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Phonology, its Faces and Interfaces

by Jolanta Szpyra-Kozłowska (Volume editor) Eugeniusz Cyran (Volume editor)
Edited Collection 295 Pages

Summary

The papers collected in this volume examine selected aspects of the interaction of phonology with phonetics, morphosyntax and the lexicon in a variety of languages including Korean, Spanish, Brazilian Portuguese, British English, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Dutch and Hawaiian. In order to approach the role and ways of expressing extraphonological information in phonology, the international contributors adopt different methods of analysis (data gathering, experiments, theoretical discussions), couched in various theoretical frameworks (such as Optimality Theory and Government Phonology), which reveal both the multifarious faces and interfaces of modern phonological research.

Table Of Contents

  • Cover
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • About the author
  • About the book
  • This eBook can be cited
  • Contents
  • Biographical Notes
  • Foreword
  • Section 1: The phonology – phonetics interface
  • Phonetic basis of phonological representations: Evidence from expressive morphology in Polish (Bartłomiej Czaplicki)
  • Typology of stress realizations and CVCV representation (Guillaume Enguehard)
  • Consonant duration and degemination in Dutch: at the interface of phonetics and phonology (Haike Jacobs, Joop Kerkhoff and Alexander Greefhorst)
  • Phonological symmetry, phonetic asymmetry, and the acoustic consequences of voicing in Russian (Mayuki Matsui)
  • Representing non-neutralization in Polish sandhi-voicing (Geoffrey Schwartz)
  • No diphthong, no problem (Péter Szigetvári)
  • Section 2: The phonology – morphosyntax interface
  • Space matters: using word boundaries (Jieun Bark)
  • Between phonology and morphosyntax: voicing and spirantization in the Spanish of Gran Canaria (Karolina Broś)
  • The reduction of intervocalic /w/ in Polish (Kamil Kaźmierski)
  • Stress shift across empty categories in Brazilian Portuguese: Experimental results (Raquel Santana Santos)
  • Section 3: Phonology and the lexicon
  • Phonotactic adaptation of English loanwords in Hawaiian – a Government Phonology approach to consonant cluster decomposition (Krzysztof Jaskuła)
  • Consonant deletion in online adaptation of Polish and Ukrainian consonant clusters by native speakers of English (Marek Radomski and Kateryna Sydorenko)
  • English ash in loanwords into Polish. Factors behind two patterns of adaptation (Jolanta Szpyra-Kozłowska and Marek Radomski)

← 6 | 7 →

Biographical notes

Jieun Bark is a PhD student of Linguistics at University of Nantes, a member of LLING UMR 6310 CNRS, France. Her research interests focus on Korean phonology and have recently been extended to Oïl languages exploring segmental structures and representations of phonological processes. She is currently researching phonology of Gallo, an endangered language spoken in Northern France, with specific emphasis on sociolinguistic variations. She works as a coordinator for Bilingualism Matters@Nantes to disseminate research findings from AThEME project, supported by European Commission.

Karolina Broś is Assistant Professor at the Institute of Applied Linguistics at the University of Warsaw, Poland. She specializes in theoretical linguistics. Her research interests include phonology and its interfaces, speech perception, Spanish dialectology and language change. In 2015, she published a monograph on weakening processes entitled Survival of the Fittest: Fricative Lenition in English and Spanish from the Perspective of Optimality Theory. Her current research project focuses on the Spanish of the Canary Islands.

Eugeniusz Cyran is Professor of Linguistics and Chair of the Department of Phonology and Phonetics in the Institute of English Studies at John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland. He has published on Polish and Irish phonology and the phonology-phonetics interface. His interests include syllabic organization, sub-segmental representation and the relationship between phonology and phonetics. His books include Resonance Elements in Phonology. A Study in Munster Irish (1997), Complexity Scales and Licensing in Phonology (2010), Between Phonology and Phonetics (2014).

Bartłomiej Czaplicki is Associate Professor of Linguistics in the Department of English Language and Linguistics at the University of Warsaw, Poland. He has published on Polish, English and Ukrainian phonology and morphology, sound change and sociolinguistics. His recent book is entitled Lexicon Based Phonology. Arbitrariness in Grammar (2014).

Guillaume Enguehard is a PhD student in University Paris 7, and ATER in University of Lille 3, France. His research interests include phonology and morphophonology from a typological and structural point of view. His PhD dissertation ← 7 | 8 → addresses the representation of stress as a skeletal unit in different languages. He has published on Livonian phonology and Russian morpho-phonology. His articles include “The underlying representation of the Russian suffix -ɨva” (2015), “À propos du stød live dans les mots de type pū’dəz” (2015).

