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Media Scholarship in a Transitional Age

Research in Honor of Pamela J. Shoemaker

by Carol M. Liebler (Volume editor) Tim P. Vos (Volume editor)
Edited Collection XVIII, 338 Pages

Summary

Media Scholarship in a Transitional Age honors the significant and lasting contribution that Pamela J. Shoemaker has made to mass communications research. Her body of work, spanning four decades, has included groundbreaking conceptual and methodological advances, particularly in the areas of gatekeeping, survey research and content analysis. The chapters in this collection build upon her legacy in both theory and method, and particularly in the area of news research. At the heart of the book are chapters that apply concepts found in Shoemaker’s earliest work, such as deviance and newsworthiness, and extend theories such as gatekeeping and agenda-setting into the digital era. Empirical analyses on topics such as international and political news provide insights into journalism in these transitional times. Additional chapters explore digital media and the "mediated method." The closing section, Reflections on the Transitional Age, includes two chapters that pay homage to Shoemaker’s contributions through discussion of the importance of theory and research from a personal perspective. The final chapter challenges academics to consider the implications of the digital era for scholarly creativity.
A collection with wide appeal to all media scholars, Media Scholarship in a Transitional Age is particularly well-suited to graduate student seminars on mass communications theory, media sociology and news scholarship.

Table Of Contents

  • Cover
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • About the editors
  • About the book
  • This eBook can be cited
  • Table of Contents
  • Figures
  • Tables
  • Acknowledgements
  • Foreword (Michael Roloff)
  • Chapter One: Introduction: Examining Media in a Transitional Age (Tim P. Vos / Carol M. Liebler)
  • Theorizing the Transitional Age
  • Chapter Two: Social Change in the Networked Information Age (Hyunjin Seo)
  • Chapter Three: Online Incivility and Public Deliberation (Gina Masullo Chen)
  • Chapter Four: Influences of Audience Feedback on News Content in Traditional and New Media: A Theoretical Evaluation [Gang (Kevin) Han / Josh Shear]
  • Chapter Five: Journalism, Rationality and Common Sense: A Theoretical Model for Relations Between News Selection and Cultural Construction of Everyday Regularity (Marcos Paulo da Silva)
  • Chapter Six: Deviance, Social Significance, and International Public Relations: A Synthesized View of Influencing Factors on National Image in News (Suman Lee)
  • Chapter Seven: Communication Research as a “Great Crossroads”: Bridging Fields of Social Science (Dominic L. Lasorsa)
  • Chapter Eight: Mediating the Digital Message: Agenda-Setting Theory in Modern Russian Media (Elena Vartanova)
  • The Empirical Landscape in a Transitional Age
  • Chapter Nine: The World through the Eyes of the New York Times and People’s Daily: A Network Agenda-Setting Analysis of Psychological Geography (Maxwell McCombs / Pei Zheng / Paro Pain)
  • Chapter Ten: Geographical Difference in Media Effects on Political Discussion in China: Economy, Cultural Characteristics and Social Trust (Di Zhang / Shuya Pan / Xiuli Wang)
  • Chapter Eleven: Israelis and Foreign News: A 25-year Follow-up on Interest and Perceived Functions (Akiba A. Cohen)
  • Chapter Twelve: Network Analyses of Attention to Deviance and Social Significance Based on Gene and Culture Co-Evolution Theory (Jong Hyuk Lee / Yun Jung Choi)
  • Chapter Thirteen: From Gatekeeping to Bridge-Keeping: Gatekeeping Theory through the Lens of Micro-Documentary (Nick Michael / Tim P. Vos)
  • Chapter Fourteen: Stuck in the Second Tier: News Coverage of the Non-Frontrunners in the 2012 Presidential Campaign (Elizabeth A. Skewes)
  • Chapter Fifteen: The Psychometry of Sexting: Non-Normative Psychic Desire as a Predictor of Sexual Text Message Engagement (John Wolf)
  • The “Mediated” Method
  • Chapter Sixteen: Documenting the “Mediated Message”: The Art and Science of Content Analysis Research (Erica Scharrer)
  • Chapter Seventeen: Just the Facts, Ma’am: Merging Media Content Analysis with Survey Research (Michael J. Breen)
  • Chapter Eighteen: Content Analysis and Social Justice: Mediated Erasure and News Coverage of Missing Children (Carol M. Liebler)
  • Reflections on the Transitional Age
  • Chapter Nineteen: Sixty Years of Challenging Dubious Conclusions (Guido H. Stempel III)
  • Chapter Twenty: Queen Bees, Beekeepers, Hives and Ecosystems: The Social Forces Influencing Gender and Diversity in Public Relations and Communication Management (Brenda J. Wrigley)
  • Chapter Twenty-One: The Intellectual Craftsman in a Digital World (Stephen D. Reese)
  • Contributors
  • Index
  • Series index

