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English and French Online Comments

A Text Linguistic Comparison of Popular Science Magazines

by John Marcus Sommer (Author)
Thesis 320 Pages

Table Of Content

  • Cover
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • About the author
  • About the book
  • This eBook can be cited
  • Table of Contents
  • 1. Introduction
  • 1.1 Knowledge Transfer via the World Wide Web
  • 1.2 Cultural Turn in Linguistics
  • 1.3 Research Question
  • 2. From Text to Text Linguistics
  • 3. Genre
  • 3.1 Genres as Analytical Categories
  • 3.2 The Multiple Layers of Genre
  • 3.3 Contrastive Textology
  • 3.4 Genre Change
  • 3.5 Intertextuality
  • 3.6 Genre and Culture
  • 4. Previous Research
  • 4.1 Letters to the Editor
  • 4.2 Readers’ Comments
  • 4.3 Facebook Comments
  • 4.4 Tweets
  • 4.5 Disqus & Livefyre
  • 5. Conversation Analysis
  • 5.1 Comparing Conversational Patterns
  • 5.2 Topic Changes
  • 5.3 Topic Continuation
  • 5.4 Conflictual vs. Non-Conflictual Conversations
  • 6. Corpus
  • 7. Diachronic Development of Letters to the Editor
  • 7.1 National Geographic
  • 7.2 Discover
  • 7.3 Sciences et Avenir
  • 7.4 GEO
  • 8. Diachronic Development of Online Comments
  • 8.1 National Geographic
  • 8.2 Discover
  • 8.3 Sciences et Avenir
  • 8.4 GEO
  • 9. Multiple Commenters
  • 9.1 Commenters in Multiple Threads
  • 9.2 Commenters on More Than One Platform
  • 9.3 Long-Term Commenters
  • 10. Layout Comparison
  • 11. Situation
  • 12. Topic Management
  • 12.1 Examples of Topic Maintenance
  • 12.2 Examples of Topic Change
  • 12.3 Topic Changes within Conversations
  • 12.4 Interim Summary: Topic Maintenance and Topic Changes
  • 12.5 Quantitative Analysis of Topical Actions
  • 13. Qualitative Analysis
  • 13.1 Conflict Conversations
  • 13.2 Complete Support Conversations
  • 13.3 Sharing with Friends
  • 13.4 The Use of Links
  • 13.5 The Use of Emoticons
  • 13.6 Hashtags
  • 13.7 Quote Article
  • 14. Quantitative Analysis
  • 14.1 Language Comparison
  • 14.2 Platform Comparison
  • 14.3 Comparison of Overall Magazine Websites
  • 14.4 Discussion of Results
  • 15. Conclusion
  • Appendix
  • List of Figures
  • List of Tables
  • References
  • Corpus
  • Series Page

cover

Bibliographic Information published by the Deutsche
Nationalbibliothek

The Deutsche Nationalbibliothek lists this publication in the Deutsche
Nationalbibliografie; detailed bibliographic data is available in the
internet at
http://dnb.d-nb.de.

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
A CIP catalog record for this book has been applied for at the
Library of Congress.

About the author

John Marcus Sommer studied English Language and Literature and Romance Studies at Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg. He worked as a doctoral researcher at Martin Luther University, Department of Linguistics. His research interests lie in texts, conversations, literature, arts, films, and games.

About the book

In recent years, text and media linguistics have focused on genres in the new media. This is almost always accompanied by the question of the establishment and development of such content. Due to the diversity of genres and their dynamic development one can speak of an almost inexhaustible field of research. The book is located in this field of research. Its goal is to examine the origin and nature of readers’ comments by readers of French and English popular science magazines. Media content is dissected by using text linguistic tools. Transmedial cultures are explored across time, platforms, languages, and editing houses.

This eBook can be cited

This edition of the eBook can be cited. To enable this we have marked the start and end of a page. In cases where a word straddles a page break, the marker is placed inside the word at exactly the same position as in the physical book. This means that occasionally a word might be bifurcated by this marker.

