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Public Relations Case Studies from Around the World (2nd Edition)

by Judy VanSlyke Turk (Volume editor) Jean Valin (Volume editor)
©2017 Textbook XX, 386 Pages

Summary

The case studies in this book, many of which have won national or international awards, represent an impressive scope of public relations practice—from public diplomacy to corporate social responsibility to crisis communications to social justice issues and special events. These chapters take a significant step toward overcoming the dearth of published case studies in public relations beyond North America. Written by established scholars and professionals who had access to some of the world’s most intriguing and influential cases of organizational communication, these studies will be of tremendous interest to all who teach, study, and practice public relations around the world.

Table Of Contents

  • Cover
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • About the author(s)/editor(s)
  • About the book
  • This eBook can be cited
  • Contents
  • List of Illustrations and Tables
  • Introduction from the Editors
  • Foreword: What Case Studies Can Teach us in International Public Relations
  • Preface
  • Part One: Case Studies in Global Campaigns
  • Chapter One: Volkswagen Emission Scandal: An Example of Bad Public Relations on a Global Scale and the “Defeat Device” that Defeated a Reputation (Shannon A. Bowen / Don W. Stacks / Donald K. Wright)
  • Introduction
  • The Problem
  • Volkswagen
  • The Scandal
  • Scandal Media Coverage
  • Media Themes
  • Volkswagen’s Response
  • Case Analysis
  • Reputational Impact
  • Inferring Motive
  • Issues Management
  • Actions
  • From the Excellence Campaign Perspective
  • The Excellence Pyramid
  • Summary
  • Postscript
  • Authors’ Note
  • Notes
  • References
  • Chapter Two: Chile Becomes a World Player of the Wine Industry: The Legend of “Casillero del Diablo” (Juan-Carlos Molleda / Francisco Solanich)
  • Background
  • Situation Analysis
  • “Old World” VS “New World” Wine
  • Goal
  • Target Audiences
  • Strategy
  • Tactics
  • Sponsorship of Manchester United
  • Key Messages for the Sponsorship
  • Evaluation and Measurement
  • Notes
  • References
  • Part Two: Case Studies in Corporate Social Responsibility
  • Chapter Three: Cargill’s Indonesian Palm Oil Sustainability Program (Zifei Fay Chen / Don W. Stacks / Yi Grace Ji / BO RA Yook)
  • Background
  • Methodology
  • The Problem
  • Palm Oil
  • Environmental Impact
  • Cargill
  • Overview of Cargill’s Palm Oil Sustainability Program
  • Situation Analysis
  • Core Opportunities and Challenges
  • Goals and Objectives
  • Research
  • Key Stakeholders
  • Key Messages
  • Strategies and Tactics
  • Calendar/Timetable
  • Budget
  • Evaluation and Measurement
  • Excellence Campaign Pyramid
  • Evaluating Cargill’s Palm Oil Sustainability Program at the Basic Level
  • Intermediate Outcomes
  • Advanced Outcomes
  • Summary
  • Authors’ Note
  • References
  • Chapter Four: Sharing “Made in Italy”: Intesa Sanpaolo Bank’s Cultural Communication around World Expo 2015 (Valentina Martino / Alessandro Lovari)
  • Introduction and Background
  • Company Profile
  • Communication and CSR Policies
  • Artistic Cultural Policies
  • Methodology
  • Situation Analysis
  • Core Opportunity
  • Goals
  • Objectives
  • Key Publics
  • Key Messages
  • Strategies
  • Tactics
  • Internal Communication
  • Advertising
  • B-to-B Communication
  • Corporate Pavilion
  • Events
  • Media Relations
  • Digital Communication
  • Calendar/Timetable
  • Budget
  • Evaluation and Measurement
  • Media Coverage
  • Brand Reputation and Equity
  • Awards
  • Conclusions
  • Aknowledgments
  • Notes
  • References
  • Part Three: Cases in Public Diplomacy
  • Chapter Five: Japan Is Back: The International Public Relations of the Second Abe Administration (Koichi Yamamura / Masamichi Shimizu / Nancy Snow)
  • Background
  • Situation Analysis
  • Core Opportunity
  • Goals
  • Objectives
  • Key Publics
