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Liminal Borderlands in Irish Literature and Culture

by Irene Gilsenan Nordin (Volume editor) Elin Holmsten (Volume editor)
Conference proceedings 207 Pages
Series: Reimagining Ireland, Volume 9

Summary

Liminality, if interpreted as a concern with borders and states of in-betweenness, is a widespread theme in Irish literature and culture, which is perhaps not surprising considering the colonial and postcolonial background of Ireland. The liminal, from the Latin word limen, meaning «a threshold», can be broadly defined as a transitional place of becoming. It is a borderland state of ambiguity and indeterminacy, leading those who participate in the process to new perspectives and possibilities.
This collection of essays examines the theme of liminality in Irish literature and culture against the philosophical discourse of modernity and focuses on representations of liminality in contemporary Irish literature, art and film in a variety of contexts. The book is divided into four sections. The first part deals with theoretical aspects of liminal states. Other sections focus on liminal narratives and explore drama as liminal rites of passage, while the last part examines transformative spaces in contemporary Irish women’s poetry.

Details

Pages
207
ISBN (PDF)
9783035300765
ISBN (Softcover)
9783039118595
Language
English
Publication date
2011 (March)
Published
Oxford, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, Frankfurt am Main, New York, Wien, 2009. 207 pp. 1 coloured ill.

Biographical notes

Irene Gilsenan Nordin (Volume editor) Elin Holmsten (Volume editor)

The Editors: Irene Gilsenan Nordin is Associate Professor of English at Dalarna University, Sweden. She is Director of the Dalarna University Centre for Irish Studies and the literary editor of Nordic Irish Studies. Elin Holmsten is Assistant Professor of English at Dalarna University, Sweden. She completed her thesis The Hermeneutics of Otherness in Medbh McGuckian’s Poetry at Uppsala University, Sweden, in 2006.

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Title: Liminal Borderlands in Irish Literature and Culture