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Readings in Italian Mannerism II

Architecture

by Liana De Girolami Cheney (Volume editor)
Monographs XXIV, 236 Pages
Series: American University Studies , Volume 41

Summary

This collection celebrates the 450th year anniversary of the publication of Giorgio Vasari’s Vite (The Lives of the Most Excellent Painters, Sculptors and Architects [Florence: Giunti, 1568]), in which, in the prolegomenon, architects were highly praised along with the principles and technology of architecture. To honor this significant event, the selected articles in this book contain some published excerpts, some revised and expanded, some never published. These articles demonstrate the extraordinary influence of the classical tradition in Renaissance and Mannerist architecture and its role in the education of architectural students. In particular, these essays discuss the materials employed and their functions as well as the architect’s role in society. These articles also address the impact of Mannerist architecture and art theory in sixteenth-century European architecture and culture.

Table Of Content

  • Cover
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • About the author(s)/editor(s)
  • About the book
  • This eBook can be cited
  • Contents
  • List of Illustrations
  • Acknowledgments
  • Preface
  • Introduction (Liana De Girolami Cheney)
  • Part I. Essential Studies on the Topic
  • A. The Education of the Architect (Vitruvius)
  • B. The Fundamental Principles of Architecture (Vitruvius)
  • C. The Architecture …, Book 9, Chapters 9–11 (Leon Battista Alberti)
  • D. The Entire Works on Architecture and Perspective (Sebastiano Serlio)
  • E. To the Artists in Design (Giorgio Vasari)
  • F. Michelangelo and the Porta Pia (Elisabeth B. MacDougall)
  • G. The Architecture of Mannerism (Sir Nikolaus Pevsner)
  • Part II. Reflections by Contemporary Scholars
  • A. Giulio Romano: Mannerist Architect and Draftsman (Deborah H. Cibelli)
  • B. Message, Montage, Mannerism: Varieties of Extraordinary in Serlio’s Extraordinary Book (Charles Burroughs)
  • C. Il Corridoio Vasariano: A Resplendent Passage to Medici and Vasari’s Grandeur (Liana De Girolami Cheney)
  • D. Giorgio Vasari and Mannerist Architecture: A Marriage of Beauty and Function in Urban Spaces (Liana De Girolami Cheney)
  • E. Architectural Mannerism and the Polish-Lithuanian Reformation (Andrzej Piotrowski)
  • Contributors
  • Index

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ILLUSTRATIONS

Figure I.1. Cosimo Bartoli’s annotated copy of Giovanni Giocondo’s edition of Vitruvius, De Architectura, issued by the Giunta Press in Florence, 1513. The edition is called “La Gioconda seconda” because first published in Venice by Giovanni da Tridino, known as Tacuino, in 1511. Photo credit: Courtesy of Dr. Umberto Pregliasco and Dr. Giovanni Mazzaferro, Letteratura Artistica http://letteraturaartistica.blogspot.com/2017/09/cosimo-bartoli.html.

Figure I.2. Leon Battista Alberti, De re aedificatoria. Florence: Lorenzo Torrentino, 1550. Photo credit: Public domain.wikipedia.org.

Figure I.3. Sebastiano Serlio, Endpiece to Book I–II, from Compendium of Architectural Books I–V (Paris: Jean Barbé, 1545). Photo credit: Courtesy of Metropolitan Museum of Art donated to Wikimedia Commons. Line credit: Harris Beisbane Dick Fund, 1937 (Accession Number 37.56.2. 1–5).

Figure I.4. Michelangelo’s Porta Pia, 1561–1564, Rome. Photo credit: Public domain. wikipedia.org. ← ix | x →

Figure I.5. Giorgio Vasari, Title Page, Vite … The Lives of the most excellent painters, sculptors and architects (Florence: Giunti, 1568). Photo credit: Public domain. wikipedia.org.

Figure I.6. Cornelis Floris (II), Grotesque. Engraved by Johannes of Lucas van Doetchum and printed by Hieronymus Cock in 1556. Photo credit: Courtesy of the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam.