Table of Contents

1. Introduction

1.1 Knowledge Transfer via the World Wide Web

1.2 Cultural Turn in Linguistics

1.3 Research Question

2. From Text to Text Linguistics

3. Genre

3.1 Genres as Analytical Categories

3.2 The Multiple Layers of Genre

3.3 Contrastive Textology

3.4 Genre Change

3.5 Intertextuality

3.6 Genre and Culture

4. Previous Research

4.1 Letters to the Editor

4.2 Readers’ Comments

4.3 Facebook Comments

4.4 Tweets

4.5 Disqus & Livefyre

5. Conversation Analysis

5.1 Comparing Conversational Patterns

5.2 Topic Changes

5.3 Topic Continuation

5.4 Conflictual vs. Non-Conflictual Conversations

6. Corpus

7. Diachronic Development of Letters to the Editor

7.1 National Geographic

7.2 Discover

7.3 Sciences et Avenir

7.4 GEO

8. Diachronic Development of Online Comments

8.1 National Geographic

8.2 Discover

8.3 Sciences et Avenir

8.4 GEO

9. Multiple Commenters

9.1 Commenters in Multiple Threads

9.2 Commenters on More Than One Platform

9.3 Long-Term Commenters

10. Layout Comparison

11. Situation

12. Topic Management

12.1 Examples of Topic Maintenance

12.2 Examples of Topic Change

12.3 Topic Changes within Conversations

12.4 Interim Summary: Topic Maintenance and Topic Changes

12.5 Quantitative Analysis of Topical Actions

13. Qualitative Analysis

13.1 Conflict Conversations

13.2 Complete Support Conversations

13.3 Sharing with Friends

13.4 The Use of Links

13.5 The Use of Emoticons

13.6 Hashtags

13.7 Quote Article

14. Quantitative Analysis

14.1 Language Comparison

14.2 Platform Comparison

14.3 Comparison of Overall Magazine Websites

14.4 Discussion of Results

15. Conclusion

Appendix

List of Figures

List of Tables

References

Corpus

←16 | 11→

1. Introduction

1.1 Knowledge Transfer via the World Wide Web

Popular Science has a long tradition of knowledge transfer, from museum exhibitions to radio and TV-shows and also print magazines. The Internet-era brought along new possibilities. In the case of popular science magazines, websites were introduced. However, there have been some recent changes concerning knowledge transfer online. Museums share videos on YouTube, researchers share their knowledge on Twitter, and universities offer online courses. These are developments that lead to new representational forms of knowledge. Big international publishers are interested in attracting the audience to their products.

Successful magazines also make use of new technologies such as commenting functions, which are known from other contexts. The engagement of readers in online interactions seems to be an essential feature for successful popular science magazines. Commenting systems help to create forums for the topics in the magazines’ articles and to make them accessible for laypeople. Additionally, popular science magazines are also interesting for current questions within the field of text linguistics since they contain a colorful mix of textual layers and genres, which also implies a heterogeneity that leads to processes of diversification and hybridization of texts (Held 2015: 297). My research interest lies within the genres letters to the editor and readers’ comments in the online and print versions of the popular science magazines National Geographic, Discover, Sciences et Avenir, and GEO. The aim of this book is to describe the changes within the genre profiles (Luginbühl 2014: 103–104) of the magazines and the differences or similarities between the journalistic cultures of the magazines. Due to the networked structure of the Internet, culture is best described as a “network of norms, assumptions, and beliefs of a community that are instantiated by certain forms of behavior and their related semiotic products” (Brock & Schildhauer 2017: 18).

Summary

In recent years, text and media linguistics have focused on genres in the new media. This is almost always accompanied by the question of the establishment and development of such content. Due to the diversity of genres and their dynamic development one can speak of an almost inexhaustible field of research. The book is located in this field of research. Its goal is to examine the origin and nature of readers’ comments by readers of French and English popular science magazines. Media content is dissected by using text linguistic tools. Transmedial cultures are explored across time, platforms, languages, and editing houses.

Details

Pages
320
ISBN (PDF)
9783631819760
ISBN (ePUB)
9783631819777
ISBN (MOBI)
9783631819784
ISBN (Book)
9783631801475
Language
English
Publication date
2020 (April)
Tags
Text linguistics Conversation Analysis Contrastive Textology Multifactorial Parallel Text Analysis Media Linguistics Politeness Impoliteness Genre Studies Social Media Facebook Twitter National Geographic Sciences et Avenir GEO Online Conflicts
Published
Berlin, Bern, Bruxelles, New York, Oxford, Warszawa, Wien, 2020. 320 pp., 154 fig. b/w, 12 tables.

Biographical notes

John Marcus Sommer (Author)

John Marcus Sommer studied English Language and Literature and Romance Studies at Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg. He worked as a doctoral researcher at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Linguistics. His research interests lie in texts, conversations, literature arts, films, and games.

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