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Canadian Political, Social and Historical (Re)visions in 20th and 21st Century

by Marcin Gabryś (Volume editor) Magdalena Marczuk-Karbownik (Volume editor) Magdalena Paluszkiewicz-Misiaczek (Volume editor)
Edited Collection 318 Pages

Summary

Canada trying to bring together Indigenous peoples, "two solitudes" of the French and the British, as well as a variety of poly-ethnic immigrants has mastered search for consensus and compromise as the best response to national, regional, political and ethnic tensions. This book examines how the evolution of various ideas, schemes, projects, proposals and objectives influenced the Canadian political and social present. It analyses how far Canada was able to realize its initial visions and to what extent it was forced to rework and reform them. It takes into account both the ideas which have actually been implemented and the ones which never progressed beyond the conceptual sphere, yet are important from historical perspective.

Table Of Content

  • Cover
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • About the author
  • About the book
  • This eBook can be cited
  • Contents
  • Canadian Political, Social and Historical (Re)Visions in the 20th and 21st Centuries?: (Marcin Gabryś, Magdalena Marczuk-Karbownik, Magdalena Paluszkiewicz-Misiaczek)
  • Canada on International Stage
  • Assessing Canada’s Liberal Internationalism: Where is Canada Headed on the Global Stage?: (David Carment, Richard Nimijean)
  • Feminism and Gender Equality in Justin Trudeau’s Foreign Policy: (Tomasz Soroka)
  • Big Change or Continuation? Canada’s Policy Towards the Situation in Ukraine Under Justin Trudeau: (2015–2020) (Magdalena Marczuk-Karbownik)
  • Rejecting the Colorado Springs Playbook? NORAD in the Age of Trump1: (Joel J. Sokolsky, Joseph T. Jockel)
  • Canada and USA in the Arctic: Finding Solutions for Cooperation in a Constructive Way: (Marilena Drăcea-Chelsoi)
  • Canadian State and Society
  • Constitutional Memories in Canada: Devising the Revision in the Peril of Disunion: (Jeremy Elmerich)
  • Transport Infrastructures and Land Use Geopolitics in Canada: (Luc Ampleman)
  • The Provinces and Canadian Immigration Policy. Evolution and Trends: (Iwona Wrońska)
  • The Role of Community Interpreting in the Formation of the Korean-Canadian Community: (Judit Nagy, Mátyás Bánhegyi)
  • Remarkable and Unexpected Returns from Canada to Poland: (Anna Reczyńska)
  • Frobisher Bay as a Model City of the Future in the Canadian Arctic: (Marcin Gabryś)
  • From Shell Shock to Operational Stress Injury – Canadian (Re)Visions of Approach Towards the Psychological Consequences of Participation in Military Operations: (Magdalena Paluszkiewicz-Misiaczek)
  • Short Bios of the Authors
  • Series index

cover

This publication was jointly financed by the Faculty of International and Political Studies of the Jagiellonian University in Krakow and the Faculty of International and Political Studies of the university of Lodz.

The series International Relations in Asia, Africa and the Americas is edited by the Centre for International Studies and Development of the Jagiellonian University in Kraków.

Cover illustration: Canadian Puzzle Leaf; copyright by Anna Misiaczek.

ISSN 2511-588X ∙ ISBN 978-3-631-81760-5 (Print)

E-ISBN 978-3-631-83838-9 (E-PDF) ∙ E-ISBN 978-3-631-83839-6 (EPUB)
E-ISBN 978-3-631-83840-2 (MOBI) ∙ DOI 10.3726/b17717

© Peter Lang GmbH
Internationaler Verlag der Wissenschaften
Berlin 2020
All rights reserved.

Peter Lang – Berlin ∙ Bern ∙ Bruxelles ∙ New York ∙ Oxford ∙ Warszawa ∙ Wien

All parts of this publication are protected by copyright. Any
utilisation outside the strict limits of the copyright law, without
the permission of the publisher, is forbidden and liable to
prosecution. This applies in particular to reproductions,
translations, microfilming, and storage and processing in
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This work has been peer reviewed.

www.peterlang.com

About the author

Marcin Gabryś is an assistant professor at the Department of Canada of the Institute of American Studies and Polish Diaspora at the Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland. His academic interests concentrate on Canada’s politics, in particular Canadian foreign policy and the northern regions of Canada.

