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Leading-Edge Research in Public Sector Innovation

Structure, Dynamics, Values and Outcomes

by Eleanor D. Glor (Volume editor)
Edited Collection XVIII, 474 Pages

Summary

Government and non-profit innovation has emerged as a strong cross-disciplinary research field with its own schools of study. Innovation is studied in fields and organizations that are open to trying out new policies, programs and processes. In twenty-two years of publication, The Innovation Journal: The Public Sector Innovation Journal (TIJ) has published papers and books discussing theory, practice, public policy and administration, health, education, all levels of government and other areas of study. Truly cross-disciplinary, it has been at the forefront of studying new practices and approaches such as leadership, employee empowerment, policy informatics and collaboration. Key TIJ papers are published in this book, including those most cited in scholarly work. TIJ has been a forum for discussion of theories, frameworks and evaluations of public sector innovation; it has demonstrated how interpretive, analytic, quantitative and demographic methods can be applied to public sector innovation and has guided governments to more effective policies. TIJ has not adopted a field or school; nonetheless, schools of study are represented here, such as adoption, diffusion and the effects and fate of innovations and their organizations, as are some of the best-known scholars of public sector innovation: Everett M. Rogers, James Iain Gow, Frances Westley and Eleanor D. Glor.

Table Of Content

  • Cover
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • About the author(s)/editor(s)
  • About the book
  • This eBook can be cited
  • Contents
  • Figures
  • Tables
  • 1 Introduction: Creating a Contemporary Public Innovation Discipline (Eleanor D. Glor)
  • The Innovation Journal: Publishing History
  • Comparison to Top-Ranking Public Administration Journals
  • Choosing Material for This Book
  • What is Included in This Volume
  • Bibliography
  • Appendix 1.1 Comparison of The Innovation Journal* to Public Sector Innovation Coverage by the Five Most-Cited** Public Administration Journals
  • Part I Innovation and Conceptual Frameworks
  • 2 Key Factors Influencing Innovation in Government (Eleanor D. Glor)
  • Introduction
  • Individual Motivation to Innovate
  • Organizational Culture and Innovation
  • Magnitude of Challenge
  • Discussion
  • Motivation and Innovation
  • Organizational Culture
  • Challenge
  • Are These the Right Factors?
  • Relationships among the Factors
  • The Relationship between Organizational and Societal Culture
  • Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • 3 A Framework for Studying the Impact of Innovation on Organizations, Organizational Populations, and Organizational Communities (Eleanor D. Glor)
  • Introduction
  • Organizational Concepts
  • Case Study Approach
  • Effects on People Approach
  • Functional Approach
  • Structural Approach
  • Research Approaches
  • Discussion
  • Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • Appendix 3.1: Research Framework for Studying Impacts of Innovation on Organizations, Populations and Communities
  • Part II Innovation and Ethics
  • 4 What Cannot Be Counted: Ethics, Innovation, and Evaluation in the Delivery of Public Services (Jessica Word / Christopher Stream / Kimberly Lukasiak)
  • Introduction
  • Accountability in Nonprofit Organizations
  • Evolution of Nonprofit Accountability
  • Types of Accountability
  • Ethical Issues of Accountability
  • Right-versus-Right Dilemmas
  • Truth versus Loyalty
  • Individual versus Community
  • Short-term versus Long-term
  • Justice versus Mercy
  • Resolving Two Rights
  • Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • 5 Consulting No One: Is Democratic Administration the Answer for First Nations? (Mai Nguyen)
  • Introduction
  • Accountability within the Democratic Administration Framework: Review of the Literature
  • Inferences from Data: The Political, Economic and Social Consequences
  • The Political Failures of Consultation
  • The Economic Failures of Consultation
  • The Social Failures of Consultation
  • Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • 6 The Process of Engagement: Examination of Management Values as a Change Strategy in Veterans Affairs Canada (Michael Miles)
  • Introduction
  • Method
  • Design of Questionnaire Instruments
  • Results
  • Analysis of New Initiatives Implemented Subsequent to Attendance at the MVS
  • Analysis of the Relationship between Attendance at the Seminar and Participant Willingness to Initiate Change Activity
  • Discussion
  • Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • Part III Leadership and Innovation
  • 7 Stewards, Mediators, and Catalysts: Toward a Model of Collaborative Leadership (Chris Ansell / Alison Gash)
  • Introduction
  • The Importance of Leadership for Collaborative Governance
  • Leadership Roles for the Collaborative Leader
  • Steward
  • Mediator
  • Catalyst
  • Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • 8 The Practice of Collective and Strategic Leadership in the Public Sector (Lilly Lemay)
  • Introduction
  • Individual Development of Leadership
  • Political Leader and Managerial Leader?
  • Individual or Collective Process? Transactional and Transformational Practice?
  • Methodology
  • Individual Development of Leadership: The Kuhnert and Lewis Model (1987)
  • Individual Leadership Development and the TOPI Model
