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After God – The Normative Power of the Will from the Nietzschean Perspective

by Marta Soniewicka (Author)
Monographs 278 Pages
Series: DIA-LOGOS , Volume 24

Summary

This book analyzes the main problems of Friedrich Nietzsche’s critical philosophy, such as the theory of being, the theory of knowledge and the theory of values. It also addresses his positive program which is based on a number of fundamental conceptions, namely the will to power, the Übermensch, bestowing virtue and the notion of the eternal recurrence. The «death of God» must, in Nietzsche’s opinion, lead to a revolution in human consciousness which requires the creation of a new frame of reference for values. To realize this aim, Nietzsche invokes the will which has the normative power to create values and even to overcome time. The author sets his focus on the «tragic gay science» that has never been fully elucidated and still affords new perspectives for interpretation.

Table Of Contents

  • Cover
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • About the author
  • About the book
  • This eBook can be cited
  • Table of Contents
  • Abbreviations
  • Acknowledgments
  • Introduction
  • Part I. The ontological and epistemological assumptions of Nietzsche’s philosophy
  • Chapter 1. The meaning of the ‘death of God’ and its ontological consequences
  • I. Unbelievable belief
  • II. The moral-metaphysical structure of the world
  • 1. The loss of the feeling of transcendence
  • 2. The abolition of the dualism between the apparent world and the real
  • 3. The ‘New Philosophy’: beyond idealism and positivism
  • Chapter 2. ‘The sponge to wipe away the horizon’: the normative character of cognition
  • I. A Critique of the will to truth
  • 1. Knowledge as an adventure of the spirit
  • 2. The rejection of metaphysical truth: the will to appearance instead of the will to truth
  • 2.1. Truth as a useful illusion
  • 2.2. Truth as a metaphor
  • II. Perspectivism
  • 1. Language
  • 2. Interpretation: lawfulness and justice
  • 2.1. Linguistic interpretation
  • 2.2. Genealogical interpretation
  • Chapter 3. The genealogical method and its philosophical applications
  • I. Psychological realism
  • II. The origins of morality: ressentiment
  • 1. The concept of ressentiment
  • 2. The reversal of values
  • 3. Ressentiment and Christianity
  • 4. Ressentiment as a source of contemporary spiritual crisis
  • III. The origins of laws: degrees of power
  • 1. Law in the metaphysical sense: justice as pre-established order
  • 2. Justice as mutual advantage
  • 2.1. Rectificatory justice
  • 2.2. Customary law and statutory law: the role of custom and coercion
  • 3. ‘The genius of justice’: the self-sublimation of justice in love
  • Part II. Nietzschean Anthropodicy
  • Chapter 4. Metamorphoses of the spirit: the normative character of the will to power
  • I. The ethics of duty: ‘Thou Shalt’
  • 1. Ought, obligation, duty
  • 2. Guilt, responsibility
  • 3. A critique of the ethics of duty
  • II. The Will: ‘I will’
  • 1. Free Will
  • 2. Weak and strong wills
  • 3. The will to power
  • 4. The conception of agency and agent
  • 4.1. Will (willing) and acts of will (acting)
  • 4.2. The construction of the subject
  • III. The total innocence of becoming: ‘I am’
  • Chapter 5. The creative will as an expression of the self overcoming life
  • I. The necessity of becoming oneself
  • 1. Willing a self
  • 2. Creating the self and our laws
  • 3. The desire to give the self: the bestowing virtue
  • II. Overcoming the human
  • 1. Transcending without transcendence
  • 2. Übermensch
  • Chapter 6. The will to return – amor fati
  • I. The cosmological interpretation of the idea of eternal return
  • II. The ethical-existential interpretation of the idea of the eternal recurrence
  • III. The metaphysical interpretation of the idea of the eternal recurrence
  • 1. Unhistorical, historical and suprahistorical consciousness
  • 2. The myth of the eternal recurrence and the Dionysian formula of existence: amor fati
  • 3. Subjectivity and the experience of time
  • 4. The Riddle of Zarathustra
  • IV. The mystical interpretation of the eternal recurrence
  • Endings: Philosophical Don Juanism
  • References
  • Nietzsche’s Works
  • Literature
  • Series index

Marta Soniewicka

After God –
The Normative Power
of the Will from the
Nietzschean Perspective

About the author

Marta Soniewicka is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Philosophy of Law and Legal Ethics at the Faculty of Law and Administration of the Jagiellonian University in Krakow (Poland). Her research interests are focused on the philosophy of law, political philosophy, and ethics. She has authored and co-authored numerous articles, chapters and books.