Alexander Greefhorst is an MA student in the Research Master Language and Communication Department, Radboud University, Nijmegen specializing in computational linguistics and the phonology of French and Dutch.

Haike Jacobs is Professor of French Linguistics at the Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands. He is co-author of a widely used handbook of phonology, editor of various volumes on Romance linguistics and sound change, author of many articles in international journals (Linguistic Inquiry, Linguistic Review, Canadian Journal of Linguistics, Probus, Nordic Journal of linguistics, Recherches linguistiques de Vincennes, Phonology).

Krzysztof Jaskuła is Associate Professor of Linguistics in the Department of Phonology and Phonetics in the Institute of English Studies at John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland. His interests include diachronic and synchronic phonetics and phonology of Celtic, Slavic, Romance and Germanic languages, etymology and loanwords. His books include Ancient Sound Changes and Old Irish Phonology (2006), and Levels of Interpretation in Sound Systems (2014).

Joop Kerkhoff is Manager of the Phonetics Lab of the Linguistics Department at Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

Kamil Kaźmierski is Assistant Professor at the Faculty of English at Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Poland. He has worked on phonetics and phonology of Polish and English. He is author of the book Vowel-Shifting in the English Language. An Evolutionary Account (2015).

Mayuki Matsui is a post-doctoral research fellow in the Department of Linguistic Theory and Structure at the National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics, Tokyo, Japan. Her research interests include the interfaces of phonology, phonetics, and psycholinguistics and the experimental investigation of sound structure and variation, using articulatory, acoustic, and perceptual methods. Her past research has mainly focused on the phonetics and phonology of laryngeal contrast and contrast reduction in Russian. ← 8 | 9 →

Marek Radomski is a research assistant in the Phonetics and Phonology Unit of the Department of English at Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, Lublin, Poland. He has published on loanword phonology, Optimality Theory and foreign accent perception.

Raquel Santana Santos is Associate Professor in the Department of Linguistics at the Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil. She has been working on the interaction of phonology and syntax and on the acquisition of phonology by L1 and L2 learners.

Geoffrey Schwartz is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of English at Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, where he specializes in phonetics, second language speech acquisition, and phonological theory. In addition to nearly forty publications, he has also been the principal investigator of two research projects funded by the Polish National Science Centre.

Kateryna Sydorenko is a PhD student in the Phonetics and Phonology Unit of the English Department at Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, Lublin, Poland. Her major scientific interest lies within the field of phonology. She has presented results of her findings on phonological adaptation of Ukrainian words by English native speakers at APAP (2015) and LingBaW (2016) conferences.

Péter Szigetvári is currently Head of the Department of English Linguistics at Eötvös Loránd University in Budapest. He teaches linguistics, phonology, and typography. His interests include syllabic organization in CV and VC phonology, Hungarian vowel harmony, markedness, and consonant lenition. Recently, he is trying to make sense of the vowel system of English.

Jolanta Szpyra-Kozłowska is Professor of English Linguistics and Chair of Phonetics and Phonology in the Department of English at Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, Lublin, Poland. She has published extensively (7 books, 5 edited volumes and over 100 papers) on English and Polish phonology, the phonology-morphology interaction, pronunciation pedagogy and gender linguistics. Her books include The Phonology-Morphology Interface. Cycles, Levels and Words (1989), Three Tiers in Polish and English Phonology (1995), Pronunciation in EFL Instruction: A Research-Based Approach (2015). ← 9 | 10 →

← 10 | 11 →

Foreword

Within the last fifty years perhaps no concept has gained as much popularity and importance as ‘interface’, first in the computer industry, then in other fields of scholarly research, including linguistics. Dictionaries inform us that ‘interface’ is, among other things, ‘the place or area at which different things meet and communicate with or affect each other’ (Merriam-Webster Dictionary) or ‘the facts, problems, considerations, theories, practices, etc. shared by two or more disciplines, procedures or fields of study’ (Thesaurus.com).1 These definitions account for the fact why the term ‘interface’ is frequently used in modern linguistics which emphasizes that various components of language are not fully autonomous, but interact with each other in a rich and complex variety of ways. This volume is concerned with the interaction of phonology with other aspects of language, that is with its various interfaces. As has often been demonstrated, phonology maintains close links with phonetics, morphology, syntax and the lexicon. While these interconnections are widely acknowledged and generally recognized, it is their extent, types as well as formal expression in various theoretical frameworks that remain a matter of considerable controversy and lively dispute in both older and more recent studies.

