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A Contribution to the Empirics of Economic and Human Development

by Sebastian Vollmer (Author)
©2010 Thesis XVI, 139 Pages
Open Access
  • eBook

Summary

This book contributes to the empirical literature on economic and human development from five different perspectives: the first chapter provides a new statistical test for bimodality of densities with an application to income data. The second chapter analyzes the worlds cross-country distribution of income and challenges the so called Twin Peaks-claim. The third chapter focuses on the world income distribution and resulting implications for poverty reduction, pro-poor growth and the evolution of global inequality. The fourth chapter estimates the welfare effects of recently negotiated Economic Partnership Agreements between the EU and African countries. Finally, the fifth chapter investigates whether democracy leads to higher levels of health and education.

Details

Pages
XVI, 139
Year
2010
ISBN (PDF)
9783631753491
ISBN (Hardcover)
9783631587935
DOI
10.3726/b13871
Open Access
CC-BY
Language
English
Publication date
2018 (September)
Keywords
Likelihood-Ratio-Test for Bimodality Cross-Country Income Distribution Economic Partnership Agreements World Income Distribution Demogracy and Human Development
Published
Frankfurt am Main, Berlin, Bern, Bruxelles, New York, Oxford, Wien, 2009. XVI, 139 pp., num. fig. and tables

Biographical notes

Sebastian Vollmer (Author)

The Author: Sebastian Vollmer, born in Stadtoldendorf in 1980, studied Mathematics and Economics at the University of Göttingen and Colorado College, Colorado Springs (USA). Between 2006 and 2009 he was a Ph.D. Candidate at the Department of Economics at the University of Göttingen and completed the Ph.D. Program Applied Statistics and Empirical Methods of the Center for Statistics at the University of Göttingen. During this time he also worked as a consultant to the World Bank’s World Development Report 2009. Presently, the author is conducting postdoctoral research at the University of Hannover and Harvard University.

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Title: A Contribution to the Empirics of Economic and Human Development