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Energising Directed Motivational Currents through Learners’ Agency

by Arkadiusz Pietluch (Author)
Monographs 254 Pages

Summary

This book attempts to demystify concerns surrounding a novel motivational construct known as a Directed Motivational Current. The study aimed at exploring whether a high sense of efficacy may support a person in transforming short-spanned motivational episodes into longitudinal engagement typical for the DMC framework. To this end, a sequential exploratory mixed methodology was used. Subsequently, a link between well-anchored efficacy beliefs and the rate at which DMCs occur was indeed discovered. This was further reinforced by the outcomes of personalised interviews. Eventually, the research yielded several noteworthy conclusions, including the fact that imbuing the DMC structure with elements of efficacy building may lead to long-term, sustained behaviour in a foreign language classroom.

Table Of Contents

  • Cover
  • Front Matter
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • About the book
  • About the author
  • This eBook can be cited
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
  • CONTENTS
  • INTRODUCTION
  • CHAPTER I A general overview of Second Language Acquisition theory
  • 1.1. The Second Language Acquisition Theory
  • 1.1.1. Acquisition versus Learning dichotomy
  • 1.1.2. Second Language Acquisition – chief hypotheses
  • 1.2. Psychological factors affecting SLA
  • 1.2.1. Anxiety
  • 1.2.2. Motivation
  • 1.2.3. Self-confidence
  • 1.3. The Social Cognitive theory
  • 1.4. The concept of self-efficacy
  • 1.4.1. Sources of self-efficacy beliefs
  • 1.4.1.1. Enactive mastery experiences
  • 1.4.1.2. Vicarious learning
  • 1.4.1.3. Verbal persuasion
  • 1.4.1.4. Physiological and affective states
  • 1.4.2. Efficacy-activated processes
  • 1.4.2.1. Cognitive processes
  • 1.4.2.2. Motivational processes
  • 1.4.2.3. Affective processes
  • 1.4.2.4. Selection processes
  • 1.4.3. Self-constructs
  • 1.5. Individual differences in language learning
  • 1.5.1. Age
  • 1.5.2. Gender
  • 1.5.3. Language aptitude
  • 1.5.4. Personality
  • 1.5.5. Learning styles
  • 1.5.6. Learning strategies
  • Summary
  • CHAPTER II Features of a DMC within motivational frameworks
  • 2.1. Directed Motivational Currents
  • 2.1.1. Goal-orientedness
  • 2.1.2. Structural properties of a motivational drive
  • 2.1.3. Positive emotionality
  • 2.2. Elements of a DMC within motivational frameworks
  • 2.2.1. Goal-setting theory
  • 2.2.2. Flow theory
  • 2.2.3. Planned behaviour theory
  • 2.2.4. Self-determination theory
  • 2.2.5. Future time perspective
  • 2.2.6. Theories of self-imagery
  • 2.2.7. Dynamic systems theory
  • 2.2.8. Process-oriented approaches
  • 2.2.9. Somatic Marker Hypothesis
  • Summary
  • CHAPTER III Facilitating a DMC occurrence through self-efficacy beliefs
  • 3.1. Research design – description
  • 3.2. Research population
  • 3.3. Apparatus and data collection
  • 3.3.1. General Self-Efficacy Scale
  • 3.3.2. DMC Disposition Questionnaire
  • 3.3.3. Data collection procedure
  • 3.4. Research study – findings, evaluation, analysis and conclusions
  • 3.4.1. General Self-efficacy Questionnaire – findings
  • 3.4.2. General Self-Efficacy Scale – evaluation and analysis of the results
  • 3.4.2.1. The degree of resourcefulness
  • 3.4.2.2. Effort expenditure tendencies
  • 3.4.2.3. Overcoming ruminative thoughts
  • 3.4.2.4. Goal-orientedness
  • 3.4.2.5. Feeling of superiority
  • 3.4.2.6. Concluding remarks
  • 3.4.3. DMC Disposition Questionnaire – findings
  • 3.4.3.1. DMC Disposition Questionnaire – evaluation and analysis of the results
  • 3.4.3.2. DMC as a prolonged form of motivational engagement
  • 3.4.3.3. Positive emotionality
  • 3.4.3.4 Determination bordering on obsession
  • 3.4.3.5. Facilitative structure and behavioural routines
  • 3.4.3.6. Concluding remarks
  • 3.4.4. Self-efficacy as a facilitator of the DMC phenomenon
  • 3.4.5. Discussion and concluding remarks
  • 3.4.6. Limitations and recommendations for future research
  • Summary
  • CHAPTER IV Individual DMC cases – an in-depth analysis
  • 4.1. Introduction
  • 4.2. Sampling procedure
  • 4.3. The participants
  • 4.4. Apparatus
  • 4.5. Validity
  • 4.6. Phenomenological considerations
  • 4.7. Ethical considerations
  • 4.8. Discussion of the results
  • 4.8.1. The evolutional trajectory of efficacy beliefs
  • 4.8.2. Results
  • 4.8.3. Concluding remarks
  • 4.8.4. Structural properties of a DMC
  • 4.8.5. Concluding remarks
  • Summary
  • CHAPTER V Inducing a DMC at the classroom level through efficacy building techniques
  • 5.1. Introduction and rationale for the experiment
  • 5.2. Former attempts
  • 5.3. Engineering a DMC framework
  • 5.3.1. Efficacy building techniques
  • 5.3.2. Facilitating motivational gain through the inclusion of DMC properties
  • 5.4. The experiment – methodology
  • 5.4.1. The setting of the experiment
  • 5.4.2. Participants
  • 5.4.3. Triggering group DMC
  • 5.4.4. Results and discussion
  • 5.4.5. Concluding remarks
  • 5.4.6. Limitations of the project and recommendations for further study
  • 5.5. Pedagogical implications
  • Summary
  • CONCLUSIONS
  • REFERENCES
  • Summary
  • APPENDICES
  • APPENDIX 1 Homework – My desired self
  • APPENDIX 2 General Self- Efficacy Scale
  • APPENDIX 3 DMC Disposition Questionnaire
  • APPENDIX 4 Speaking Self- Efficacy Scale
  • APPENDIX 5 Summaries
  • APPENDIX 6 Teaching curriculum – description, aims, and requirements
  • Index of Names

