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Conducting Research in Translation Technologies

by Pilar Sánchez-Gijón (Volume editor) Olga Torres-Hostench (Volume editor) Bartolomé Mesa-Lao (Volume editor)
Edited Collection XVIII, 317 Pages

Summary

The literature on translation and technology has generally taken two forms: general overviews, in which the tools are described, and functional descriptions of how such tools and technologies are implemented in specific projects, often with a view to improving the quality of translator training. There has been far less development of the deeper implications of technology in its cultural, ethical, political and social dimensions. In an attempt to address this imbalance, the present volume offers a collection of articles, written by leading experts in the field, that explore some of the current communicational and informational trends that are defining our contemporary world and impinging on the translation profession. The contributions have been divided into three main areas in which translation and technology come together: (1) social spheres, (2) education and training and (3) research. This volume represents a bold attempt at contextualizing translation technologies and their applications within a broader cultural landscape and encourages intellectual reflection on the crucial role played by technology in the translation profession.

Table Of Contents

  • Cover
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • About the editors
  • About the book
  • This eBook can be cited
  • Contents
  • List of figures
  • List of tables
  • Preface
  • Foreword
  • Part I Translation technologies in society
  • 1 Translation resources in not-for-profit contexts: A case for immediacy in humanitarian work
  • 2 Sleeping with the enemy? Or should translators work with Google Translate?
  • 3 Translation technology in institutional settings: A decision-making framework for the implementation of computer-assisted translation systems
  • 4 Making localised Web content accessible: A collaborative task between the developer and the localiser
  • Part II Translation technologies in translator training
  • 5 Business translation training and ad hoc corpora
  • 6 Investigating corpus-assisted translation teaching: A pilot study
  • 7 Social dynamics in the translation technologies sphere: Sharing knowledge and learning tools in collaborative virtual environments
  • 8 Challenges and constraints in designing a localisation module for a multilingual cohort
  • Part III Translation technologies in Translation Studies research
  • 9 Differences between translations made with and without CAT tools: An empirical approach
  • 10 The relevance of metadata during the localisation process: An experiment
  • 11 The importance of being logged: What tool settings can reveal about the behaviour of translators’ querying a concordancer
  • 12 Technology and e-resources for legal translators: The LAW10n project
  • Notes on Contributors
  • Index
  • Series index

List of figures

Figure 1.1

A timeline of the translator’s workstation

Figure 2.1

Options shown after highlighting cost-saving/de redução de custos in GT

Figure 2.2

Options shown after highlighting -saving solutions/soluções de economia de in GT

Figure 2.3

GT chunking of sat on the/sentou-se no for the Portuguese translation

Figure 2.4

GT chunking of cat sat on/gato se sentó en for the Spanish translation

Figure 2.5

A prompt asking whether a correct sentence may contain a mistake

Figure 2.6

Google Translator Toolkit interface as seen in October 2011

Figure 4.1

Non-accessibilised and accessibilised versions of the UNAIDS webpage Civil Society and Universal Access

Figure 4.2

Translation2 and Translation3. Spanish versions of the UNAIDS webpage Civil Society and Universal Access, translated by two different localisation professionals

Figure 5.1

Compilation of tasks related to ad hoc corpora

Figure 5.2

Tasks related to discourse analysis

Figure 5.3

Tasks related to terminology and collocation extraction

Figure 5.4

Tasks related to conceptual parallelisms

Figure 5.5

Tasks related to vocabulary and concordance

Figure 5.6

Tasks related to direct translation

Figure 7.1

SDL customer ideation portal

Figure 7.2

LinguisTech portal

Figure 7.3

LinguisTech Social Media page

Figure 7.4

LinguisTech Resource Centre page

Figure 8.1

Localisation module and language combinations (2007–2008 to 2010–2011)