  • Career Path and Stages of Individual Development of Leadership: The Case of a Senior Public Servant
  • The TOPI Model: Individual Dimension of Leadership
  • From Dyadic Leadership to Collective Leadership
  • The Cadastral Reform and Collective Leadership: Case and Discussion
  • The TOPI Model for Distributed and Strategic Leadership
  • Epilogue of the Case Study
  • Contributions, Limitations, and Avenues of Research
  • Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • Part IV Innovation and Collaboration
  • 9 Enhancing Public Sector Innovation: Examining the Network–Innovation Relationship (J. Travis Bland / Boris Bruk / Dongshin Kim / Kimberly Taylor Lee)
  • Introduction
  • Conceptual Framework
  • Public Sector Innovation: An Outcome
  • Public Sector Innovation: A Three-Stage Process
  • Previous Studies and Their Limitations
  • A New Approach: The Knowledge-Based View of Innovation
  • Networked Innovation: Potential Obstacles
  • Diversity of Inputs: The Failure to Communicate
  • Incongruent Goals: Balancing Multiple Interests
  • Coordination: No One’s in Charge
  • Case Study: The Texoma Regional Consortium
  • Methodology
  • Background Information
  • Analysis and Finding: Fostering Innovation
  • Mechanism I: Integration
  • Mechanism II: Dialogue
  • Mechanism III: Coordination
  • Discussion
  • Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • 10 Criteria for Developing Mediated Urban Nervous Systems: A Complex Adaptive Systems Perspective (Mary Ann Allison)
  • Introduction
  • Context: Cities Change in Punctuated Equilibrium
  • Periods of Comparative Equilibrium in Recent Social Evolution: Gemeinschaft, Gesellschaft, Gecyberschaft
  • Framework: The City as a Living, Complex Adaptive System
  • Selected Considerations in Developing Urban Nervous Systems
  • The Basics: Cybernetics, Feedback, and Feedforward
  • More than the Basics: Supporting Cooperation and Group Intelligence
  • Salient Implications for Mediated Urban Nervous Systems
  • Theory in Action
  • Conclusion
  • Notes
  • Bibliography
  • 11 Negotiating Collaborative Governance Designs: A Discursive Approach (Mie Plotnikof)
  • Introduction
  • Design and Implementation Issues in Collaborative Governance
  • Taking a Discursive Approach: Exploring Meaning Negotiations
  • Research Methods: Data Collection and Analysis
  • Findings
  • Negotiating the Emerging Collaborative Governance Designs: Bringing Ideas to Life
  • Negotiating the Implementation of a “Final” Design: Accomplishing the Marketplace
  • Discussion: Design as Ongoing Organizing
  • Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • Part V Innovative Approaches
  • 12 Making a Difference: Strategies for Scaling Social Innovation for Greater Impact (Frances Westley / Nino Antadze)
  • Defining Social Innovation
  • Making a Bigger Difference: Strategies for Scaling Out and Up
  • Market Mechanisms and Scaling Out
  • Beyond the Market Model for Social Innovation: Institutional Change through Scaling Up
  • Institutional Entrepreneurship: Scaling Up through Institutional Transformation
  • Conclusions
  • Bibliography
  • Part VI Diffusion of Innovations
  • 13 Complex Adaptive Systems and the Diffusion of Innovations (Everett M. Rogers / Una E. Medina / Mario A. Rivera / Cody J. Wiley)
  • Complex Adaptive Systems, Linearity, and Non-linearity
  • The Diffusion of Innovations Model
  • General Comparison of the Two Models
  • Comparing the Mathematical Foundations of the Two Models
  • Time Asymmetry and Reversibility in CAS and DIM
  • Variety, Reactivity and Heterophily in the Two Models
  • The Movement toward Criticality in CAS and DIM
  • Arrival at Self-Organized Criticality
  • The Micro Scale
  • The Macro Scale
  • Emergence and Feedback
  • Stop Aids
  • Analysis
  • Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • 14 Testing a Diffusion of Innovations in Education Model (DIEM) (Mark K. Warford)
  • Introduction
  • Diffusion of Educational Innovations and Its Origins
  • Review of the Literature
  • Antecedent Variables
  • Process
  • Consequences
  • Constructing the Model
  • Methodology
  • Results and Discussion
  • Conclusions
  • Bibliography
  • Part VII Innovation and Performance
  • 15 Public Policy, Intermediaries and Innovation System Performance: A Comparative Analysis of Québec and Ontario (Angelo Dossou-Yovo / Diane-Gabrielle Tremblay)
  • Introduction
  • Role of the Intermediaries and the Performance of the Microsystem of Innovation
  • Case Study: Comparative Cases of Québec and Ontario
  • Conditions of Innovation
  • Impact of Intermediaries
  • Discussion
  • Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • 16 Improving Performance and Accountability in Local Government with Citizen Participation (Michael J. Dougherty / Pamela D. Gibson Goff / Donald P. Lacy)
  • Introduction
  • Models of Community Planning and Engagement
  • Engaged Communities
  • Developing Patterns of Community Engagement
  • Bibliography
  • Part VIII Conclusion
  • 17 Public Sector Innovation Theory Revisited (James Iain Gow)
  • Introduction
  • Requirements of a Theory
  • Approaches to PSI
  • Everett M. Rogers
  • Sandford Borins
  • Robert Behn
  • Eleanor D. Glor
  • New Comparative Measurement Approach
  • Litigious Questions in PSI Theory
  • Definition of Innovation
  • Conceptual Approaches to Innovation
  • Outcomes and Results
  • Accountability and PSI
  • Creativity and Invention
  • Context
  • Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • Notes on Contributors
  • Index

