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Narrative Change Management in American Studies

A Pragmatic Reading

by Silke Schmidt (Author)
Postdoctoral Thesis 468 Pages

Summary

Management means getting things done. How can research on the theory and practice of management help American Studies move forward? This book offers a pragmatic approach to bridging the gap between the humanities and business studies. Based on a critical reading of the disciplinary cultures of American Studies and Business School education, the book analyses narratives of U.S. management theorists and practitioners, including Peter F. Drucker, Mary Cunningham, and John P. Kotter. The stories help readers acquire effective management and leadership tools for application-oriented humanities in the digital age. "With her outsider perspective on the discourse in management research and application, Schmidt proposes interesting questions that can turn into fruitful research issues in Business Studies and its interdisciplinary exchange with American Studies. I hope this book falls on open ears." – Evelyn Korn "Schmidt did pioneering work by taking the risk of entering novel terrain to show new paths for the further development of American Studies." – Carmen Birkle

Details

Pages
468
ISBN (PDF)
9783631849675
ISBN (ePUB)
9783631849682
ISBN (MOBI)
9783631849699
ISBN (Book)
9783631843093
Language
English
Publication date
2021 (June)
Tags
American Studies Business Studies Management Literature Business Schools Disciplinary Culture
Published
Berlin, Bern, Bruxelles, New York, Oxford, Warszawa, Wien, 2021. 468 pp., 32 fig. b/w.

Biographical notes

Silke Schmidt (Author)

Silke Schmidt is a researcher and entrepreneur from Germany. She studied American Studies, Political Science, and Communication in Mainz and Philadelphia. She earned her Ph.D. in American Studies at Marburg University in 2013. In 2018, she was awarded the venia legendi in American Studies for her habilitation on management literature and culture. She promotes application-oriented humanities, university-business collaboration, and public science communication.

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Title: Narrative Change Management in American Studies