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Opening and Extending Vocational Education

by Philipp Eigenmann (Volume editor) Philipp Gonon (Volume editor) Markus Weil (Volume editor)
Edited Collection 396 Pages

Table Of Content

  • Cover
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • About the author
  • About the book
  • This eBook can be cited
  • Contents
  • Opening and Extending Vocational Education – An Introduction: (Philipp Eigenmann, Philipp Gonon and Markus Weil)
  • A. Historical Perspectives on Extending Vocational Education
  • Australian Technical and Vocational Education and Training: A Path Well-Travelled: (John Pardy)
  • Theoretical Frameworks and Historical Experiences of Industrialisation for an Exchange with Developing Countries for the Further Development of Qualification for Employment: (Stefan Wolf)
  • The Origin of Vocational Guidance in Switzerland: Between Promotion of Aptitudes and Social Reproduction: (Lorenzo Bonoli)
  • Historical-Cultural Dimension of VET in Ukraine: (Oksana Melnyk)
  • B. Opening Vocational Education Structures
  • ‘How I Have Grown Over These Years Seems to Be Extreme to Me’. Socialisation of the Next Generation in an Innovative Learning Culture: (Antje Barabasch, Anna Keller and Dominic Caldart)
  • Vocational Orientation at German Universities – Reality, Desire or Contradiction?: (Martin Fischer)
  • The Challenges of Combining Scientific and Vocational Education. The Case of a New Tertiary Dual-Study Degree in Switzerland: (Philipp Eigenmann)
  • Leadership Education for Undergraduate Students: Strengthening Career Readiness at U.S. Universities: (K. Peter Kuchinke and Alexandre Ardichvili)
  • C. Opening and Extending of Formal Vocational Education
  • Can ‘Occupation’ Disrupt the Logic of Qualification Frameworks?: (Jeanne Gamble)
  • Training to be Entrepreneurial: Examining Vocational Education Programmes for Young Women in Industrial Training Institutes (ITI) in Kolkata: (Saikat Maitra and Srabani Maitra)
  • Apprenticeships for Adulthood: The Contribution of the Third Sector to Non-Formal Vocational Education: (Fernando Marhuenda Fluixá)
  • Meeting Rising Skill Demands: Higher Vocational Training in Switzerland as an Example of Tertiary Vocational Training: (Gina Di Maio)
  • Continuing Higher Education Between Academic and Professional Skills: (Philipp Gonon and Markus Weil)
  • D. Epilogue
  • Culture and VET – An Outdated Connection?: (Anja Heikkinen)
  • List of Authors
  • List of Figures
  • List of Tables
  • Series index

cover

About the author

PHILIP EIGENMANN is the head of research at the Thurgau University of Teacher Education (Switzerland) and senior teaching and research assistant at the Institute of Education, University of Zurich. His research interests are vocational education and higher education, history of education and (vocational) education and migration.

PHILIP GONON is a professor of vocational education and training at the Institute of Education, Zurich University, where he teaches vocational pedagogy, history and theory of vocational and continuing education. His research also includes quality and education, education policy and digitalization.

MARKUS WEIL is the Head of the Center for Organisational Continuing Education and Counselling at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland. He also works as a lecturer in the field of University Teaching and Learning with a special interest to teaching in English, internationalisation, role taking and peer learning processes.

About the book

Philipp Eigenmann, Philipp Gonon & Markus Weil (Eds.)

Opening and Extending Vocational Education

Vocational education has been opened up and extends to various directions: Higher education tends to take on vocational education models. Vice versa, vocational education development partially follows the structures of higher education. In addition, informal learning and recognition of competences widen the perspectives on vocational education.

This book highlights a variety of developments and analyses from countries like Australia, Germany, Spain, Switzerland, South Africa, India, Ukraine and the United States, but also from a more global perspective. It reveals that regardless of national pathways a new shape of vocational education and educational provision with a specific focus on vocations, workplace and learning is emerging.

This eBook can be cited

This edition of the eBook can be cited. To enable this we have marked the start and end of a page. In cases where a word straddles a page break, the marker is placed inside the word at exactly the same position as in the physical book. This means that occasionally a word might be bifurcated by this marker.

