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Science Fiction Curriculum, Cyborg Teachers, and Youth Culture(s)

by John A. Weaver (Volume editor) Karen Anijar (Volume editor) Toby Daspit (Volume editor)
Textbook IX, 250 Pages
Series: Counterpoints, Volume 158

Summary

Science Fiction Curriculum, Cyborg Teachers, and Youth Culture(s) is a collection of essays sutured together by their use of science fiction as a departure from contemporary educational «realities». The authors, inspired by the visions, styles, and insights of various science fiction texts, films, and rap music, seek to transform the future of educational possibilities. Science Fiction Curriculum offers alternative paths to current regressive educational practices, policies, and reforms, and invites readers to venture into uncharted dimensions.

Details

Pages
IX, 250
ISBN (Softcover)
9780820450445
Language
English
Published
New York, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, Frankfurt/M., Oxford, Wien, 2003. IX, 250 pp.

Biographical notes

John A. Weaver (Volume editor) Karen Anijar (Volume editor) Toby Daspit (Volume editor)

The Editors: John A. Weaver is Associate Professor at Georgia Southern University. He has co-edited, with Toby Daspit, Popular Culture and Critical Pedagogy (2000), with Peter Appelbaum and Marla Morris (Post) Modern Science (Education) (Peter Lang, 2001), with Marla Morris Difficult Memories: Talk in a (Post) Holocaust Era (Peter Lang, 2002) and is the author of Rethinking Academic Politics in (Re)Unified Germany and the United States (2001). Karen Anijar is an Assistant Professor in the College of Education, Division of Curriculum and Instruction at Arizona State University. Her most recent book is Teaching Toward the 24th Century: Star Trek as Social Curriculum. She has also written on the political economy, time in curriculum, critical multiculturalism, Elvis, Selena, Chupacabras, apocalypse and milleniarism. Toby Daspit is an assistant professor in the department of teaching, learning, and Leadership at Western Michigan University. He is the co-editor, with John A. Weaver, of Popular Culture and Critical Pedagogy (2000), and Imagining the Academy: Higher Education and Popular Culture (forthcoming) with Susan Edgerton and Gunilla Holm. He is also the co-author, with Pamela Dean and Petra Munro, of Talking Gumbo: A Teacher’s Guide to Oral History in the Classroom (1998).

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Title: Science Fiction Curriculum, Cyborg Teachers, and Youth Culture(s)