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The Changing Education for Journalism and the Communication Occupations

The Impact of Labor Markets

by Lee B. Becker (Author) Tudor Vlad (Author)
Textbook XXII, 264 Pages

Summary

This book provides a unique perspective on journalism and communication education, drawing on extensive, detailed data across time to examine the evolution of education for journalism and related communication occupations such as public relations and advertising. It demonstrates how journalism and communication education adapted to forces within the university as well as forces from outside the university. Particular attention is given to the impact of the labor markets to which journalism and communication education is linked. The analysis shows dramatically how dependent employers are on journalism and communication education, how educational institutions have changed to accommodate female and minority students, and how the labor market has responded to the graduates produced. Part history, part sociological analysis, this book will change the reader’s understanding of education for journalism, public relations, advertising and the related occupations. It also offers insights about what the future of education in these fields holds.

Table Of Contents

  • Cover
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • About the author(s)/editor(s)
  • About the book
  • This eBook can be cited
  • Contents
  • List of Figures
  • List of Charts
  • List of Tables
  • Acknowledgments (Lee B. Becker)
  • References
  • Acknowledgments (Tudor Vlad)
  • Chapter One: Introduction
  • Nature of Labor Market
  • Journalism and Mass Communication Education
  • Survey Projects
  • Annual Survey of Journalism and Mass Communication Enrollments
  • Annual Survey of Journalism and Mass Communication Graduates
  • Hiring Surveys
  • Faculty Salary Survey
  • Doctoral Degrees Granted
  • Organization of Book
  • Theoretical Perspective
  • References
  • Section One: Surveys of Graduates
  • Chapter Two: Examining Employment Trends
  • Methodology
  • Measures of Employment
  • Findings
  • Explaining the Trends
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter Three: Examining Compensation Trends
  • Methods
  • Salaries
  • Benefits
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter Four: Predictors of Job Market Success
  • General Literature
  • Journalism Literature
  • Expectations
  • Methodology
  • Measures Used
  • Dependent Variables
  • Predictor Variables
  • Recoding of Variables
  • Predictor Variables
  • Findings
  • Supplemental Analysis with Accreditation
  • Summary and Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter Five: Student Attitudes, Behaviors and Curricular Specialization
  • Evaluating the Impact of Journalism Education
  • Methodology
  • Press Freedom and Media Rights
  • Media Use
  • Reasons for Selecting Curriculum
  • Career Goals
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Section Two: Surveys of Enrollments
  • Chapter Six: Trends in Enrollments and Degrees Granted
  • Systems, Functions, and Adaptation
  • Curricular Diversification
  • Myths and Trends
  • Methodology
  • Data Prior to 1988
  • Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System
  • Findings
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter Seven: Predictors of Curricular Innovation
  • Previous Research
  • External Influences and Weak Ties
  • Institutional Connections and Innovation
  • Questions to be Addressed
  • Methodology
  • 2011 Survey
  • 2012 Survey
  • Measures
  • Findings
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Section Three: Surveys of Faculties
  • Chapter Eight: Diversification of the Faculty
  • Diversity in American Universities
  • Diversity in Journalism and Mass Communication Education
  • Predictors of Diversity
  • Methodology
  • Findings
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter Nine: Faculty Characteristics and Compensation
  • University Faculties
  • Methodology
  • Findings
  • Additional Analysis
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter Ten: Doctoral Enrollment Pipeline
  • Doctoral Instruction
  • Methodology
  • Findings
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Section Four: Special Topics
  • Chapter Eleven: Trends in Entry-Level Hiring
  • Labor Force Explanations
  • Methods
  • Findings
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter Twelve: The Contributions of HBCUs and HSIs
  • Kerner Commission Report
  • Industry Response
  • Accrediting Standards
  • HBCUs and HSIs
  • Methodology
  • Findings
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter Thirteen: Summary and Conclusions
  • Theoretical Perspective
  • Summary of Findings
  • Findings and Theoretical Model
  • Education and Professions
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • Index
  • Series index

| vii →

Figures

Figure 6.1. Comparison of Enrollments Same Schools, by Sequence, 2011 and 2012

Figure 6.2. Comparison of Enrollments Same Schools, by Sequence, 2012 and 2013 Degrees Granted

Figure 13.1. Model of the Relationship between Journalism and Mass Communication Education and the Labor Market

| ix →

Charts

Chart 2.1. Return Rate and Unemployment Rate by Year

Chart 2.2. Employment Status When Returned Questionnaire, Bachelor’s

Chart 2.3. Employment Measures, Bachelor’s

Chart 2.4. Unemployment Rate for Bachelor’s Degree Recipients Who Sought Work, When They Returned Questionnaire

Chart 2.5. National and Journalism and Mass Communication Graduates Unemployment Rates

Chart 3.1. Salaries

Chart 3.2. Salaries and Employment

Chart 6.1. Journalism and Mass Communication Enrollment 1988–2013

Chart 6.2. Journalism and Mass Communication Enrollment and Total University Enrollment

Chart 6.3. Percent Female Journalism and Mass Communication Enrollment and Total University Enrollment

Chart 6.4. Journalism and Mass Communication Enrollments by Sequence

Chart 6.5. Percent Minority Journalism and Mass Communication Enrollment and Total University Enrollment ← ix | x →