Contents

Philipp Eigenmann, Philipp Gonon and Markus Weil

Opening and Extending Vocational Education – An Introduction

A.Historical Perspectives on Extending
Vocational Education

John Pardy

Australian Technical and Vocational Education and Training: A Path Well-Travelled

Stefan Wolf

Theoretical Frameworks and Historical Experiences of Industrialisation for an Exchange with Developing Countries for the Further Development of Qualification for Employment

Lorenzo Bonoli

The Origin of Vocational Guidance in Switzerland: Between Promotion of Aptitudes and Social Reproduction

Oksana Melnyk

Historical-Cultural Dimension of VET in Ukraine

B.Opening Vocational Education Structures

Antje Barabasch, Anna Keller and Dominic Caldart

‘How I Have Grown Over These Years Seems to Be Extreme to Me’. Socialisation of the Next Generation in an Innovative Learning Culture

Martin Fischer

Vocational Orientation at German Universities – Reality, Desire or Contradiction?

Philipp Eigenmann

The Challenges of Combining Scientific and Vocational Education. The Case of a New Tertiary Dual-Study Degree in Switzerland

K. Peter Kuchinke and Alexandre Ardichvili

Leadership Education for Undergraduate Students: Strengthening Career Readiness at U.S. Universities

C.Opening and Extending of Formal Vocational Education

Jeanne Gamble

Can ‘Occupation’ Disrupt the Logic of Qualification Frameworks?

Saikat Maitra and Srabani Maitra

Training to be Entrepreneurial: Examining Vocational Education Programmes for Young Women in Industrial Training Institutes (ITI) in Kolkata

Fernando Marhuenda Fluixá

Apprenticeships for Adulthood: The Contribution of the Third Sector to Non-Formal Vocational Education

Gina Di Maio

Meeting Rising Skill Demands: Higher Vocational Training in Switzerland as an Example of Tertiary Vocational Training

Philipp Gonon and Markus Weil

Continuing Higher Education Between Academic and Professional Skills

D.Epilogue

Anja Heikkinen

Culture and VET – An Outdated Connection?

List of Authors

List of Figures

List of Tables

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philipp eigenmann, philipp gonon and markus weil

Opening and Extending Vocational Education – An Introduction

Vocational education has always been subject to change due to its relation to several varying rationales, like education, economy or vocation. Vocational education cannot be reduced to skill formation, but rather it combines economic as well as educational and social functions in society. These somehow contradictory functions have to be permanently adapted and renegotiated. In this context, vocational education has been opened up and extended in various directions over time. Vocational education, in a broad sense, embraces apprenticeships and initial vocational education schemes, as well as further education and professional training settings. The different rationales and learning sites in enterprises, schools or educational providers could be addressed by the topic opening and extending vocational education. This means taking a broader view of contexts and histories by addressing transdisciplinary and intercultural aspects or by using multiperspective approaches.

In terms of opening and extending vocational education, different relations become apparent:

Firstly, higher education adopts vocational education models. Though primarily academic, higher education programmes of study increasingly include aspects of workplace learning. In this regard, higher education institutions collaborate with companies in order to meet their skill demands.

Secondly (and vice versa), vocational education development tends to adapt to structures of higher education. Rising skill demands in the labour market do not necessarily result in rising shares of higher education. Vocational education itself responds to this challenge by including academic approaches and adopting the logic of higher education.

Thirdly, privatization and marketization have emerged as well as utilitarian approaches to labour-market skills. As vocational education is ←9 | 10→opened and extended, new (and probably private) stakeholders become involved and foster competition between different types of vocational education. This may lead to diversification of vocational education programmes tailored to the needs of companies or subsectors. However, state regulation of vocational education would become more complex.

Fourthly, informal learning and recognition of particular competences have widened perspectives on vocational education. International mobility and labour migration increasingly challenge national regulations of vocational diplomas and certificates. Furthermore, vocational learning also takes place outside formal education settings.

In this volume, we collect historical perspectives on these phenomena, structural approaches, as well as aspects of formalization and informal learning. The articles are clustered in three different sections, while acknowledging that these perspectives are overlapping and cannot be separated. The sections present different lenses through which the authors examine vocational education and its extending tendencies.1

This volume draws on a workshop held by the “VET & Culture Network”. In September 2018, the topic of opening and extending vocational education was tackled at this workshop in Zurich, combining site visits and paper presentations. The VET & Culture Network is a voluntary network that practises cross-cultural, independent and critical research into transformations in vocational education and relations between work, education and politics. The aim of the network is to support members in their different academic and institutional environments, through virtual communication, annual meetings, collaborative teaching, supervision and publishing.