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Figures

Eleanor D. Glor – Key Factors Influencing Innovation in Government

Figure 2.1: Innovation patterns, based on source of motivation, organizational culture, and magnitude of challenge.

Mai Nguyen – Consulting No One: Is Democratic Administration the Answer for First Nations?

Figure 5.1: Accountability within the democratic administration framework.

Lilly Lemay – The Practice of Collective and Strategic Leadership in the Public Sector

Figure 8.1: The collective practice of leadership.

J. Travis Bland, Boris Bruk, Dongshin Kim, and Kimberly Taylor Lee – Enhancing Public Sector Innovation: Examining the Network–Innovation Relationship

Figure 9.1: The stages of the innovation process.

Frances Westley and Nino Antadze – Making a Difference: Strategies for Scaling Social Innovation for Greater Impact

Figure 12.1: A systemic view of innovation.

Figure 12.2: The relationship between resilience, re-engagement of vulnerable populations, and social innovation. ← xi | xii →

Figure 12.3: The adaptive cycle: A theory of the relationship of transformation to resilience in complex systems.

Figure 12.4: A spectrum of models of social innovation growth.

Figure 12.5: Three interactive dynamics affecting the relationship between supply and demand for social innovations.

Figure 12.6: Cross-scale interaction.

Everett M. Rogers, Una E. Medina, Mario A. Rivera, and Cody J. Wiley – Complex Adaptive Systems and the Diffusion of Innovations

Figure 13.1: Normal distribution diffusion curve.

Figure 13.2: Cumulative diffusion (“S”) curve.

Figure 13.3: Distribution for the diffusion of innovations model.

Figure 13.4: Distribution for the complex adaptive systems model.

Figure 13.5: Changes in new HIV infections in San Francisco between 1977 and 2000 showing advent of STOP AIDS coinciding with decrease in new infections.

Figure 13.6: Power law fit between log of new HIV cases and log of time elapsed since STOP AIDS.

Mark K. Warford – Testing a Diffusion of Innovations in Education Model (DIEM)

Figure 14.1: Diffusion of Innovations in Education Model (DIEM). ← xii | xiii →

Angelo Dossou-Yovo and Diane-Gabrielle Tremblay – Public Policy, Intermediaries, and Innovation System Performance: A Comparative Analysis of Québec and Ontario

Figure 15.1: National innovation system.

Figure 15.2: Microsystem of innovation.

Figure 15.3: Type of innovation by region.

Figure 15.4: Organizations used as a source of information for process and product innovation by innovating firms.

Figure 15.5: Availability of competences for process and product innovation.

Figure 15.6: Success factors (medium to high importance) for process and product innovation – I.

Figure 15.7: Success factors (medium to high importance) for process and product innovation – II.

Figure 15.8: Methods of intellectual property protection.