Figure A.1. Attributed to Giulio Romano, Four Architectural Studies. Pen and brown ink with wash over charcoal on paper. Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia. Extended loan from Giuliano Ceseri. GMOA 1995.285E. Photo credit: Courtesy of Giuliano Ceseri and the Georgia Museum of Art.

Figure B.1. Portal with “two seats” and random components. Rusticated portal no. 18. Sebastiano Serlio, Libro extraordinario (Lyon: Jean de Tournes, 1551). Photo credit: Courtesy the Avery Library, Columbia University, NY.

Figure B.2. Entrance portal into the court of the palace of Cardinal d’Este at Fontainebleau (le Grand Ferrare). Rusticated portal no. 1. Sebastiano Serlio, Libro extraordinario (Lyon: Jean de Tournes, 1551). Photo credit: Courtesy the Avery Library, Columbia University, NY.

Figure B.3. The “bestial” order. Rusticated portal no. 29. Sebastiano Serlio, Libro extraordinario (Lyon: Jean de Tournes, 1551). Photo credit: Courtesy the Avery Library, Columbia University, NY.

Figure B.4. Arch of Bourg Neuf, in Maurice Scève (text), Entry of Henri II into Lyon, 1548. Published by Guillaume Rouille (Lyon: Jean de Tournes, 1549, Italian version). Photo credit: Courtesy The Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, University of Virginia, Gordon 1549.M3. Online edition, Image no. 53 file://localhost/. http/::search.lib.virginia.edu:catalog:uva-lib/1038387.

Figure B.5. Woodwoses (Wild Men) as support figures in armorial bearings. Colegio de San Gregorio, Valladolid. Façade with wild men flanking the portal. Colegio San Gregorio, ← x | xi → Valladolid. Photo credit: Photograph by Zarateman CC BY-SA 3.0 https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=16757342.

Figure B.6. Portal with mask and tablet. Rusticated portal no. 12. Sebastiano Serlio, Libro extraordinario (Lyon: Jean de Tournes, 1551). Photo credit: Courtesy the Avery Library, Columbia University, NY.

Figure C.1. Giorgio Vasari, Galleria degli Uffizi. Exterior. View toward the Arno. 1565, Florence. Photo credit: Courtesy of Art Resource, NY.

Figure C.2. Giorgio Vasari, Galleria degli Uffizi and Corridor. Exterior. View from across the Arno River, 1565, Florence. Photo credit: Courtesy of Art Resource, NY.

Figure C.3. Giorgio Vasari, Corridor. Exterior. View toward the Ponte Vecchio, 1565, Florence. Photo credit: Public domain. Courtesy of commons.wikipedia.org..

Figure C.4. Giorgio Vasari, Corridor. Exterior. View from the Boboli Gardens and Pitti Palace, 1565, Florence. Photo credit: Public domain. Courtesy of wikipedia.org.

Figure C.5. Il Passetto di Borgo, 1277–1527. Exterior. Vatican corridor, Rome. Photo credit: Public domain. Courtesy of commons.wikipedia.org.

Figure C.6. Cheney’s Tau cross design. Aerial view of the Corridoio Vasariano and Piazza Signoria, Florence. Photo credit: Courtesy of author.

Figure C.7. Giorgio Vasari, Self-Portraits Gallery, det. Interior. Corridoio Vasariano, 1564–74, Florence. Photo credit: Courtesy of Art Resource, NY.

Figure D.1. Giorgio Vasari, Self-Portrait, 1570. Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence. Photo credit: Public domain. Courtesy of commons.wikimedia.org.

Figure D.2. Giorgio Vasari, Endpiece of the Fine Arts from the Vite … 1550, Florence. Photo credit: Public domain. Courtesy of commons.wikimedia.org.

Figure D.3. Giorgio Vasari, Loggia del Pesce, 1568, Florence. Original location. Photo credit: Public domain. Courtesy of Hiddenflorence.org. and Harvard College Library, Cambridge, MA. ← xi | xii →

Figure D.4. Giorgio Vasari, Loggia del Pesce, 1568. Present location, Piazza dei Ciompi, Florence. Photo credit: Public domain. Courtesy of commons.wikimedia.org.

Figure D.5. Giorgio Vasari, Colonnade view, det. Loggia del Pesce, 1568, Florence. Photo credit: Public domain. Courtesy of commons.wikimedia.org.