Media Scholarship in a
Transitional Age

Research in Honor of
Pamela J. Shoemaker

Carol M. Liebler and Tim P. Vos, Editors

About the editors

Carol M. Liebler (Ph.D., University of Wisconsin–Madison) is Professor in the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communication at Syracuse University. She has authored a wide variety of journal articles on media and diversity, primarily from a media sociological perspective.

Tim P. Vos (Ph.D., Syracuse University) is Chair and Associate Professor of Journalism Studies and Coordinator of Global Research Initiatives at the University of Missouri School of Journalism. He is co-author of Gatekeeping Theory (2009) and co-editor of Gatekeeping in Transition (2015).

About the book

Media Scholarship in a Transitional Age honors the significant and lasting contribution that Pamela J. Shoemaker has made to mass communications research. Her body of work, spanning four decades, has included groundbreaking conceptual and methodological advances, particularly in the areas of gatekeeping, survey research and content analysis. The chapters in this collection build upon her legacy in both theory and method, and particularly in the area of news research. At the heart of the book are chapters that apply concepts found in Shoemaker’s earliest work, such as deviance and newsworthiness, and extend theories such as gatekeeping and agenda-setting into the digital era. Empirical analyses on topics such as international and political news provide insights into journalism in these transitional times. Additional chapters explore digital media and the “mediated method.” The closing section, Reflections on the Transitional Age, includes two chapters that pay homage to Shoemaker’s contributions through discussion of the importance of theory and research from a personal perspective. The final chapter challenges academics to consider the implications of the digital era for scholarly creativity.

A collection with wide appeal to all media scholars, Media Scholarship in a Transitional Age is particularly well-suited to graduate student seminars on mass communications theory, media sociology and news scholarship.

This eBook can be cited

This edition of the eBook can be cited. To enable this we have marked the start and end of a page. In cases where a word straddles a page break, the marker is placed inside the word at exactly the same position as in the physical book. This means that occasionally a word might be bifurcated by this marker.

chapter

Table of Contents


Figures

Tables

Acknowledgements

Foreword

Michael Roloff

Chapter One: Introduction: Examining Media in a Transitional Age

Tim P. Vos and Carol M. Liebler

Theorizing the Transitional Age

Chapter Two: Social Change in the Networked Information Age

Hyunjin Seo

Chapter Three: Online Incivility and Public Deliberation

Gina Masullo Chen

Chapter Four: Influences of Audience Feedback on News Content in Traditional and New Media: A Theoretical Evaluation

Gang (Kevin) Han and Josh Shear←vii | viii→

Chapter Five: Journalism, Rationality and Common Sense: A Theoretical Model for Relations Between News Selection and Cultural Construction of Everyday Regularity

Marcos Paulo da Silva

Chapter Six: Deviance, Social Significance, and International Public Relations: A Synthesized View of Influencing Factors on National Image in News

Suman Lee

Chapter Seven: Communication Research as a “Great Crossroads”: Bridging Fields of Social Science

Dominic L. Lasorsa

Chapter Eight: Mediating the Digital Message: Agenda-Setting Theory in Modern Russian Media

Elena Vartanova

The Empirical Landscape in a Transitional Age

Chapter Nine: The World through the Eyes of the New York Times and People’s Daily: A Network Agenda-Setting Analysis of Psychological Geography

Maxwell McCombs, Pei Zheng, and Paro Pain

Chapter Ten: Geographical Difference in Media Effects on Political Discussion in China: Economy, Cultural Characteristics and Social Trust

Di Zhang, Shuya Pan, and Xiuli Wang

Chapter Eleven: Israelis and Foreign News: A 25-year Follow-up on Interest and Perceived Functions

Akiba A. Cohen

Chapter Twelve: Network Analyses of Attention to Deviance and Social Significance Based on Gene and Culture Co-Evolution Theory