Figure 15.9: Obstacles (medium to high importance) for process and product innovation – III.

Figure 15.10: Success factors (medium to high importance) for process and product innovation – III.

Figure 15.11: Use of governmental assistance.

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Tables

Eleanor D. Glor – Key Factors Influencing Innovation in Government

Table 2.1: Degrees of Organizational Change

Table 2.2: Rogers’ Variables Determining the Rate of Adoption of Innovations

Eleanor D. Glor – A Framework for Studying the Impact of Innovation on Organizations, Organizational Populations, and Organizational Communities

Table 3.1: Research Approaches

Michael Miles – The Process of Engagement: Examination of Management Values as a Change Strategy in Veterans Affairs Canada

Table 6.1: Veterans Affairs Organization Renewal Strategy

Table 6.2: MVS Seminar Attendance and Initial Management Follow-Up

Table 6.3: Change Initiatives Undertaken Subsequent to MVS

Table 6.4: Perceived Usefulness of Topics Covered in the MVS

Table 6.5: New Practices Reflecting MVS Content Introduced into the Workplace

Table 6.6: Participant Perception of Motivational Impact of MVS on Introduction of Change Initiatives

Table 6.7: Cross-Tabulation of Participant Self-Reports of Implementation of Change Initiative and Motivational Impact of Seminar ← xv | xvi →

Chris Ansell and Alison Gash – Stewards, Mediators, and Catalysts: Toward a Model of Collaborative Leadership

Table 7.1: Collaborative Leadership Roles

Lilly Lemay – The Practice of Collective and Strategic Leadership in the Public Sector

Table 8.1: Leadership Stages and Personal Evolution

Table 8.2: Individual Development of Leadership in Public Management

J. Travis Bland, Boris Bruk, Dongshin Kim, and Kimberly Taylor Lee – Enhancing Public Sector Innovation: Examining the Network–Innovation Relationship

Table 9.1: Organizational Conditions Thought to Facilitate Innovation

Mary Ann Allison – Criteria for Developing Mediated Urban Nervous Systems: A Complex Adaptive Systems Perspective

Table 10.1: Characteristics of Living Complex Adaptive Cities with Salient Implications for Healthy Cities245–

Table 10.2: Examples of Collaboration, Feedback, and Feedforward in ICT248–

Mark K. Warford – Testing a Diffusion of Innovations in Education Model (DIEM)

Table 14.1: Comparison of Survey Return Rate State-by-State

Table 14.2: Respondents’ Ratings of Proficiency-Oriented Instruction ← xvi | xvii →

Table 14.3: Results of t-Test for Independent Samples Comparing Florida with Other States’ Average Scale. Measures of the ACTFL Guidelines’ Impact (Equal Variances Assumed)

Table 14.4: Results of Chi Square Test of Variables of Adoption and Implementation versus Professional Background Factors

Appendices

Appendix 1.1: Comparison of The Innovation Journal to Public Sector Innovation Coverage by the Five Most-Cited Public Administration Journals

Appendix 3.1: Research Framework for Studying Impacts of Innovation on Organizations, Populations and Communities

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ELEANOR D. GLOR

1 Introduction: Creating a Contemporary Public Innovation Discipline

Government and nonprofit sector (public sector) innovation has been studied since the 1950s and has emerged into a strong cross-disciplinary research field, with its own schools of study. Innovation is studied in fields and organizations that are open to trying out new policies, programs or processes. During its publication since 1995, The Innovation Journal: The Public Sector Innovation Journal (TIJ), an electronic journal (<http://www.innovation.cc>), has published papers and books discussing theory, practice, public policy and administration, health, education, international/national/provincial/local governments and many other subjects. It has been in the forefront of studying new practices and approaches such as leadership, employee empowerment, policy informatics and collaboration. It is truly cross-disciplinary. This volume brings together sixteen essays originally published in TIJ.

TIJ has been a forum for discussion of theories, frameworks, and evaluations of public sector innovation; has demonstrated how interpretive, analytic, quantitative, and demographic methods can be applied to public sector innovation; and it has guided governments to more effective policies. TIJ has not adopted a field nor a school. Rather, it has published on a range of theories, subjects, and approaches. Nonetheless, it is now becoming clear that schools of study of public sector innovation are emerging. I am aware of several.