Figure D.6. Giorgio Vasari, Dedicatory plaque, det. Loggia del Pesce, 1568, Florence. Photo credit: Public domain. Courtesy of commons.wikimedia.org.

Figure D.7. Giorgio Vasari, Medallion with Fish, det. Loggia del Pesce, 1568, Florence. Photo credit: Public domain. Courtesy of commons.wikimedia.org.

Figure D.8. Giorgio Vasari, Grascia coat-of-arms, det. Loggia del Pesce, 1568, Florence. Photo credit: Public domain. Courtesy of commons.wikimedia.org.

Figure D.9. Giorgio Vasari, Medici-Toledo coat-of-arms, det. Loggia del Pesce, 1568, Florence. Photo credit: Public domain. Courtesy of commons.wikimedia.org.

Figure D.10. Giorgio Vasari, Loggia of Castiglion Fiorentino, 1570, Tuscany. Photo credit: Public domain. Courtesy of commons.wikimedia.org.

Figure D.11. Giorgio Vasari, Logge Vasariane, 1575, Arezzo. Photo credit: Public domain. Courtesy of commons.wikimedia.org.

Figures E.1a
and E.1b.
Cornelis Floris (II), Grotesque, and its detail. Engraved by Johannes of Lucas van Doetchum and printed by Hieronymus Cock in 1556. Photo credit: Courtesy of the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam.

Figure E.2a. The Boim Chapel in Lviv, Ukraine. Photo credit: Courtesy of the author.

Figure E.2b. The Boim Chapel, compositional diagram. Photo credit: Courtesy of the author.

Figure E.3a. The Przybyłowie Residence in Kazimierz Dolny nad Wisłą, Poland. Photo credit: Courtesy of the author.

Figure E.3b. The Przybyłowie Residence, compositional diagram. Photo credit: Courtesy of the author.

Figure E.3c. The Przybyłowie Residence, det. Photo credit: Courtesy of the author. ← xii | xiii →

Figure E.3d. The Przybyłowie Residence, det. Photo credit: Courtesy of the author.

Figure E.4a. Celej Residence in Kazimierz Dolny nad Wisłą, Poland. Photo credit: Courtesy of the author.

Figures E.4b
and E.4c.
The Celej Residence, det. Photo credit: Courtesy of the author.

Figure E.4d. The Celej Residence, det. Photo credit: Courtesy of the author.

Figure E.5a. Windows in the Konopnica Residence in Lublin, Poland. Photo credit: Courtesy of the author.

Figures E.5b The Konopnica Residence, det. and its compositional and E.5c. diagram. Photo credit: Courtesy of the author.

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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The excerpts from original publications included as essays in this book were made possible thanks to the publishers’ permissions.

Details

Pages
XXIV, 236
ISBN (PDF)
9781433160776
ISBN (ePUB)
9781433160783
ISBN (MOBI)
9781433160790
ISBN (Hardcover)
9781433160721
Language
English
Publication date
2020 (March)
Published
New York, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, Oxford, Wien, 2020. XXIV, 236 pp., 46 b/w ill.

Biographical notes

Liana De Girolami Cheney (Volume editor)

Liana De Girolami Cheney, PhD is presently a Visiting Scholar in Art History at the Università di Aldo Moro in Bari, Italy, and Investigadora de Historia de Arte, SIELAE, Universidad de Coruña, Spain. She received her BS/BA in psychology and philosophy from the University of Miami, Florida, her MA in history of art and aesthetics from the University of Miami, Florida and her PhD in Italian Renaissance and Baroque from Boston University, Massachusetts. Dr. Cheney is Renaissance and Mannerist scholar, author, and coauthor of numerous articles and books, including: The Symbolism of 'Vanitas' in the Arts, Literature, and Music; Neoplatonic Aesthetics: Music, Literature and the Visual Arts; Giorgio Vasari’s Teachers: Sacred and Profane Love; Giuseppe Arcimboldo: The Magic Paintings; Self-Portraits by Women Painters; Giorgio Vasari’s Artistic and Emblematic Manifestations; Edward Burne-Jones’s Mythical Paintings; and Agnolo Bronzino: The Florentine Muse.

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