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STUDIES IN LINGUISTICS, ANGLOPHONE LITERATURES AND CULTURES

Edited by Robert Kiełtyka and Agnieszka Uberman

Advisory Board:

Réka Benczes (Budapest, Hungary)

Zoltán Kövecses (Budapest, Hungary)

Anna Malicka-Kleparska (Lublin, Poland)

Sándor Martsa (Pécs, Hungary)

Rafał Molencki (Katowice, Poland)

Tadeusz Rachwał (Warsaw, Poland)

Elżbieta Rokosz-Piejko (Rzeszów, Poland)

Slávka Tomaščíková (Košice, Slovakia)

VOLUME 30

Notes on the quality assurance and peer review of this publication

Prior to publication, the quality of the work published in this series is reviewed by the editors and members of Advisory Board of the series.

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Arkadiusz Pietluch

Energising Directed Motivational Currents Through Learners’ Agency

←3  | 4→Bibliographic Information published by the Deutsche Nationalbibliothek The Deutsche Nationalbibliothek lists this publication in the Deutsche Nationalbibliografie; detailed bibliographic data is available online at http://dnb.d-nb.de.

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

A CIP catalog record for this book has been applied for at the Library of Congress.

This publication was financially supported by the University of Rzeszów.

This work has been reviewed by Przemysław Krakowian (University of Łódź).

Cover illustration: Courtesy of Benjamin Ben Chaim

ISSN 2364-7558

ISBN 978-3-631-85100-5 (Print)

E-ISBN 978-3-631-85101-2 (E-PDF)

E-ISBN 978-3-631-85102-9 (EPUB)

E-ISBN 978-3-631-85103-6 (MOBI)

DOI 10.3726/b18212

© Peter Lang GmbH

Internationaler Verlag der Wissenschaften

Berlin 2021

All rights reserved.

Peter Lang – Berlin ∙ Bern ∙ Bruxelles ∙ New York ∙ Oxford ∙ Warszawa ∙ Wien

All parts of this publication are protected by copyright. Any utilisation outside the strict limits of the copyright law, without the permission of the publisher, is forbidden and liable to prosecution. This applies in particular to reproductions, translations, microfilming, and storage and processing in electronic retrieval systems.