The papers collected in this volume examine selected problems in a variety of languages including Korean, Spanish, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Brazilian Portuguese, British English, Dutch and Hawaiian which are on the borderline of phonology on the one hand, and, on the other hand, phonetics (Section 1), morphosyntax (Section 2) and the lexicon (Section 3), that is which deal with different aspects of the interface issue. In other words, all contributions are concerned with the role and ways of expressing extraphonological information in phonology. In order to find adequate solutions to the reported problems, the authors adopt different methods of analysis (data gathering, experiments, theoretical discussions), couched in various frameworks (such as Optimality Theory and Government Phonology), which reveal both multifarious faces and interfaces of modern phonological research. ← 11 | 12 →

Section 1. The phonology – phonetics interface. One of the most controversial issues in modern linguistics is the relation between phonology and phonetics, which comes as no surprise as both share the object of study, that is speech sounds. The problem that arises is deciding how autonomous they are from each other and whether and where the boundary between them can be drawn. Radically different answers have been provided to these questions. Thus, some scholars argue that no phonology – phonetics interface exists at all as there is no need to isolate two separate components dealing with sounds as they require the same primitives and mechanisms. Others maintain that these two aspects of language should be kept strictly apart since they differ significantly in that phonology is concerned with categorical operations and phonetics with gradient phenomena, which means that units of phonological and phonetic representations are not the same. Yet other researchers keep the middle ground and claim that while phonetics and phonology are discrete disciplines, yet they interact significantly. No agreement has been reached, however, as to the details of this interaction and ways of implementing phonological representations by the phonetics.

In this volume six papers in Section 1 address various aspects of the phonology – phonetics interface in Polish, Russian, Dutch and British English.

Bartłomiej Czaplicki, in his analysis of expressive forms (hypocoristics and diminutives) in Polish, argues for close ties between phonetics and phonology. Contrary to the generative tradition, the author claims that phonological representations are constructed on the basis of phonetic information and disregard morphological alternations and distribution of segments. He provides synchronic and diachronic evidence for this stance concerning palatalization processes.

Guillaume Enguehard approaches the typology of different phonetic realizations of stress which include vowel lengthening, consonant lengthening, lenition, fortition, glottalization, aspiration and tones, and their phonological representations within a CVCV Government Phonology framework. He argues that the CV stress unit must be isolated whose position does not depend on its phonetic realization and discusses the mechanisms responsible for implementing word stress.

Haike Jacobs, Joop Kerkhoff and Alexander Greefhorst examine the interaction of phonetics and phonology involved in consonant duration and degemination in Dutch. They report on three experiments meant to determine the duration and perception of single and double consonants across word boundaries. The following discussion considers two possible approaches to the collected data: either a phonological degemination view or a phonetic implementation account, with the authors’ arguments in favour of the former option. ← 12 | 13 →

Mayuki Matsui’s study is concerned with the voicing of Russian obstruents which display symmetry in terms of their phonological properties (voiced vs. voiceless segments), but differ with regard to the implementation of voicing in stops and fricatives (completely devoiced vs. partially devoiced consonants). The author examines this issue experimentally focusing on the duration of voicing and constriction in the two types of consonants and demonstrates that voiced fricatives are more frequently partially devoiced than stops due to aerodynamic constraints present in the former.

Geoffrey Schwartz presents an account of a complex dialectal Polish sandhi-voicing process within the Onset Prominence approach, criticizes the previous analyses and argues that in this framework phonological representations can adequately account for the phonetic facts, encode the relative boundary strength and express the connection between voicing phenomena in phrases and the manner of articulation (sonorants vs. obstruents) of the triggers.

Details

Pages
295
ISBN (ePUB)
9783631693360
ISBN (PDF)
9783653066852
ISBN (MOBI)
9783631693377
ISBN (Hardcover)
9783631674741
Language
English
Publication date
2016 (December)
Published
Frankfurt am Main, Bern, Bruxelles, New York, Oxford, Warszawa, Wien, 2016. 295 pp., 13 b/w ill., 28 b/w tables

Biographical notes

Jolanta Szpyra-Kozłowska (Volume editor) Eugeniusz Cyran (Volume editor)

Jolanta Szpyra-Kozłowska is Professor of English Linguistics and Chair of Phonetics and Phonology in the Department of English at Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, Lublin, Poland. She has published extensively on English and Polish phonology, the phonology-morphology interaction, and pronunciation pedagogy and gender linguistics. Eugeniusz Cyran is Professor of Linguistics and Chair of the Department of Phonology and Phonetics in the Institute of English Studies at John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland. He has published on Polish and Irish phonology and the phonology-phonetics interface. His interests include syllabic organization, sub-segmental representation and the relationship between phonology and phonetics.

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Title: Phonology, its Faces and Interfaces