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Becoming a Great Inclusive Educator – Second edition

by Scot Danforth (Volume editor)
Textbook VIII, 368 Pages
Series: Disability Studies in Education, Volume 21

Summary

Becoming a Great Inclusive Educator, Second Edition offers educators the guidance and resources to become great inclusive educators by engaging in a powerful process of personal and professional transformation.  Inclusive education continues to grow in popularity and acceptance in the United States. But most teachers – general and special educators – are poorly prepared to be successful in inclusive classrooms and schools. Undoubtedly, the challenge to professionals involves the acquisition of new knowledge and skills. But inclusion requires far more. It calls upon educators to trouble everything they think they know about disability, to question their deepest ethical commitments, to take up the work of the Disability Rights Movement in the public schools, and to leap headlong into the deepest waters of the rich craft tradition of inclusive teaching.

Table Of Contents

  • Cover
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • About the editor
  • About the book
  • This eBook can be cited
  • Contents
  • Chapter One: Transformation
  • Section One: Foundations of Successful Inclusion
  • Chapter Two: Knowing Disability
  • Chapter Three: Teaching for the Disability Rights Movement
  • Chapter Four: What Is Best in the American Dream
  • Section Two: The Living Tradition of Inclusive Education Practice
  • Chapter Five: Collaboration and Co-teaching
  • Chapter Six: Friendships in the Classroom
  • Chapter Seven: Partnerships with Parents and Families
  • Chapter Eight: Encouraging Positive Behavior
  • Chapter Nine: Differentiated Instruction
  • Chapter Ten: School Reform
  • Section Three: Narratives of Inclusive Education Struggle and Success
  • Chapter Eleven: A Journey into Inclusive Education (Carrie D. Wysocki)
  • Chapter Twelve: It Takes a Whole School (Kimberly Millstead)
  • Chapter Thirteen: Using “Numbers and Narrative” to Support Inclusive Schooling (Meghan Cosier)
  • Chapter Fourteen: “It’s always about the kids, not us”: Successful Elementary Co-teaching (Zachary Rossetti)
  • Chapter Fifteen: Spilt Milk Counts: Belonging and Moving on Down the Hall… (Stacey Hodgins / S. Anthony Thompson)
  • Chapter Sixteen: Inclusive Education: A Messy and Liberating Venture (Emily Nusbaum)
  • Chapter Seventeen: “I don’t have a special world for her to live in: She has to adapt to this one”: On Becoming a Renaissance Middle Schooler (Alicia A. Broderick)
  • Chapter Eighteen: Including Talia: A Mother’s Tale (Kathy Kotel)
  • Chapter Nineteen: Respecting and Reaching All Learners in English Language Arts Classes: A Glimpse into a New York City High School (Fran Bittman / Sarah Bickens / David J. Connor)
  • Chapter Twenty: What 20+ Years of Secondary Inclusion Has Taught Us (Douglas Fisher / Nancy Frey)
  • Chapter Twenty-One: “Now, I’m part of the family […] well, almost!”: Family Matters for Schooling Success (John Colin / Srikala Naraian)
  • Chapter Twenty-Two: On the Ethical Meaning of Human Differences: A Non-Disabled Child in Inclusive Schools (Scot Danforth)
  • Chapter Twenty-Three: A Sense of Belonging: Student Perspectives on Inclusive Education (Rebecca Brooks)
  • Chapter Twenty-Four: Including Students with Developmental Disabilities: Simple, Not Easy (Michael F. Giangreco)
  • Chapter Twenty-Five: Conclusion—Old Habits, New Thinking
  • Series index

Becoming a Great
Inclusive Educator

Second Edition

Edited by Scot Danforth

About the editor

Scot Danforth is Professor and Assistant Dean of Research in the College of Educational Studies, Chapman University. He is a leading scholar in the fields of disability studies in education and inclusive education. His previous books include The Incomplete Child: An Intellectual History of Learning Disabilities, Vital Questions Facing Disability Studies in Education (co-edited with Susan Gabel), and Foundations of Inclusive Education Research (co-edited with Phyllis Jones).

