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The Great Irish Famine and Social Class

Conflicts, Responsibilities, Representations

by Marguerite Corporaal (Volume editor) Peter Gray (Volume editor)
Edited Collection XIV, 322 Pages
Series: Reimagining Ireland, Volume 89

Summary

The sesquicentenary of the Great Irish Famine saw the emergence of seminal, often revisionist, scholarship addressing the impact of the catastrophe on Ireland’s economy (including its relations with Britain) and investigating topics such as the suffering of the rural classes, landlord and tenant relations, Poor Laws and relief operations. The Great Irish Famine and Social Class represents a significant new stage in Irish Famine scholarship, adopting a broader interdisciplinary approach that includes ground-breaking demographical, economic, cultural and literary research on poverty, poor relief and class relations during one of Europe’s most devastating food crises. The volume incorporates a comparative European framework, as well as exploring the issue of class in relation to the British and North American Famine diaspora.

Table Of Content

  • Cover
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • About the authors
  • About the book
  • This eBook can be cited
  • Contents
  • List of Illustrations
  • List of Tables
  • Acknowledgements
  • Introduction (Marguérite Corporaal / Peter Gray)
  • Part I Experiences and Representations of Poverty
  • How the Other Three-Quarters Lived: The Cabin in Famine Literature (Melissa Fegan)
  • ‘[W]orse than the Great Polish and Russian Proprietors’: Landlord-Tenant Relations in Ireland and Partitioned Poland in the Pre-Famine Period (Paweł Hamera)
  • Part II The Famine and Class Relations
  • ‘A Vast Waste of Pauperism’: An Examination of Irish Famine Eviction (Ciarán Reilly)
  • Organizational Narrative and Memory in Social Context: Representations of the Great Irish Famine in Official Publications of Irish Joint-Stock Banks (Declan Curran)
  • William Sharman Crawford, the Famine and County Down (Peter Gray)
  • Transformative Nationalism and Class Relations in Irish Famine Fiction, 1896–1909 (Christopher Cusack)
  • Part III Poor Laws and Relief
  • ‘Paupers and Beggars Brats’: Governance and Mortality in the Parsonstown Workhouse during the Great Famine (Andrés Eiríksson)
  • Workhouses as Heterotopic Spaces in Early Famine Fiction (Marguérite Corporaal)
  • ‘Bad As It Is, We Were Better Off in England’: Locating the Famine Irish Experience in Britain through Deposition Testimony (Lewis Darwen / Brian Gurrin)
  • Part IV The Famine, Class and Emigration
  • ‘The Atrocious Avarice of the Irish Landlords’: Canadian Public Sentiment and the Irish Famine Migration of 1847 (Jason King)
  • The Famine Irish, the Catholic Church, and the Cultural Dynamics of the American Middle Class (Peter D. O’Neill)
  • Notes on Contributors
  • Bibliography
  • Index
  • Series index

Marguérite Corporaal and Peter Gray

The Great Irish Famine
and Social Class

Conflicts, Responsibilities, Representations

image

PETER LANG

Oxford • Bern • Berlin • Bruxelles • New York • Wien

About the authors

Marguérite Corporaal is Associate Professor of British Literature at Radboud University Nijmegen. She is the author of Relocated Memories of the Great Famine in Irish and Diaspora Fiction, 1847–1870 (2017) and co-editor of Irish Studies and the Dynamics of Memory (2017), Global Legacies of the Great Irish Famine: Transnational and Interdisciplinary Perspectives (2014), Recollecting Hunger: An Anthology (2012) and Traveling Irishness in the Long Nineteenth Century (2017).

Peter Gray is Professor of Modern Irish History and Director of the Institute of Irish Studies at Queen’s University Belfast. He is the author of The Irish Famine (1995), Famine, Land and Politics (1999) and The Making of the Irish Poor Law, 1815–43 (2009). He is co-editor of The Irish Lord Lieutenancy, c.1541–1922 (2012), Poverty and Welfare in Ireland, 1838–1948 (2011), Victoria’s Ireland? Irishness and Britishness, 1837–1901 (2004) and The Memory of Catastrophe (2004).