Chart 6.6. Bachelor’s Degree Granted 2000–2013 IPEDS and Annual Survey Estimates

Chart 6.7. Master’s and Doctoral Degrees Granted 2000–2013 (Dual Y Axes) IPEDS and Annual Survey Estimates

Chart 6.8. Bachelor’s Degrees Granted in Communication, Liberals Arts, Social Sciences

Chart 6.9. Bachelor’s Degrees Granted in Communication, Business, Computer Science, Engineering

Chart 6.10. Journalism and Mass Communication Enrollments and Bachelor’s Degree Recipient Unemployment Rate

Chart 8.1. Faculty by Race

Chart 8.2. Faculty by Race by Accreditation Status (White Non-Hispanic Only)

Chart 8.3. Faculty by Race by Control (White Non-Hispanic Only)

Chart 8.4. Faculty by Race by Carnegie Classification (White Non-Hispanic Only)

Chart 8.5. Faculty by Race by Region (White Non-Hispanic Only)

Chart 8.6. Faculty by Gender

Chart 8.7. Faculty by Gender by Accreditation Status (Males Only)

Chart 8.8. Faculty by Gender by Control (Males Only)

Chart 8.9. Faculty by Gender by Carnegie Classification (Males Only)

Chart 8.10. Faculty by Gender by Region (Males Only)

Chart 9.1. Rank of Journalism and Mass Communication Faculty

Chart 9.2. Tenure Status of Journalism and Mass Communication Faculty (% with Tenure)

Chart 9.3. Final Degree of Journalism and Mass Communication Faculty

Chart 9.4. Average Years Full-Time Communication Occupational Experience Journalism and Mass Communication Faculty

Chart 9.5. Teaching Specialties of Journalism and Mass Communication Faculty

Chart 9.6. Average Age of Journalism and Mass Communication Faculty

Chart 9.7. Average Years Full-Time Teaching Journalism and Mass Communication Faculty

Chart 9.8. Mean Salary Journalism and Mass Communication Faculty

Chart 9.9. Mean Salary Increase Journalism and Mass Communication Faculty (Mean Percent) ← x | xi →

Chart 10.1. Number of Universities with Communication Doctoral Programs

Chart 10.2. Use of IPEDS CIP Codes in 2012–2013

Chart 10.3. Doctoral Degree Granted: 2000–2013

Chart 10.4. Race, Ethnicity, Status of Doctoral Degree Recipients

Chart 10.5. Gender of Doctoral Degree Recipients

Chart 11.1. Where Daily Newspapers Found Full-Time Newsroom Employees

Chart 11.2. Percentage of Hires from College with Journalism and Mass Communication Degrees in Daily Newspapers

Chart 11.3. Percentage of Hires from College with Journalism and Mass Communication Degrees: Television and Radio

Chart 11.4. Daily Newspaper Hiring and Level of Employment of Journalism and Mass Communication Graduates

| xiii →

Tables

Table 2.1. Population and Samples Annual Survey of Journalism and Mass Communication Graduates

Table 2.2. Predictors of Journalism and Mass Communication Unemployment

Table 3.1. Salaries of Bachelor’s Degree Recipients with Full-Time Jobs

Table 3.2. Benefits

Table 3.3. Benefits by Employer Type

Table 4.1. Descriptive Statistics Variables in Analysis

Table 4.2. Correlates of Individual-Level Job Market Success

Table 4.3. Regression for Number of Job Offers

Table 4.4. Regression for Employment

Table 4.5. Regression for Communication Job

Table 4.6. Regression for Salary

Table 4.7. Regression for Benefits

Table 5.1. Media Rights Items: General Population and Journalism and Mass Communication Graduates

Table 5.2. Comparison of Means for Media Rights Items by Major and Gender ← xiii | xiv →

Table 5.3. Media Use for Journalism and Mass Communication Graduates and Nationally (Percent)

Table 5.4. News Use Index by Major

Table 5.5. Reasons for Studying Journalism and Mass Communication by Major

Table 5.6. What Bachelor’s Degree Recipients Said They Want in Their Jobs and Careers by Major

Table 6.1. Population for Annual Survey of Journalism and Mass Communication Enrollments

Details

Pages
XXII, 264
ISBN (PDF)
9781433141492
ISBN (ePUB)
9781433141508
ISBN (MOBI)
9781433141515
ISBN (Softcover)
9781433141478
ISBN (Hardcover)
9781433141485
Language
English
Publication date
2018 (July)
Published
New York, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, Oxford, Wien, 2018. XXII, 264 pp., 48 b/w ill., 33 tables

Biographical notes

Lee B. Becker (Author) Tudor Vlad (Author)

Lee B. Becker earned his doctorate from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He is Professor Emeritus at the University of Georgia. He received the Paul J. Deutschmann Award for Excellence in Research Award from the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication. His publications include The Training and Hiring of Journalists. Tudor Vlad earned his doctorate from Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania. He is Director of the James M. Cox Jr. Center for International Mass Communication Training and Research at the University of Georgia. He has written on evaluation of international media assistance programs, media systems in emerging democracies, and journalism and mass communication curricula.

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