Figure 9.1

Time/translation editing environment

Figure 9.2

Time/translator profile

Figure 9.3

Time/gender

Figure 9.4

Text/translation growth

Figure 9.5

Text/translation growth according to translation editing environment

Figure 9.6

Text/translation growth according to translator profiles

Figure 9.7

Number of interference traces according to different translation environments and translator profiles

Figure 9.8

Example of segmentation in the Obis category

Figure 9.9

Obis and E Categories, representing two divergent trends

Figure 9.10

Comparison of the visualisation of an indicator in E1 (left) and E2 (right)

Figure 10.1

Extraction/merge principle of XLIFF

Figure 10.2

Basic XLIFF file

Figure 10.3

alt-trans element in XLIFF

Figure 10.4

XLIFF data and metadata as shown by Swordfish II

Figure 10.5

Enriched XLIFF file in Swordfish II

Figure 10.6

The six possible data/metadata distribution solutions

Figure 10.7

Chosen distribution of data

Figure 10.8

Several translation suggestions shown in Swordfish II

Figure 10.9

Task completion time

Figure 10.10

Task completion analysed in sections

Figure 10.11

LISA QA Analysis, all groups

Figure 10.12

LISA QA Analysis, Group A

Figure 10.13

LISA QA Analysis, Group B

Figure 10.14

LISA QA Analysis, Group C

Figure 10.15

Useful and consulted MD comparison

Figure 10.16

Less useful or not consulted MD

Figure 10.17

Useful and consulted vs less useful and not consulted MD

Figure 11.1

Frequency distribution of searches (ALL–ALL) according to the selected target language

Figure 11.2

Frequency distribution of searches (EN–ALL with pre-processing) according to the selected target language

Figure 11.3

Frequency distribution of searches on the basis of the submitting institution

Figure 11.4

Frequency distribution of searches for each day of the selected month (September 2010)

Figure 11.5

Frequency distribution of concordance searches across hourly time spans

Figure 11.6

Distribution of searches according to the ‘Year(s)’ filter

Figure 11.7

Distribution of the ‘Years’ filter according to the time span considered

Figure 11.8

Joint frequency distribution of querying institution and target language families

Figure 11.9

Joint frequency distribution of search mode and individual target languages

Figure 11.10

Joint frequency distribution of search mode and individual target languages previously filtered on the zero-result queries

Figure 11.11

Joint frequency distribution of a selection of the most common years from the ‘Year(s)’ filter and the querying institution

Figure 11.12

Joint frequency distribution of a selection of the most common years from the ‘Year(s)’ filter and individual target languages

Figure 12.1

Example of a search for the term ‘entire agreement’

Figure 12.2

Details

Pages
XVIII, 317
ISBN (PDF)
9783035307320
ISBN (ePUB)
9783035394870
ISBN (MOBI)
9783035394863
ISBN (Softcover)
9783034309943
Language
English
Publication date
2015 (July)
Published
Oxford, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, Frankfurt am Main, New York, Wien, 2015. XVIII, 317 pp., 80 b/w ill.

Biographical notes

Pilar Sánchez-Gijón (Volume editor) Olga Torres-Hostench (Volume editor) Bartolomé Mesa-Lao (Volume editor)

Pilar Sánchez-Gijón is a senior lecturer in translation technologies at the Department of Translation and Interpreting at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain, where she teaches subjects related to CAT tools, corpus linguistics, machine translation and terminology. Since 1999, she has been a member of the Tradumàtica research group, which focuses on translation and technologies. Her research focuses on translation technologies, localization and post-editing. Olga Torres-Hostench is a lecturer in translation at the Department of Translation and Interpreting at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain, where she teaches translation and localization. Since 2003, she has been a member of the Tradumàtica research group, which focuses on translation and technologies. Her research focuses on technologies and specialized translation. Bartolomé Mesa-Lao is a research affiliate at the Centre for Research and Innovation in Translation and Translation Technology (CRITT), Copenhagen Business School (Denmark). His current research interests are in translator-computer interaction and the changes brought about by processes of globalisation in translator training.

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