This publication has been peer reviewed.

www.peterlang.com

About the author

The Author

Arkadiusz Pietluch is a research associate at the University of Rzeszów, where he currently teaches subjects such as phonetics, phonology, and practical English. His areas of academic interest include bilingualism and the impact of psychological variables on human cognition.

About the book

Arkadiusz Pietluch

Energising Directed Motivational Currents Through Learners’ Agency

This book attempts to demystify concerns surrounding a novel motivational construct known as a Directed Motivational Current. The study aimed at exploring whether a high sense of efficacy may support a person in transforming short-spanned motivational episodes into longitudinal engagement typical for the DMC framework. To this end, a sequential exploratory mixed methodology was used. Subsequently, a link between well-anchored efficacy beliefs and the rate at which DMCs occur was indeed discovered. This was further reinforced by the outcomes of personalised interviews. Eventually, the research yielded several noteworthy conclusions, including the fact that imbuing the DMC structure with elements of efficacy building may lead to long-term, sustained behaviour in a foreign language classroom.

This eBook can be cited

This edition of the eBook can be cited. To enable this we have marked the start and end of a page. In cases where a word straddles a page break, the marker is placed inside the word at exactly the same position as in the physical book. This means that occasionally a word might be bifurcated by this marker.

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

First and foremost, with deep gratitude and profound humility, I would like to express my gratefulness to my supervisor and mentor, Professor Agnieszka Uberman, who expertly guided me through my doctoral education. I would never have finished my dissertation had it not been for her unwavering enthusiasm, unflinching support, and immense wisdom. Her encouragement, advice, and constructive criticism have been a source of exceptional inspiration which not only enriched my growth as a student but, more importantly, as a person. I would forever be grateful for instilling in me the qualities of being a good researcher and the unlimited liberty I have been granted while shaping the course of my pursuit. I will benefit from this intellectual nourishment my entire life.

Above ground, I am fully indebted to PhD Magdalena Trinder, whose mentoring has been especially valuable, and her insights and early support launched the greater part of this dissertation. She has always been a significant source of encouragement and instilled in me the spirit of ambition, commitment, and intellectual open-mindedness. Her invaluable friendship has been continually pushing me farther than I thought I could go. Apart from being an exceptional example of academic excellence, Magdalena is a generous, compassionate, and caring person with a kind heart. I owe you a cordial thanks for always having the confidence in me. Your support and friendship have been irreplaceable on both an academic and a personal level.

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CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

CHAPTER I A general overview of Second Language Acquisition theory

1.1. The Second Language Acquisition Theory

1.1.1. Acquisition versus Learning dichotomy

1.1.2. Second Language Acquisition – chief hypotheses

1.2. Psychological factors affecting SLA

1.2.1. Anxiety

1.2.2. Motivation

1.2.3. Self-confidence

1.3. The Social Cognitive theory

1.4. The concept of self-efficacy

1.4.1. Sources of self-efficacy beliefs

1.4.1.1. Enactive mastery experiences

1.4.1.2. Vicarious learning

1.4.1.3. Verbal persuasion

1.4.1.4. Physiological and affective states

1.4.2. Efficacy-activated processes

1.4.2.1. Cognitive processes

1.4.2.2. Motivational processes

1.4.2.3. Affective processes

1.4.2.4. Selection processes

1.4.3. Self-constructs

Details

Pages
254
ISBN (PDF)
9783631851012
ISBN (ePUB)
9783631851029
ISBN (MOBI)
9783631851036
ISBN (Hardcover)
9783631851005
Language
English
Publication date
2021 (March)
Tags
sustained motivation learners‘ agency mixed research methodology SLA individual variables
Published
Berlin, Bern, Bruxelles, New York, Oxford, Warszawa, Wien, 2021. 254 pp., 2 fig. b/w, 12 tables.

Biographical notes

Arkadiusz Pietluch (Author)

Arkadiusz Pietluch is a research associate at the University of Rzeszów, where he currently teaches subjects such as phonetics, phonology, and practical English. His areas of academic interest include bilingualism and the impact of psychological variables on human cognition.

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Title: Energising Directed Motivational Currents through Learners’ Agency