Early scholarly interest was in the creation and early adoption of innovations. This work began with study of the adoption of new ideas, practices, and technologies by American Midwestern farmers (e.g. Rogers, 1958). Innovators were considered the first few to adopt innovations in their systems (Rogers, 1995: 22). The Innovation Journal published two ← 1 | 2 → articles by Everett Rogers (“Complex Adaptive Systems and the Diffusion of Innovations” and “Evaluating Public Sector Innovation in Networks: Extending the Reach of the National Cancer Institute’s Web-based Health Communication Intervention Research Initiative”). He was also a member of the Editorial Board of The Innovation Journal for several years. “Complex Adaptive Systems” is included in this volume.

Interest in the adoption of innovations led to studies of innovative state and provincial governments such as Minnesota, U.S.A (e.g. Poole, Van de Ven, Dooley and Holmes, 2000) and Saskatchewan, Canada (e.g. Glor, 1997, 2002). Interest in policy and program innovations was followed by interest in the innovation process and the observation of the S-curve of adoption (Rogers, 1995), published in the communications literature.

Interest in the adoption of innovation also developed into an interest in the dissemination or diffusion of policy innovations (Berry and Berry, 2013) and its communication (e.g. Rogers, 1995). Substantial quantitative research was conducted on the adoption of management innovations in local governments in the United Kingdom (Walker, 2006; Hartley, 2008) and the United States (e.g. Damanpour and Schneider, 2006; Walker, Damanpour, Devece, 2010). It used a different definition of innovation as an idea, practice or object that is perceived as new by an individual or other unit of adoption (Rogers, 1995, 11). Mark K. Warford, in Chapter 14 describes the history of the very early use of this definition and of the history of dissemination of innovation research.

Glor (2013), studying organizations implementing innovations, defined this approach to innovation as something new to the organization. As each policy, program or process that was new to the organization was adopted, it was considered an innovation. Other scholars also studied diffusion of policy innovations, especially among the American states (e.g. Walker, 1968; Gray, 1973; Berry and Berry, 1990; 1992; 2013), published primarily in political science journals. During the 1990s, the Ford Foundation funded innovation awards in five regions of the world (see more below). The Institute of Public Administration of Canada and the Commonwealth Association also introduced innovation awards. A number of scholars studied the results of awards in Canada (Glor, 1998; Bernier, 2014), the U.S.A (Borins, 1998), the United Kingdom (Hartley, 2008), and Brazil (Simtes and Goulart, 2006). ← 2 | 3 →

Most recently, interest in innovation has in some ways been replaced by interest in resilience. There are ways in which this is a more ideological approach. The City of Toronto, for example, under a right-wing mayor, implemented a resilience initiative as part of the 100 Resilient Cities pioneered by the Rockefeller Foundation. In an advertisement for a Chief Resilience Officer, it directed employees to support cutbacks and staff cuts, saying: “Lead the comprehensive assessment of current policy, planning and resilience activities, creating a compelling vision for Toronto’s Resilience Strategy to drive engagement, understanding and commitment across all relevant community sectors” (advertisement circulated by the Institute of Public Administration of Canada, December 16, 2016). TIJ has published a number of articles on resilience, such as “Building Resilience in Public Organizations: The Role of Waste and Bricolage” by Steven Van de Walle (2014); “Innovation in the public sector: spare tyres and fourth plinths” by Wayne Parsons (2006); and “Protecting the Internet from Dictators: Technical and Policy Solutions to Ensure Online Freedoms” by Warigia Bowman and L. Jean Camp (2013).

These topics were paralleled by an interest in identifying the effects of innovation. Everett Rogers’ two articles in TIJ were occupied with this. Eleanor D. Glor has laid out an agenda for research on the fate of innovations and their organizations. She has looked at them generally and when they change (summarized by Baum, 1996; Glor, 2013). This literature has been published primarily in the organizational studies journals. Scholars who studied organizational fate in government typically relied on government records, for example, United States Government Manual1 and surveys of local governments in the United Kingdom (e.g. Walker, 2006; Hartley, 2008). Interest was also shown in the factors affecting those fates (summarized in Glor, 2013).

