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Reframing Migration

Lampedusa, Border Spectacle and the Aesthetics of Subversion

by Federica Mazzara (Author)
©2019 Monographs XII, 260 Pages
Series: Italian Modernities, Volume 32

Summary

Over the past two decades, national and supranational institutions and the mass media have played a central role in presenting the migrant struggle in a sensational way, spreading an unjustified moral panic and relegating migrants themselves to spaces of invisibility.
Building on recent theoretical debates in migration studies around the so-called «autonomy of migration» - which sees people on the move as individuals with self-determination and agency - this book reframes migration in the Mediterranean, and specifically around the island of Lampedusa.
In particular, the book explores how activist and art forms have become a platform for subverting the dominant narrative of migration and generating a vital form of political dissent, by revealing the contradictions and paradoxes of the securitarian regime that regulates immigration into Europe.
The analysis focuses on works by, among others, Broomberg & Chanarin, Centre for Political Beauty, Forensic Architecture, Nikolaj Bendix Skyum Larsen, Isaac Julien, Tamara Kametani, Bouchra Khalili, Kalliopi Lemos, Zakaria Mohamed Ali, Maya Ramsay, Giacomo Sferlazzo, Aida Silvestri, Ai Weiwei, Lucy Woodand Dagmawi Yimer.

Table Of Contents

  • Cover
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • About the author
  • About the book
  • This eBook can be cited
  • Contents
  • List of Figures
  • Acknowledgements
  • Introduction
  • Chapter 1: Mapping Lampedusa: Spaces of (In)visibility in the Borderscape of Europe
  • Chapter 2: From Bare Lives to Subjects of Power: A Counter-Map of Resistance
  • Chapter 3: Border Aesthetics and Aesthetics of Subversion: Counter-Narratives in Migratory Contexts
  • Chapter 4: Death and Memory after the Journey: Counter-Commemoration in Art
  • Afterword
  • Bibliography
  • Index
  • Series index

Reframing Migration

Lampedusa, Border Spectacle and Aesthetics of Subversion

Federica Mazzara

Oxford • Bern • Berlin • Bruxelles • New York • Wien

About the author

Federica Mazzara is Senior Lecturer in Intercultural Communication at the University of Westminster. Her research interests lie in the interdisciplinary fields of migration studies and cultural studies. She has published widely on the literature of migration in Italy, theories of intermediality, and the visual arts as a form of political resistance. She has also curated art installations on migration, including Nothing is Missing by Mieke Bal, and is currently co-curating the exhibition Sink Without Trace (June-July 2019, P21 Gallery), which focuses on the issue of migrant deaths at sea.

About the book

"Reframing Migration interrogates the iconic status of Lampedusa as a centerpiece of the dominant European politics of migration and asylum. Examining a diverse array of artistic interventions into the asphyxiating discursive and scopic regime that frames the Mediterranean border spectacle of desperation and mass death, Federica Mazzara reveals a refreshing aesthetics of subversion."

— Nicholas De Genova, Professor and Chair,
Department of Comparative Cultural Studies, University of Houston

Over the past two decades, national and supranational institutions and the mass media have played a central role in presenting the migrant struggle in a sensational way, spreading an unjustified moral panic and relegating migrants themselves to spaces of invisibility.

Building on recent theoretical debates in migration studies around the so-called ‘autonomy of migration’ - which sees people on the move as individuals with self-determination and agency - this book reframes migration in the Mediterranean, and specifically around the island of Lampedusa.

In particular, the book explores how activist and art forms have become a platform for subverting the dominant narrative of migration and generating a vital form of political dissent, by revealing the contradictions and paradoxes of the securitarian regime that regulates immigration into Europe.

The analysis focuses on works by, among others, Broomberg & Chanarin, Centre for Political Beauty, Forensic Architecture, Nikolaj Bendix Skyum Larsen, Isaac Julien, Tamara Kametani, Bouchra Khalili, Kalliopi Lemos, Zakaria Mohamed Ali, Maya Ramsay, Giacomo Sferlazzo, Aida Silvestri, Ai Weiwei, Lucy Wood and Dagmawi Yimer.

This eBook can be cited

This edition of the eBook can be cited. To enable this we have marked the start and end of a page. In cases where a word straddles a page break, the marker is placed inside the word at exactly the same position as in the physical book. This means that occasionally a word might be bifurcated by this marker.

