Ethnic & Tribal (REL029000)
    • RELIGION / Christian Theology / Anthropology (REL067020)
    • RELIGION / Psychology of Religion (REL075000)

THEMA Classifications

  • Biography, Literature & Literary studies (D)
    • Literature: history & criticism (DS)
      • Literary studies: general (DSB)
        • Literary studies: c 1400 to c 1600 (DSBC)
  • History & Archaeology (N)
    • History (NH)
      • European history (NHD)
        • European history: Renaissance (NHDL)
  • Philosophy & Religion (Q)
    • Religion & beliefs (QR)
      • Religion: general (QRA)
        • History of religion (QRAX)
  • Geographical qualifiers (1)
    • Europe (1D)
      • Western Europe (1DD)
        • United Kingdom, Great Britain (1DDU)
          • England (1DDU-GB-E)
  • Language qualifiers (2)
    • Indo-European languages (2A)
      • Germanic & Scandinavian languages (2AC)
        • English (2ACB)
  • Time period qualifiers (3)
    • c 1500 onwards to present day (3M)
      • 16th century, c 1500 to c 1599 (3MD)