About the book

This book analyses the main aspects and issues of Friedrich Nietzsche’s critical philosophy, such as the theory of being, the theory of knowledge and the theory of values. It also addresses his positive program which is based on a number of fundamental conceptions, namely the will to power, the Übermensch, bestowing virtue and the notion of the eternal recurrence. The ‘death of God’ must, in Nietzsche’s opinion, lead to a revolution in human consciousness which requires the creation of a new frame of reference for values. To realize this aim, Nietzsche invokes the will which has the normative power to create values and even to overcome time. The author sets his focus on the ‘tragic gay science’ that has never been fully elucidated and still affords new perspectives for interpretation.

This eBook can be cited

This edition of the eBook can be cited. To enable this we have marked the start and end of a page. In cases where a word straddles a page break, the marker is placed inside the word at exactly the same position as in the physical book. This means that occasionally a word might be bifurcated by this marker.

Table of Contents

Abbreviations

Acknowledgments

Introduction

Part I. The ontological and epistemological assumptions of Nietzsche’s philosophy

Chapter 1. The meaning of the ‘death of God’ and its ontological consequences

I. Unbelievable belief

II. The moral-metaphysical structure of the world

1. The loss of the feeling of transcendence

2. The abolition of the dualism between the apparent world and the real

3. The ‘New Philosophy’: beyond idealism and positivism

Chapter 2. ‘The sponge to wipe away the horizon’: the normative character of cognition

I. A Critique of the will to truth

1. Knowledge as an adventure of the spirit

2. The rejection of metaphysical truth: the will to appearance instead of the will to truth

2.1. Truth as a useful illusion

2.2. Truth as a metaphor

II. Perspectivism

1. Language

2. Interpretation: lawfulness and justice

2.1. Linguistic interpretation

2.2. Genealogical interpretation ←7 | 8→

Chapter 3. The genealogical method and its philosophical applications

I. Psychological realism

II. The origins of morality: ressentiment

1. The concept of ressentiment

2. The reversal of values

3. Ressentiment and Christianity

4. Ressentiment as a source of contemporary spiritual crisis

III. The origins of laws: degrees of power

1. Law in the metaphysical sense: justice as pre-established order

2. Justice as mutual advantage

2.1. Rectificatory justice

2.2. Customary law and statutory law: the role of custom and coercion

3. ‘The genius of justice’: the self-sublimation of justice in love

Part II. Nietzschean Anthropodicy

Chapter 4. Metamorphoses of the spirit: the normative character of the will to power

I. The ethics of duty: ‘Thou Shalt’

1. Ought, obligation, duty

2. Guilt, responsibility

3. A critique of the ethics of duty

II. The Will: ‘I will’

1. Free Will

2. Weak and strong wills

3. The will to power

4. The conception of agency and agent

4.1. Will (willing) and acts of will (acting)

4.2. The construction of the subject

III. The total innocence of becoming: ‘I am’ ←8 | 9→

Chapter 5. The creative will as an expression of the self overcoming life

I. The necessity of becoming oneself

Details

Pages
278
ISBN (ePUB)
9783631735633
ISBN (MOBI)
9783631735640
ISBN (PDF)
9783631735626
ISBN (Hardcover)
9783631716403
Language
English
Publication date
2019 (April)
Tags
Friedrich Nietzsche Perspectivism Genealogical method Eternal recurrence Ressentiment Übermensch
Published
Berlin, Bern, Bruxelles, New York, Oxford, Warszawa, Wien, 2018. 278 pp.

Biographical notes

Marta Soniewicka (Author)

Marta Soniewicka is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Philosophy of Law and Legal Ethics at the Faculty of Law and Administration of the Jagiellonian University in Krakow (Poland). Her research interests concentrate on the philosophy of law, political philosophy, and ethics. She has authored and co-authored numerous articles, chapters and books.

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Title: After God – The Normative Power of the Will from the Nietzschean Perspective