About the book

The sesquicentenary of the Great Irish Famine saw the emergence of seminal, often revisionist, scholarship addressing the impact of the catastrophe on Ireland’s economy (including its relations with Britain) and investigating topics such as the suffering of the rural classes, landlord and tenant relations, Poor Laws and relief operations. The Great Irish Famine and Social Class represents a significant new stage in Irish Famine scholarship, adopting a broader interdisciplinary approach that includes ground-breaking demographical, economic, cultural and literary research on poverty, poor relief and class relations during one of Europe’s most devastating food crises. The volume incorporates a comparative European framework, as well as exploring the issue of class in relation to the British and North American Famine diaspora.

This eBook can be cited

This edition of the eBook can be cited. To enable this we have marked the start and end of a page. In cases where a word straddles a page break, the marker is placed inside the word at exactly the same position as in the physical book. This means that occasionally a word might be bifurcated by this marker.

Contents

List of Illustrations

List of Tables

Acknowledgements

Marguérite Corporaal & Peter Gray

Introduction

Part I Experiences and Representations of Poverty

Melissa Fegan

How the Other Three-Quarters Lived: The Cabin in Famine Literature

Paweł Hamera

‘[W]orse than the Great Polish and Russian Proprietors’: Landlord-Tenant Relations in Ireland and Partitioned Poland in the Pre-Famine Period

Part II The Famine and Class Relations

Ciarán Reilly

‘A Vast Waste of Pauperism’: An Examination of Irish Famine Eviction←v | vi→

Declan Curran

Organizational Narrative and Memory in Social Context: Representations of the Great Irish Famine in Official Publications of Irish Joint-Stock Banks

Peter Gray

William Sharman Crawford, the Famine and County Down

Christopher Cusack

Transformative Nationalism and Class Relations in Irish Famine Fiction, 1896–1909

Part III Poor Laws and Relief

Andrés Eiríksson

‘Paupers and Beggars Brats’: Governance and Mortality in the Parsonstown Workhouse during the Great Famine

Marguérite Corporaal

Workhouses as Heterotopic Spaces in Early Famine Fiction

Lewis Darwen & Brian Gurrin

‘Bad As It Is, We Were Better Off in England’: Locating the Famine Irish Experience in Britain through Deposition Testimony

Part IV The Famine, Class and Emigration

Jason King

‘The Atrocious Avarice of the Irish Landlords’: Canadian Public Sentiment and the Irish Famine Migration of 1847←vi | vii→

Peter D. O’Neill

The Famine Irish, the Catholic Church, and the Cultural Dynamics of the American Middle Class

Notes on Contributors

Bibliography

Index←vii | viii→ ←viii | ix→

Acknowledgements

The present volume follows from collaboration between scholars within the International Network of Irish Famine Studies, which was funded by the Dutch research council NWO between 2014 and 2017 (236–69-007), and which we co-directed with colleagues from Maynooth University, Ireland, and University of Helsinki, Finland.

First versions of some of the articles included in this volume were presented at the conference The Great Irish Famine and Social Class, hosted by Queen’s University Belfast in April 2017. We are grateful for the generous financial support from NWO and Queen’s University Belfast, which made this event possible.

Marguérite Corporaal & Peter Gray

Details

Pages
XIV, 322
ISBN (PDF)
9781788741972
ISBN (ePUB)
9781788741989
ISBN (MOBI)
9781788741996
ISBN (Softcover)
9781788741668
Language
English
Publication date
2019 (February)
Tags
The Great Irish Famine Class Relations Poverty and Relief
Published
Oxford, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, New York, Wien, 2019. XIV, 322 pp., 9 fig. b/w, 4 tables

Biographical notes

Marguerite Corporaal (Volume editor) Peter Gray (Volume editor)

Marguérite Corporaal is Associate Professor of British Literature at Radboud University Nijmegen. She is the author of Relocated Memories of the Great Famine in Irish and Diaspora Fiction, 1847–1870 (2017) and co-editor of Irish Studies and the Dynamics of Memory (2017), Global Legacies of the Great Irish Famine: Transnational and Interdisciplinary Perspectives (2014), Recollecting Hunger: An Anthology (2012) and Traveling Irishness in the Long Nineteenth Century (2017). Peter Gray is Professor of Modern Irish History and Director of the Institute of Irish Studies at Queen’s University Belfast. He is the author of The Irish Famine (1995), Famine, Land and Politics (1999) and The Making of the Irish Poor Law, 1815–43 (2009). He is co-editor of The Irish Lord Lieutenancy, c.1541–1922 (2012), Poverty and Welfare in Ireland, 1838–1948 (2011), Victoria’s Ireland? Irishness and Britishness, 1837–1901 (2004) and The Memory of Catastrophe (2004).

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