Throughout this scholarly history, there was an ongoing interest in individual innovations and their adoption (e.g. Simtes and Goulart, 2006; Ferreira, Farah and Spink, 2008 [Brazil]). A number of these authors came out of the Harvard School, which focuses on case studies, often using data ← 3 | 4 → derived from public sector innovation awards. Many of these awards were funded by the Ford Foundation, which funded five innovation awards (e.g. Harvard, U.S.A Native Indian awards, Brazil, Philippines, South Africa). Sandford Borins, for example, studied groups of innovations, especially innovation award nominees, finalists, and winners (e.g. 1998, 2000). He argued that awards have identified enough innovations that the populations can be considered representative of public sector innovations generally (Borins, 2001). I disagree, and consider that innovation award finalists and winners may be an elite group of innovations and organizations which have more support from management and governments, more recognition, and may be more likely to survive longer than the average innovation. TIJ has published articles arguing that the demographics of adoption and effects of innovations on their target groups, organizations, communities, and populations need more study, especially effects on their populations (a population is, for example, all nonprofit day care centers in a region) (e.g. Glor, 2014; Glor and Rivera, 2015).

Eventually scholars grew interested in the impact of innovations. Mario Rivera, for many years the Senior Associate Editor of The Innovation Journal, was particularly interested in this topic, for example, in “Evaluating Public Sector Innovation in Networks: The National Cancer Institute’s Web-Based Health Communication Intervention Research Initiative” (<http://www.innovation.cc/volumes-issues/vol9-iss3.html>).

No profile of public sector innovation research would be complete without a word about the iconoclasts. James Iain Gow (2014), in the Conclusion to this book, reviews and critiques a number of public sector innovation scholars. He sees Robert Behn as the main critic of public sector innovation, however. Behn’s notions – managing by groping along and most of the knowledge needed to innovate being tacit – challenge the capacity for developing a field of innovation studies. (Gow, 2014: 6–7 (Chapter 17, this volume)). Howard A. Doughty too has been critical of innovation, especially its politics.

TIJ has published material from many of these schools. While the popularity of topics has in some cases come and gone, these topics remain of value in any attempt to understand public sector innovation. TIJ’s contribution is important because it is the only journal publishing exclusively on public sector innovation, it publishes in both journal article and book ← 4 | 5 → form, it publishes in both English and French, and it provides a specific contribution because it focuses only on that subject.

The Innovation Journal: Publishing History

Up to volume 22, issue 1, 2017, publishing three times per year, and four in one year, in total TIJ has published (<http://www.innovation.cc/all-issues.htm>):

5 books

22 introductions

253 peer-reviewed (scholarly style) papers

149 discussion papers

66 case studies

22 review essays

195 book reviews

This is a total of 712 publications on public sector innovation in twenty-two years.

Comparison to Top-Ranking Public Administration Journals

Other journals also publish on public sector innovation. Scopus’ SCImago uses the same method to identify citation of journals as Thompson-Reuters. As of the end of 2015 it identified the five electronic2 journals ← 5 | 6 → in public administration receiving the most citations as Administrative Science Quarterly, Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, Educational Administration Research and Theory, Public Administration Review and Governance, in that ranking.3 Their articles on public sector innovation were reviewed as of fall 2016.

Administrative Science Quarterly publishes on all sectors, not just the public sector. A review of its forty most recent articles on innovation revealed none on public sector innovation.

Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory published a total of fifteen articles on innovation, eleven relevant to public sector innovation. TIJ published 465.

Educational Administration Quarterly published no articles on public sector educational innovation. TIJ published two special issues on education, totalling sixteen articles.

Public Administration Review published sixteen articles on public sector innovation from 1995 to 2015, the period parallel to the period when TIJ published (1995 to 2016).

Governance published seven articles with “innovation” in their titles since it began publishing in 1998.

Details

Pages
XVIII, 474
ISBN (PDF)
9781787076631
ISBN (ePUB)
9781787076648
ISBN (MOBI)
9781787076655
ISBN (Hardcover)
9781787076624
Language
English
Publication date
2018 (January)
Tags
Public sector innovation government innovation innovative processes
Published
Oxford, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, Frankfurt am Main, New York, Wien, 2018. XVIII, 492 pp., 20 tables, 28 fig.

Biographical notes

Eleanor D. Glor (Volume editor)

Eleanor D. Glor is Fellow at McLaughlin College, York University, Toronto, and the publisher and founding editor of The Innovation Journal, for which she has chaired the Innovation Salon for ten years. She has spent her working life as a public servant in the Canadian public sector at four levels and has written about public sector innovation for publication since the 1980s. Most recently, she has published «Studying Factors Affecting Creation and Fate of Innovations and Their Organizations – I: A New Instrument» (The Innovation Journal, 22(2), 2017) and Building Theory of Organizational Innovation, Change, Fitness and Survival (The Innovation Journal, 2015).

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Title: Leading-Edge Research in Public Sector Innovation