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Taiwan Sign Language Interpreting

Theoretical Aspects and Pragmatic Issues

by Riccardo Moratto (Author)
Monographs XXII, 182 Pages

Summary

This book is the first monograph on interpreting issues related to Taiwan Sign Language (TSL). TSL is the language used amongst deaf communities in Taiwan. As far as interpreting from and into TSL is concerned, there are numerous issues and inadequacies to be tackled in terms of the professional identity and the services provided. Research on this issue is crucial because it aims at raising the self-awareness of TSL interpreters and the quality of the interpretation itself. The results of this research monograph have implications for sign language interpreting in regard to research, pedagogy and practice, insofar as they raise the awareness of one’s own professional figure. This seems to be a crucial deontological factor in any discussion related to interpreting rights.

Table Of Content

  • Cover
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • About the author
  • About the book
  • This eBook can be cited
  • Contents
  • List of Tables
  • Foreword
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • List of Abbreviations
  • 1 Introduction
  • 1.1. Introduction
  • 1.2 Research Hypothesis
  • 1.3 Background and Rationale for the Book
  • 1.4 General Method
  • 1.5 The Anticipated Contribution of the Book
  • 1.6 Outline of the Chapters
  • 2 Taiwan Sign Language
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 A Diachronic Analysis of TSL: A Historical Excursus
  • 2.3 Diatopic and Diachronic Variation
  • 2.4 A Historical Journey Toward Dignity
  • 2.4.1 Language “Evolution”: From Hands to Mouth
  • 2.5 Cued Speech
  • 2.6 Manually Coded Languages (MCLs)
  • 2.7 Lip Reading
  • 2.8 Oralism
  • 2.9 Signed Chinese vs. Natural Sign Language
  • 2.10 Concluding Remarks
  • 3 TSL Interpreting
  • 3.1 TSL Interpreting History
  • 3.2 Status Quo of TSL Interpreters
  • 3.3 Professional Volunteers
  • 3.4 Conclusion
  • 4 Challenging Areas in TSL Interpreting
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 The Importance of Metaphors and Figurative Speech
  • 4.3 Diachronic Literature Review
  • 4.4 Iconicity in Sign Languages
  • 4.5 Metaphors in Sign Languages
  • 4.6 Examples from TSL
  • 4.7 Conclusion
  • 5 Empirical Research
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Sign Languages are Natural Languages: Neurolinguistics Evidence
  • 5.3 A Review of Neurolinguistics Research in Simultaneous Interpreting (SI)
  • 5.4 Qualitative and Quantitative Studies
  • 5.4.1 Qualitative Pilot Study: Quality Assessment
  • 5.4.2 Quantitative Pilot Study
  • 5.4.2.1 Participants
  • 5.4.2.2. Materials
  • 5.4.2.3 Tasks
  • 5.4.2.4 Results
  • 5.4.2.5 Discussion
  • 5.5 Concluding Remarks
  • 6 Assessment and Evaluation in TSL Interpreting
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Assessment and Evaluation
  • 6.3 The Issue of Interpreting Quality
  • 6.4 Taiwan Sign Language Interpreting Assessment and Evaluation (TSLIAE)
  • 6.4.1. EIPA
  • 6.4.2 TSLIAE
  • 6.4.3. The Issue of “Naturality”: Natural Sign Language (NSL) vs. Manual Sign Language (MSL)
  • 6.5 Tentative New TSLIAE (nTSLIAE) Evaluation Sheet
  • 6.6 Conclusion and Limitations
  • 7 Conclusion
  • 7.1 A Review of the Chapters
  • 7.2 Concluding Remarks and Future Research
  • 7.3 Limitations of the Book
  • Dictionaries of Taiwan Sign Language Used
  • Appendix
  • Index

cover

About the author

Dr. Riccardo Moratto 莫冉, nom de plume 韋佳德 (韦佳德 in simplified Chinese characters), courtesy name 遠復 (远复 in simplified Chinese characters), is a scholar of Translation and Interpreting Studies. He is an expert member (专家会员) of the Translators Association of China (TAC, 中国翻译协会). He is the author of Introduzione alla sinografia, Taiwan Sign Language Interpreting: Theoretical Aspects and Pragmatic Issues, two books in Chinese, and the chief editor of several other academic volumes. He has published in various professional magazines, conference proceedings, edited books, and international leading indexed journals, such as AHCI-listed (Arts and Humanities Citation Index-listed) journals. He has also been a manuscript reviewer for many prestigious, international journals. Dr. Moratto has published widely in the fields of translation and interpreting studies, Taiwan sign language, Chinese studies, Chinese language, and Chinese literature. In 2013, he obtained his Ph.D. from National Taiwan Normal University (NTNU). Over the years, he has taught at several universities including Hunan Normal University, Fujen Catholic University, Taipei National University of the Arts, Shih Chien University, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, and National Taipei University of Business. He is a professional interpreter and a literary translator. His most recent work focuses on Chinese modern and contemporary literature, interpreting history in China, translation and cultural identities, public service interpreting, media interpreting, and the interdisciplinary nature of interpreting studies.

Details

Pages
XXII, 182
ISBN (PDF)
9781433180958
ISBN (ePUB)
9781433180965
ISBN (MOBI)
9781433180972
ISBN (Hardcover)
9781433177439
Language
English
Publication date
2020 (November)
Published
New York, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, Oxford, Wien, 2020. XXII, 182 pp.,12 tables.

Biographical notes

Riccardo Moratto (Author)

Dr. Riccardo Moratto 莫冉, nom de plume 韋佳德 (韦佳德 in simplified Chinese characters), courtesy name 遠復 (远复 in simplified Chinese characters), is a scholar of Translation and Interpreting Studies. He is an expert member (专家会员) of the Translators Association of China (TAC, 中国翻译协会). He is the author of Introduzione alla sinografia, Taiwan Sign Language Interpreting: Theoretical Aspects and Pragmatic Issues, two books in Chinese, and the chief editor of several other academic volumes. He has published in various professional magazines, conference proceedings, edited books, and international leading indexed journals, such as AHCI-listed (Arts and Humanities Citation Index-listed) journals. He has also been a manuscript reviewer for many prestigious, international journals. Dr. Moratto has published widely in the fields of translation and interpreting studies, Taiwan sign language, Chinese studies, Chinese language, and Chinese literature. In 2013, he obtained his Ph.D. from National Taiwan Normal University (NTNU). Over the years, he has taught at several universities including Hunan Normal University, Fujen Catholic University, Taipei National University of the Arts, Shih Chien University, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, and National Taipei University of Business. He is a professional interpreter and a literary translator. His most recent work focuses on Chinese modern and contemporary literature, interpreting history in China, translation and cultural identities, public service interpreting, media interpreting, and the interdisciplinary nature of interpreting studies.

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Title: Taiwan Sign Language Interpreting