Magdalena Marczuk-Karbownik is an assistant professor at the Department of American Studies and Mass Media, Faculty of International and Politbical Studies, University of Łódź, Poland. Among her interests are: international relations, Transatlantic relations (Canadian perspective), Canadian foreign policy (relations with the U.S., Poland and Ukraine).

Magdalena Paluszkiewicz-Misiaczek is an associate professor of political science, works at the Department of Canada at the Institute of American Studies and Polish Diaspora, Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland. In her research she concentrates on Canadian social and public policy in historical and contemporary perspectives.

About the book

Canada trying to bring together Indigenous peoples, “two solitudes” of the French and the British, as well as a variety of poly-ethnic immigrants has mastered search for consensus and compromise as the best response to national, regional, political and ethnic tensions. This book examines how the evolution of various ideas, schemes, projects, proposals and objectives influenced the Canadian political and social present. It analyses how far Canada was able to realize its initial visions and to what extent it was forced to rework and reform them. It takes into account both the ideas which have actually been implemented and the ones which never progressed beyond the conceptual sphere, yet are important from historical perspective.

This eBook can be cited

This edition of the eBook can be cited. To enable this we have marked the start and end of a page. In cases where a word straddles a page break, the marker is placed inside the word at exactly the same position as in the physical book. This means that occasionally a word might be bifurcated by this marker.

Contents

Marcin Gabryś, Magdalena Marczuk-Karbownik, Magdalena Paluszkiewicz-Misiaczek

Canadian Political, Social and Historical (Re)Visions in the 20th and 21st Centuries?

Canada on International Stage

David Carment, Richard Nimijean

Assessing Canada’s Liberal Internationalism: Where is Canada Headed on the Global Stage?

Tomasz Soroka

Feminism and Gender Equality in Justin Trudeau’s Foreign Policy

Magdalena Marczuk-Karbownik

Big Change or Continuation? Canada’s Policy Towards the Situation in Ukraine Under Justin Trudeau (2015–2020)

Joel J. Sokolsky, Joseph T. Jockel

Rejecting the Colorado Springs Playbook? NORAD in the Age of Trump

Marilena Drăcea-Chelsoi

Canada and USA in the Arctic: Finding Solutions for Cooperation in a Constructive Way

Canadian State and Society

Jeremy Elmerich

Constitutional Memories in Canada: Devising the Revision in the Peril of Disunion

Luc Ampleman

Transport Infrastructures and Land Use Geopolitics in Canada

Iwona Wrońska

The Provinces and Canadian Immigration Policy. Evolution and Trends

Judit Nagy, Mátyás Bánhegyi

The Role of Community Interpreting in the Formation of the Korean-Canadian Community

Anna Reczyńska

Remarkable and Unexpected Returns from Canada to Poland

Marcin Gabryś

Frobisher Bay as a Model City of the Future in the Canadian Arctic

Magdalena Paluszkiewicz-Misiaczek

From Shell Shock to Operational Stress Injury – Canadian (Re)Visions of Approach Towards the Psychological Consequences of Participation in Military Operations

Short Bios of the Authors

←6 | 7→

Marcin Gabryś, Magdalena Marczuk-Karbownik, Magdalena Paluszkiewicz-Misiaczek

Canadian Political, Social and Historical (Re)Visions in the 20th and 21st Centuries?

Over the 153 years since Confederation, Canada has undergone numerous political, social and historical changes. It owes its current form of government, international position and social fabric to certain visions – or revisions – some of which can be traced back at least to the ideas of the Fathers of the Confederation. Many of these (re)visions have sprung from evolutionary and revolutionary ideas or actions taken by individual citizens as well as grassroot initiatives of various social or ethnic groups. Some have been impeded by the reactionary notions of various adversaries.