Jong Hyuk Lee and Yun Jung Choi

Chapter Thirteen: From Gatekeeping to Bridge-Keeping: Gatekeeping Theory through the Lens of Micro-Documentary

Nick Michael and Tim P. Vos

Chapter Fourteen: Stuck in the Second Tier: News Coverage of the Non-Frontrunners in the 2012 Presidential Campaign

Elizabeth A. Skewes

Chapter Fifteen: The Psychometry of Sexting: Non-Normative Psychic Desire as a Predictor of Sexual Text Message Engagement

John Wolf←viii | ix→

The “Mediated” Method

Chapter Sixteen: Documenting the “Mediated Message”: The Art and Science of Content Analysis Research

Erica Scharrer

Chapter Seventeen: Just the Facts, Ma’am: Merging Media Content Analysis with Survey Research

Michael J. Breen

Chapter Eighteen: Content Analysis and Social Justice: Mediated Erasure and News Coverage of Missing Children

Carol M. Liebler

Reflections on the Transitional Age

Chapter Nineteen: Sixty Years of Challenging Dubious Conclusions

Guido H. Stempel III

Chapter Twenty: Queen Bees, Beekeepers, Hives and Ecosystems: The Social Forces Influencing Gender and Diversity in Public Relations and Communication Management

Brenda J. Wrigley

Chapter Twenty-One: The Intellectual Craftsman in a Digital World

Stephen D. Reese

Contributors

Index ←ix | x→ ←x | xi→

chapter

Figures


Figure 4.1: Feedback Mechanisms

Figure 4.2: The Modified Shannon-Weaver Information Model of Communication

Figure 4.3: Direct Feedback and Indirect Feedback Affecting News Content

Figure 4.4: Hypothesized Relationship Between Feedback Type and Feedback Influence on News Stories

Figure 4.5: Hypothesized Relationship Between the Number of Privileged Forms of Feedback and the Amount of Content from Feedback that is Included in a News Story

Figure 4.6: Hypothesized Relationship Between the Number of Privileged Forms of Feedback and the Number of Times Feedback Appears as Content in News Stories

Figure 4.7: Hypothesized Relationship Between the Number of Feedback Categories and the Amount of Feedback Included as Content in News Stories

Figure 4.8: Hypothesized Relationship Between the Number of Feedback Categories and the Number of Times Feedback Appears as Content in News Stories

Figure 4.9: Hypothesized Relationship Between the Number of News Determinants and the Amount of Feedback Included as Content in News Stories ←xi | xii→

Figure 4.10: Hypothesized Relationship Between the Number of News Determinants and the Number of Times Feedback Appears as Content in News Stories

Figure 5.1: Representation of Transcoding and Dissemination Relations of Instrumental Rationality Pattern by the News Narrative

Figure 5.2: Graph Model for the Relation Between Journalism, Doxa and Paradoxes

Figure 5.3: Graphic Representation of the Main Theoretical and Conceptual Relationships

Figure 9.1: Geographic Network of the New York Times

Figure 9.2: Geographic Network of the Peoples Daily

Figure 12.1: Networks of Seven Variables of Deviance and Social Significance

Figure 12.2: Networks of Eight Groups of Different Attention Levels

Figure 12.3: Network Density and Centralization of Groups with Different Attention Levels ←xii | xiii→

Details

Pages
XVIII, 338
ISBN (PDF)
9781433147784
ISBN (ePUB)
9781433147791
ISBN (MOBI)
9781433147807
ISBN (Softcover)
9781433147777
ISBN (Hardcover)
9781433147722
Language
English
Publication date
2018 (February)
Published
New York, Bern, Berlin, Brussels, Vienna, Oxford, Warsaw, 2018. XVIII, 338 pp., 18 b/w ill., 26 tbl.

Biographical notes

Carol M. Liebler (Volume editor) Tim P. Vos (Volume editor)

Carol M. Liebler (Ph.D., University of Wisconsin–Madison) is Professor in the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communication at Syracuse University. She has authored a wide variety of journal articles on media and diversity, primarily from a media sociological perspective. Tim P. Vos (Ph.D., Syracuse University) is Chair and Associate Professor of Journalism Studies and Coordinator of Global Research Initiatives at the University of Missouri School of Journalism. He is co-author of Gatekeeping Theory (2009) and co-editor of Gatekeeping in Transition (2015).

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