In an epilogue in section D, Anja Heikkinen presents an article entitled “Culture and VET – an outdated connection?”, which historicizes and contextualizes the network and also the Zurich conference activities. Heikkinen asks why the challenges of environmental degradation, social and economic inequalities and forced migration remain marginal in the agenda of vocational education research. The chapter makes the case for recovering the connection between culture and vocational education and refers to the urgency of research into vocational education as a cultural phenomenon in the current era of the Anthropocene or the Capitalocene.

←10 | 11→

A Historical Perspectives on Extending Vocational Education

The development of vocational education itself can be regarded as an extension and an opening of formerly closed worlds. The term “Vocational Education and Training” (VET), which is nowadays globally common, but differently used, reflects the interplay of schools and workplace or of education and training in the context of educational systems, vocations and the economy.

In the 19th century, training in workshops and the rising industry was the business of corporations or firms themselves. At the same time, the task of primary schools was seen as being delivery of elementary cultural techniques, enabling young people to participate in society. Such education was not expected to prepare students for the world of work. However, the first manual courses (in Baden, Wuerttemberg, Bavaria, Saxony, Prussia and, later, in Nordic countries and Switzerland) were premised on usefulness in subsequent working life. Thus, male pupils acquired skills in handicrafts, modelling, simple handles and treatments for wood and metal, while girls learnt cooking, knitting, sewing and tailoring. The basic knowledge taught in elementary schools gets lost after a while, and continuation schools had to repeat and deepen already learnt lessons. Nevertheless, the critique that primary and continuation schools did not really prepare for life led educational reformers to make the school system more relevant for work. In Germany, Georg Kerschensteiner complained about an almost “complete absence of any adequate provision for the continued training of boys and girls between the ages of 14 and 18 – for that part of the population which earns its daily bread through the practical work of commerce, handwork, industry or agriculture” (Kerschensteiner, 1914, p. V).

Thus, in most countries at the beginning of the 20th century, there was a debate in favour of establishing a vocational education system. Besides training in firms, “Bildung” and education also had to be oriented towards agricultural, business, commercial, industry and trade needs. In line with this, pleas were also made for more “realistic” subjects like mathematics and natural science in secondary schools and, ←11 | 12→more specifically, technical education, in order for the education system to be competitive at an international level. At the same time, an economic policy was implemented which also led to greater engagement on the part of the state in terms of boosting VET. Building up VET programmes supported by the state was also a measure intended to strengthen small and medium-sized enterprises, enabling them to survive in a market which had opened its doors to industry and the importing of industrial goods from other countries.

Summary

Vocational education has been opened up and extends to various directions: Higher education tends to take on vocational education models. Vice versa, vocational education development partially follows the structures of higher education. In addition, informal learning and recognition of competences widen the perspectives on vocational education. This book highlights a variety of developments and analyses from countries like Australia, Germany, Spain, Switzerland, South Africa, India, Ukraine and the United States, but also from a more global perspective. It reveals that regardless of national pathways a new shape of vocational education and educational provision with a specific focus on vocations, workplace and learning is emerging.

Details

Pages
396
ISBN (PDF)
9783034336062
ISBN (ePUB)
9783034336079
ISBN (MOBI)
9783034336086
ISBN (Book)
9783034334877
Language
English
Publication date
2021 (January)
Published
Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, New York, Oxford, Warszawa, Wien, 2021. 396 pp., 1 fig. col., 8 fig. b/w, 2 tables.

Biographical notes

Philipp Eigenmann (Volume editor) Philipp Gonon (Volume editor) Markus Weil (Volume editor)

Philipp Eigenmann is the head of research at the Thurgau University of Teacher Education(Switzerland) and senior teaching and research assistant at the Institute of Education, University of Zurich. His research interests are vocational education and higher education, history of education and (vocational) education and migration. Philipp Gonon is a professor of vocational education and training at the Institute of Education, Zurich University, where he teaches vocational pedagogy, history and theory of vocational and continuing education. His research also includes quality and education, education policy and digitalization. Markus Weil is the Head of the Center for Organisational Continuing Education and Counselling at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland. He also works as a lecturer in the field of University Teaching and Learning with a special interest to teaching in English, internationalisation, role taking and peer learning processes.

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Title: Opening and Extending Vocational Education