Canada is a country which, throughout its history, has been trying to bring together Indigenous peoples, the “two solitudes” of the French and the British as well as a huge variety of poly-ethnic immigrants. It thus considers the search for consensus and accommodation of the needs of its diversified population as the best response to a variety of national, regional, political and ethnic tensions and strains. Since 1867, it has been perfecting its “genius for compromise”1, both searching for new visions as well as submitting to revision the already existing solutions. Although not without numerous failures and injustices along the way, this approach has been gaining universal acknowledgement, contributing to the popularity of Canada’s “brand”.

The contributors to this volume have taken up the task of examining how the evolution of various ideas, schemes, projects, proposals and objectives have influenced the foundations of the Canadian political and social present. They have taken account of the visions which actually have been implemented and the ones which never progressed beyond the conceptual sphere, yet are important from a historical perspective. In particular chapters their authors focus on the dilemma how far Canada has been able to realize its initial visions; how often has it been forced to reform them and finally, what Canadian political and ←7 | 8→social life would be like if all the initial ideas had been put into practice without any attempts at redrafting and reworking.

The publication has been divided into two parts. The first one is devoted to the analysis of the position of Canada on the international stage. It opens with a chapter by David Carment and Richard Nimijean, Assessing Canada’s Liberal Internationalism: Where is Canada Headed on the Global Stage? The authors evaluate two competing visions of Canadian foreign policy, the one implemented by Stephen Harper’s Conservative government seeking to restore Canada as a proud and principled country taking tough stands on such issues as terrorism, collective security or the Middle East and Trudeau’s Liberal government promising to restore liberal internationalist values in Canadian foreign policy. Finally, they offer a prediction as to what the fate of the idea of Canada as a middle power might be under conditions of its declining influence and engagement internationally.

Chapter Two by Tomasz Soroka, Feminism and Gender Equality in Justin Trudeau’s Foreign Policy, presents the conceptual vision and main goals of Justin Trudeau’s self-described feminist foreign policy. Soroka analyses Trudeau’s rhetorical promises and commitments and reevaluates them, assessing the effectiveness of the practical actions, programs and initiatives his government has implemented or undertaken internationally.

Chapter Three by Magdalena Marczuk-Karbownik, Big Change or Continuation? Canada’s Policy Towards the situation in Ukraine under Justin Trudeau (2015–2020), presents a comparative evaluation of Canadian policy towards Ukraine under Harper’s Conservative and Trudeau’s Liberal governments. The author presents Ottawa’s engagement in the region aimed at the stabilization of the political and economic situation in Ukraine, being the victim of Russian aggression.

Chapter Four by Joel J. Sokolsky and Joseph T. Jockel, Rejecting the Colorado Springs Playbook? NORAD in the Age of Trump offers a brief overview of the history of the binational, Canadian-American command as well as examination of contemporary issues, particularly those related to rising tensions with the great power rivals China and Russia, threats, ballistic missile defence and matters concerning North American homeland defence and security, including the prospects for changes in the command arrangements. The authors conclude by discussing whether the policy of President Donald Trump will lead to substantial revisions in United States-Canada defence relations.

Chapter Five by Marilena Drăcea-Chelsoi, Canada-USA Cooperation in the Arctic. Efforts When Managing Challenges in a Constructive Way is devoted to evaluation of United States–Canada Arctic cooperation and partnership within ←8 | 9→the scope of the Arctic Council, NORAD and NATO. The author analyses various aspects of US-Canada cooperation – defense, intelligence, environmental protection and the mapping of continental shelves and points out challenges in bilateral relations in the Arctic, with special emphasis of the different stances on the issues of tourism and exploitation of resources.

Part two of the volume, entitled Canadian state and society, focuses on various aspects of Canadian internal and social policy. Its chapters present several (re)visions implemented in response to the following challenges: Quebec separatism, maintaining transport infrastructure, shaping immigration policy, special planning and management in the Arctic and veteran care problem.

Chapter Six by Jeremy Elmerich, Constitutional Memories in Canada: Devising the Revision in the Peril of Disunion offers a (re)vision of the debate on the history of Canada’s French-English founding duality. It analyses the parallel constitutional and identity trajectories that led to a turning point in 1995, when the stake was Canada’s unity itself. The author argues that Canada still has not learned the lesson from the conflicting patterns of misunderstanding and division among its founding peoples and has since remained in a long constitutional winter.