Figures

Figure 1. Gianni Cipriano, Hill of Shame (2011). Reproduced with permission from Gianni Cipriano.

Figure 2. Porto M entrance. Reproduced with permission.

Figure 3. Porto M. Shelves with pots and pans. Reproduced with permission.

Figure 4. Giacomo Sferlazzo, Nostra Signora delle coperte isotermiche (2016). Reproduced with permission from the artist.

Figure 5. Giacomo Sferlazzo, Madonna di Porto Salvo (2011). Reproduced with permission from the artist and the photographer (Laura Carnemolla).

Figure 6. Tamara Kametani, The Sea Stayed Calm for 180 Miles (2017). Reproduced with permission from the artist.

Figure 7. Tamara Kametani, Half a Mile from Lampedusa (2016). Reproduced with permission from the artist.

Figure 8. Kalliopi Lemos, At Crossroads (2009). Reproduced with permission from the artist.

Figure 9. Kalliopi Lemos, Pledges (2016). Reproduced with permission from the artist.←vii | viii→

Figure 10. Kalliopi Lemos, Pledges for a Safe Passage (2012). Reproduced with permission from the artist.

Figure 11. Aida Silvestri, ‘Awet’ (part of Even This Will Pass) (2013–2014). Reproduced with permission from the artist.

Figure 12. Lucy Wood, Medusa (part of Distant Neighbours/Vicini e Lontani) (2011). Reproduced with permission from the artist.

Figure 13. Lucy Wood, ‘Boat Fragments. TG1 Online, 14/03/2011’ (part of Distant Neighbours/Vicini e Lontani) (2011). Reproduced with permission from the artist.

Figure 14. Lucy Wood, ‘Boat Fragments. News Reporter’, 07/04/2011 (part of Distant Neighbours/Vicini e Lontani) (2011). Reproduced with permission from the artist.

Figure 15. Lucy Wood, ‘TO6411’ (part of Distant Neighbours/Vicini e Lontani) (2013). Reproduced with permission from the artist.

Figure 16. Maya Ramsay, ‘Young female, died 5–8-2015’ (part of Countless) (2016). Reproduced with permission from the artist.

Figure 17. Maya Ramsay, ‘No. 60. Graphite rubbing of unidentified migrant’s grave’ (part of Countless) (2016). Reproduced with permission from the artist.←viii | ix→

Figure 18. Maya Ramsay, ‘No. 60, unidentified migrant’s grave’ (part of Countless) (2016). Reproduced with permission from the artist.

Figure 19. Maya Ramsay, ‘N 46904, unidentified migrant’s grave’ (part of Countless) (2016). Reproduced with permission from the artist.

Figure 20. Broomberg & Chanarin, The Bureaucracy of Angels (2017). Commissioned by Art on the Underground. Reproduced with permission from the artists.

Figure 21. Broomberg & Chanarin, The Bureaucracy of Angels (2017). Installation at the King’s Cross St Pancras Station, London. Commissioned by Art on the Underground. Reproduced with permission from GG Archard.

Figure 22. Nikolaj Bendix Skyum Larsen, End of Dreams, detail (2015). Reproduced with permission from the artist.

Details

Pages
XII, 260
Year
2019
ISBN (PDF)
9781789972375
ISBN (ePUB)
9781789972382
ISBN (MOBI)
9781789972399
ISBN (Softcover)
9783034318846
DOI
10.3726/b15214
Language
English
Publication date
2019 (March)
Keywords
Aesthetics of Subversion Politics of Representation Lampedusa italy migration
Published
Oxford, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, New York, Wien, 2019. XII, 260 pp., 24 fig. b/w

Biographical notes

Federica Mazzara (Author)

Federica Mazzara is Senior Lecturer in Intercultural Communication at the University of Westminster. Her research interests lie in the interdisciplinary fields of migration studies and cultural studies. She has published widely on the literature of migration in Italy, theories of intermediality, and the visual arts as a form of political resistance. She has also curated art installations on migration, including Nothing is Missing by Mieke Bal, and is currently co-curating the exhibition Sink Without Trace (June-July 2019, P21 Gallery), which focuses on the issue of migrant deaths at sea.

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