About the book

This second edtion of Becoming a Great Inclusive Educator offers educators the guidance and resources to become great inclusive educators by engaging in a powerful process of personal and professional transformation. Inclusive education continues to grow in popularity and acceptance in the United States. But most teachers—general and special educators—are poorly prepared to be successful in inclusive classrooms and schools. Undoubtedly, the challenge to professionals involves the acquisition of new knowledge and skills. But inclusion requires far more. It calls upon educators to trouble everything they think they know about disability, to question their deepest ethical commitments, to take up the work of the Disability Rights Movement in the public schools, and to leap headlong into the deepest waters of the rich craft tradition of inclusive teaching.

PRAISE FOR THE FIRST EDITION OF Becoming a Great Inclusive Educator

“The best educators (and policy leaders, administrators, teachers, parents, students) know that in order to transform the lives of students everyone associated with schooling also requires transformation. In thoroughly captivating prose, Becoming a Great Inclusive Educator shows the way. Recognizing disability as a natural form of diversity, this book embraces struggle and exudes hopefulness. It is a richly drawn handbook that lays bare the history, theory, ethical underpinnings, caring practice, and everyday narratives of optimism in deeply imagined inclusive schooling that can make schools whole.”

—DOUGLAS P. BIKLEN, DEAN EMERITUS, SCHOOL OF EDUCATION, SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY

This eBook can be cited

This edition of the eBook can be cited. To enable this we have marked the start and end of a page. In cases where a word straddles a page break, the marker is placed inside the word at exactly the same position as in the physical book. This means that occasionally a word might be bifurcated by this marker.

contents

Contents


Chapter One: Transformation

Section One: Foundations of Successful Inclusion

Chapter Two: Knowing Disability

Chapter Three: Teaching for the Disability Rights Movement

Chapter Four: What Is Best in the American Dream

Section Two: The Living Tradition of Inclusive Education Practice

Chapter Five: Collaboration and Co-­teaching

Chapter Six: Friendships in the Classroom

Chapter Seven: Partnerships with Parents and Families

Chapter Eight: Encouraging Positive Behavior

Chapter Nine: Differentiated Instruction

Chapter Ten: School Reform

Section Three: Narratives of Inclusive Education Struggle and Success

Chapter Eleven: A Journey into Inclusive Education

Carrie D. Wysocki

Chapter Twelve: It Takes a Whole School

Kimberly Millstead ←vii | viii→

Chapter Thirteen: Using “Numbers and Narrative” to Support Inclusive Schooling

Meghan Cosier

Chapter Fourteen: “It’s always about the kids, not us”:
Successful Elementary Co-­teaching

Zachary Rossetti

Chapter Fifteen: Spilt Milk Counts: Belonging and Moving on Down the Hall…

Stacey Hodgins and S. Anthony Thompson

Chapter Sixteen: Inclusive Education: A Messy and Liberating Venture

Emily Nusbaum

Chapter Seventeen: “I don’t have a special world for her to live in: She has to adapt to this one”: On Becoming a Renaissance Middle Schooler

Alicia A. Broderick

Chapter Eighteen: Including Talia: A Mother’s Tale

Kathy Kotel

Chapter Nineteen: Respecting and Reaching All Learners in English Language Arts Classes: A Glimpse into a New York City High School

Fran Bittman, Sarah Bickens, & David J. Connor

Chapter Twenty: What 20+ Years of Secondary Inclusion Has Taught Us

Douglas Fisher and Nancy Frey

Chapter Twenty-One: “Now, I’m part of the family […] well, almost!”:

Family Matters for Schooling Success

John Colin and Srikala Naraian

Chapter Twenty-Two: On the Ethical Meaning of Human Differences:

A Non-­Disabled Child in Inclusive Schools

Scot Danforth

Chapter Twenty-Three: A Sense of Belonging:

Student Perspectives on Inclusive Education

Rebecca Brooks

Chapter Twenty-Four: Including Students with Developmental Disabilities:
Simple, Not Easy

Michael F. Giangreco

Chapter Twenty-Five: Conclusion—­Old Habits, New Thinking 353←viii | 1→

Transformation


Guiding Questions

What kind of personal and professional transformation is experienced by many of the best inclusive teachers?

How can you grow and develop into a great inclusive educator?

Neither society nor the public schools stand still. Social norms of attitude and action shift like enormous tectonic plates, often barely noticed in silent motion, sometimes smashing dramatically together to shake the ground beneath our feet. We are moved, as individuals and communities, and we begin to think, feel, and behave in new ways.