Chapter Seven by Luc Ampleman, Transport Infrastructures and Land Use Geopolitics in Canada discusses the complex conflictual nature of transport initiatives linked to the development, abandonment, transformation and maintenance of transportation systems in Canada. Its author argues that one can capture the complexity of Canadian political geography through an analysis of the land-use implementation of its transport systems and identifies a series of geopolitical paradigms structured around some transport development milestones in the relatively recent national record.

Three subsequent sections of the volume are devoted to different aspects of immigration policy. In Chapter Eight by Iwona Wrońska, The Provinces and Canadian Immigration Policy. Evolution and Trends, the Canadian system of immigration management is discussed. Its author presents how the vision of a federally shaped Canadian immigration policy has been challenged by attempts of provinces and territories to manage their own immigration programs allowing to attract highly skilled economic class immigrants.

In Chapter Nine by Judit Nagy and Mátyás Bánhegyi, The Role of Community Interpreting in the Formation of the Korean-Canadian Community, community interpretation theory and practice is presented on the basis of the example of the Korean-Canadian community. The authors explore the scope of the interpreters’ work in this community and discuss certain linguistic and ←9 | 10→cultural barriers which can influence the quality of interpretation services for ethnic minorities in Canada.

Chapter Ten by Anna Reczyńska, Remarkable and Unexpected Returns from Canada to Poland constitutes a revision of the mainstream of emigration studies in the Polish-Canadian context, where more emphasis has always been put on emigration to Canada rather than return migration to the countries of origin. Its author presents specific and complex vicissitudes of the lives of four people who re-emigrated from Canada to Poland, reconstructing and analysing the circumstances, motivations and conditions which influenced the decisions about returning and points out the necessity to investigate immigrants’ return more thoroughly.

Chapter Eleven by Marcin Gabryś, Frobisher Bay as a Model City of the Future in the Canadian Arctic, focuses on the late 1950s plan of transforming Frobisher City (today’s Iqaluit) into a futuristic city with a system of connected skyscrapers covered by a giant dome. It presents a mid-20th century architectural and urban projection of what modern life might be like in the Arctic, revealing also the patronizing attitude of the federal bureaucracy in Ottawa. At the same time, it offers a chance to see how ideas of Arctic development have changed in Canada over the last sixty years.

In Chapter Twelve, From Shell Shock to Operational Stress Injury - Canadian (Re)Visions of Approach Towards the Psychological Consequences of Participation in Military Operations, Magdalena Paluszkiewicz-Misiaczek focuses on the factors which have led to the introduction of new standards of assessment, treatment, prevention and support for soldiers and veterans suffering from operational stress injury. She puts special emphasis on the instrumental role of veterans whose personal engagement has helped transform the Canadian attitude to service-related mental health problems.

Details

Pages
318
ISBN (PDF)
9783631838389
ISBN (ePUB)
9783631838396
ISBN (MOBI)
9783631838402
ISBN (Hardcover)
9783631817605
Language
English
Publication date
2021 (January)
Published
Berlin, Bern, Bruxelles, New York, Oxford, Warszawa, Wien, 2020. 318 pp., 2 fig. b/w, 5 tables.

Biographical notes

Marcin Gabryś (Volume editor) Magdalena Marczuk-Karbownik (Volume editor) Magdalena Paluszkiewicz-Misiaczek (Volume editor)

Marcin Gabryś is an assistant professor at the Department of Canada of the Institute of American Studies and Polish Diaspora at the Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland. His academic interests concentrate on Canada’s politics, in particular Canadian foreign policy and the northern regions of Canada. Magdalena Marczuk-Karbownik is an assistant professor at the Department of American Studies and Mass Media, Faculty of International and Political Studies, University of Łódź, Poland. Among her interests are: international relations, Transatlantic relations (Canadian perspective), Canadian foreign policy (relations with the U.S., Poland and Ukraine). Magdalena Paluszkiewicz-Misiaczek is an associate professor of political science, works at the Department of Canada at the Institute of American Studies and Polish Diaspora, Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland. In her research she concentrates on Canadian social and public policy in historical and contemporary perspectives.

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Title: Canadian Political, Social and Historical (Re)visions in 20th and 21st Century