Loading...

Dostoevsky and the Realists

Dickens, Flaubert, Tolstoy

by Slobodanka M. Vladiv-Glover (Author)
©2019 Monographs 216 Pages

Summary

Dostoevsky and the Realists: Dickens, Flaubert, Tolstoy​ offers a radical redefinition of Realism as a historical phenomenon, grounded in the literary manifestoes of the 1840s in three national literary canons (English, French and Russian) which issue a call to writers to record the manners and mores of their societies for posterity and thus to become "local historians." The sketch of manners becomes the instituting genre of Realism but is transformed in the major novels of the Realists into history as genealogy and into a phenomenology of modern subjectivity. Dickens, Flaubert and Tolstoy are brought into relation with Dostoevsky via a shared poetics as well as through a deconstructive and/or psychoanalytic analysis of their respective novels, which are interpreted in the context of various doctrines of Beauty, including Dostoevsky’s own artistic credo of 1860. In this broad context of European aesthetics and the European literary canon, Dostoevsky’s own view of history is illuminated in a new perspective, in which his concept of the "soil" is stripped of its conservative mask behind which emerges a (post-exile) Dostoevsky with socialist, pan-European views. The portrait of Dostoevsky which thus emerges from the present study is that of a European writer with a radically modern aesthetics and with a progressivist political orientation which is in consonance with his pre-exile affiliation with utopian socialism.

Table Of Contents


Slobodanka M. Vladiv-Glover

Dostoevsky and the Realists

Dickens, Flaubert, Tolstoy

About the author

Slobodanka Vladiv-Glover is Adjunct Associate Professor (Research) in the School of Languages, Literatures, Cultures and Linguistics at Monash University (Melbourne, Australia). She taught in Monash’s Slavic Studies and the Centre for Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies until 2013. Apart from Dostoevsky, her research is in the poetics of Modernism and Postmodernism in Russian and Slavic literatures, in the context of European phenomenology and psychoanalytic theory. She is a co-author of Russian Postmodernism: New Perspectives on Post-Soviet Culture (1999 and 2016) with Mikhail Epstein and Alexander Genis. She is on the executive boards of the Australasian Association for Communist and Post-communist Studies (AACPCS) and the North American Serbian Studies Society (NASSS) and is regional representative for Australia of the International Dostoevsky Society (IDS). She is chief editor of The Dostoevsky Journal: A Comparative Literature Review.

About the book

Dostoevsky and the Realists: Dickens, Flaubert, Tolstoy offers a radical redefinition of Realism as a historical phenomenon, grounded in the literary manifestoes of the 1840s in three national literary canons (English, French and Russian) which issue a call to writers to record the manners and mores of their societies for posterity and thus to become “local historians.” The sketch of manners becomes the instituting genre of Realism but is transformed in the major novels of the Realists into history as genealogy and into a phenomenology of modern subjectivity. Dickens, Flaubert and Tolstoy are brought into relation with Dostoevsky via a shared poetics as well as through a deconstructive and/or psychoanalytic analysis of their respective novels, which are interpreted in the context of various doctrines of Beauty, including Dostoevsky’s own artistic credo of 1860. In this broad context of European aesthetics and the European literary canon, Dostoevsky’s own view of history is illuminated in a new perspective, in which his concept of the “soil” is stripped of its conservative mask behind which emerges a (post-exile) Dostoevsky with socialist, pan-European views. The portrait of Dostoevsky which thus emerges from the present study is that of a European writer with a radically modern aesthetics and with a progressivist political orientation which is in consonance with his pre-exile affiliation with utopian socialism.

This eBook can be cited

This edition of the eBook can be cited. To enable this we have marked the start and end of a page. In cases where a word straddles a page break, the marker is placed inside the word at exactly the same position as in the physical book. This means that occasionally a word might be bifurcated by this marker.

Acknowledgements

In the writing of this book, I was assisted by discussions with colleagues from Hungary and New Zealand, Dr Géza S. Horváth (Pázmány Péter Catholic University) and Dr Irene Zohrab (Victoria University of Wellington), whose feedback on my Dostoevsky research and encouragement was invaluable. I also wish to thank the Ada Booth Slavic Librarian at Monash University, Ms Anna Rubinowski for assisting with my library requests. I would like to express my debt to my University of Melbourne mentor, the late Dr Dmitry Vladimirovich Grishin, whose work on the young Dostoevsky still informs my own research, as well as to Professor Wolf Schmid (Hamburg University), who offered encouraging comments at the Bakhtin 120 Conference (Vezsprem, 2015). I also wish to thank my student, Dr Lara Jakica, for helping with the bibliography. Finally, I owe thanks to Meagan Simpson, the Commissioning Editor of Peter Lang Publishing (NY), for her systematic support of this project.←xi | xii→ ←xii | 1→

Introduction

Dostoevsky and the Realists:
Dickens, Flaubert, Tolstoy

Denn dies Innerliche ist glaichfalls, wie die Bilder der Aussendinge, ein im Bewusstsein Vorhandenes und geht in seiner Unabhängigkeit von dem Äusserlichen von sich selbst aus. Ist nun die Bedeutung in dieser Weise das Anfangende, so erscheint der Ausdruck, die Realität, als das Mittel, das aus der konkreten Welt herbeigenommen wird, um die Bedeuting als den abstrakten Inhalt vorstellig, anschaulich und sinnlich zu machen.

G. W. F. Hegel, Vorlesungen über die Ästhetik I1

Details

Pages
216
Year
2019
ISBN (PDF)
9781433152252
ISBN (ePUB)
9781433152269
ISBN (MOBI)
9781433152276
ISBN (Hardcover)
9781433152238
DOI
10.3726/b14603
Language
English
Publication date
2019 (March)
Published
New York, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, Oxford, Wien, 2019. XII, 216 pp., 4 b/w ill.

Biographical notes

Slobodanka M. Vladiv-Glover (Author)

Slobodanka Vladiv-Glover is Adjunct Associate Professor (Research) in the School of Languages, Literatures, Cultures and Linguistics at Monash University (Melbourne, Australia). She taught in Monash’s Slavic Studies and the Centre for Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies until 2013. Apart from Dostoevsky, her research is in the poetics of Modernism and Postmodernism in Russian and Slavic literatures, in the context of European phenomenology and psychoanalytic theory. She is a co-author of Russian Postmodernism: New Perspectives on Post-Soviet Culture (1999 and 2016) with Mikhail Epstein and Alexander Genis. She is on the executive boards of the Australasian Association for Communist and Post-communist Studies (AACPCS) and the North American Serbian Studies Society (NASSS) and is regional representative for Australia of the International Dostoevsky Society (IDS). She is chief editor of The Dostoevsky Journal: A Comparative Literature Review.

Previous

Title: Dostoevsky and the Realists