Inclusive education is a profound transformation of public schooling that has gained acceptance and widespread practice in the United States over the past two decades. Increasing numbers of students with disabilities are educated in general classrooms. The ground beneath concepts of disability and diversity in the schools has undoubtedly shifted in a positive direction, moving toward the acceptance of many forms of humanity into the common community.

But the public schools and general and special educators are often poorly prepared to be successful in the new configuration. Many teachers, veterans and rookies alike, are simply not ready to do inclusion well. In response to inclusion as the current challenge and opportunity for public school teachers, the most obvious question is also the most ambitious and hopeful: How can you be part of a positive transformation, both within yourself and within your school? How can you develop yourself into a great inclusive teacher?←1 | 2→

Then It All Changed

“I spent thirty eight years working for the Company. It was a great place to work.” The smile left Ida’s face. She looked away and sighed at the window. “But then it all changed.”

It was late August, 1983. I was on an Amtrak train traveling down the Atlantic Coast of the United States toward Virginia. I struck up a conversation with Ida, the elderly woman seated next to me. We had something in common. She had worked for many years for the Foxboro Company, a large manufacturer of industrial control systems located in my hometown in Massachusetts.

“What happened at the Company?” I hesitated to ask. It was evident that her emotions were still quite raw. But she seemed to want to talk about it.

“One Friday, I left the office just the way it was.” Her face quivered as she spoke. “When I returned at my desk on Monday morning, they had taken my typewriter away. My IBM Selectric, a beautiful machine. They brought in computers […] computer screens on every desk […].” Her voice trailed off.

I waited for her to continue. But she was silent. Her story was over. The day her employer replaced the typewriters with a computer system, she retired. She had worked very happily in a pre-­digital office environment for her entire adult life. The onset of advanced technology, from her perspective, ruined everything that she knew and loved about her job. It wasn’t just an exchange of office tools, a desktop monitor replacing an electric typewriter, that flipped her world upside down. It wasn’t just that old tasks would be carried out in a new way. It was a complete change in the very nature of the work. As far as Ida was concerned, her beloved job had ended.

From our historical vantage point, we can look at Ida’s situation and realize that she was confronted by the dramatic cultural shift that has been called the Computer Revolution (Berkeley, 1962) or the Digital Revolution (Collins & Halverson, 2009). Scholars have described this massive social change as matching the significance and impact of the Industrial Revolution. It wasn’t a matter of a single company buying some computers for their offices. The growth of computer technologies transformed all aspects of society, including communications, education, recreation, and commerce. Our way of life was effectively reprogrammed.

Ida didn’t know how to change herself to fit the demands of the new computer world. She didn’t know how to live this new way of life.

Increasingly, American teachers find themselves in Ida-­like shoes, overwhelmed by the educational changes brought about by what Ben Mattlin (2012) has called the “disability rights revolution.” Since the 1960s, the United States has gone through a dramatic social transformation, bringing disabled persons out of the shadows, offering them increasing measures of equality and dignity. Society is undergoing comprehensive redefinition. Our communities are inching toward←2 | 3→ a new normal whereby persons of many abilities and appearances share common spaces, activities, and interactions. The 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act, a broad anti-­discrimination law guaranteeing disabled persons equality and access to all strands of community life, is just one indication of the profound social change that has occurred and is still occurring.

Details

Pages
VIII, 368
ISBN (PDF)
9781433143441
ISBN (ePUB)
9781433143458
ISBN (MOBI)
9781433143465
ISBN (Softcover)
9781433134852
Language
English
Publication date
2017 (July)
Published
New York, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, Frankfurt am Main, Oxford, Wien, 2017. VIII, 368 pp.

Biographical notes

Scot Danforth (Volume editor)

Scot Danforth is Professor and Assistant Dean of Research, College of Educational Studies, Chapman University. He is a leading scholar in the fields of disability studies in education and inclusive education. His previous books include The Incomplete Child: An Intellectual History of Learning Disabilities, Vital Questions Facing Disability Studies in Education (co-edited with Susan Gabel), and Foundations of Inclusive Education Research (co-edited with Phyllis Jones).

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Title: Becoming a Great Inclusive Educator – Second edition