  • Key Messages
  • Strategies
  • Tactics
  • Communications by Prime Minister Abe
  • Website
  • Social Media
  • TV Advertisements
  • We Are Tomodachi
  • Walk in U.S., Talk on Japan
  • Japan Library
  • JapanGov Weekly
  • Abenomics Is Progressing
  • Media Relations
  • Calendar/Timetable
  • Budget
  • Evaluation and Measurement
  • Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter Six: “Ukraine: Open for U”: A Promotional Campaign and Nation Re-branding After the Euromaidan (Dariya Orlova / Katerina Tsetsura)
  • Introduction
  • Background
  • Situation Analysis
  • Core Opportunity
  • Goals and Objectives
  • Key Publics
  • Key Messages
  • Strategies
  • Tactics
  • Calendar/Timetable
  • Budget
  • Evaluation and Measurement
  • Critique of the Campaign
  • Conclusion
  • Notes
  • References
  • Part Four: Cases in Measurement and Reputation Research of Public Relations
  • Chapter Seven: A Real-time, Integrated and Actionable Measurement System (Katie Delahaye Paine)
  • Background
  • Situation Analysis
  • Core Opportunity
  • Goals
  • Objectives
  • Key Publics
  • Key Messages
  • Strategy
  • Tactics
  • Defining Acceptable Proxies for “Visits”
  • Defining “Good Press”
  • Defining Consideration and Preference
  • Social Media Measurement
  • Evaluation Methodology
  • Initial Measurement Program Design
  • Data Collection
  • Spelling Out the Details
  • Tweaking the Coding
  • Reporting
  • Testing Patience as Well as Validity
  • Putting the Data to Work to Mitigate a Crisis
  • Calendar/Timetable
  • Budget
  • Evaluation of the Measurement Program
  • Appendix 1 Detailed Methodology and Definitions (DMD) for ACA
  • General Restrictions
  • Brands
  • Media Tiers
  • Markets
  • Date
  • Media Source and Author
  • Reach (Opportunities to See)
  • Desirability/Sentiment
  • Message Presence
  • Negative/Opposite Messages
  • Effectiveness of Thought Leaders
  • Prominence/Visibility
  • Casino Names
  • Programs
  • Subjects
  • Chapter Eight: The Impact of Corporate Reputation on Behavior: AkzoNobel and Zurich Insurance (Sandra Macleod / John A. Mclaren / Kevin Money)
  • Backgrounder
  • Situation Analysis: Akzonobel—Is Having a Famous Product Brand Enough?
  • Core Opportunity
  • Research Brief
  • Research Approach
  • Findings
  • Results
  • Situation Analysis 2 Zurich Insurance—Building an Integrated Reputation Measurement Platform (Dashboard)
  • Core Opportunity
  • Research Brief
  • Research Approach
  • Results
  • Other Findings
  • Key Points About these Two Cases
  • References
  • Chapter Nine: “Stoner Sloth”: Lessons from Evaluation of Social Media and Virality (Jim Macnamara / Gail Kenning)
  • Introduction
  • Background
  • Goal
  • Communication Objectives
  • Target Publics
  • Key Messages
  • Communication Strategy and Activities
  • Timetable
  • Budget
  • Measurement and Evaluation
  • Methodology
  • Content Analysis
  • Survey
  • Outputs
  • Outtakes
  • A Tsunami of Criticism Gathers Force
  • Outcomes
  • Segmented Analysis and Synthesis for Insights
  • Conclusion
  • Notes
  • References
  • Part Five: Cases in Crisis Communications
  • Chapter Ten: #Indeepsorrow: Lufthansa’s Agile Crisis Communication Management During and After the Crash of Germanwings Flight 4U9525 (Swaran Sandhu / Simone Huck-Sandhu)
  • Backgrounder
  • Scope of the Case
  • Methodology
  • Situation Analysis
  • Core Opportunity and Challenge
  • Goals
  • Objectives
  • Key Publics
  • Victims’ Families
  • Employees
  • Passengers and Partners
  • Local Communities
  • Media
  • Political Authorities and Trade Associations
  • Key Messages
  • Strategies and Tactics
  • Budget and Evaluation
  • Lessons Learned—Agile Crisis Communications
  • Appendix: Timeline
  • References
  • Chapter Eleven: The African Union Commission’s Multinational Ebola Campaign’s Localization Strategies (Toluwani C. Oloke / Juan-Carlos Molleda)
  • Background
  • Situation Analysis
  • Core Opportunity
  • Goals
  • Objectives
  • Key Publics
  • Strategies
  • Ability to Localize
  • Grassroots Mobilizations
  • Selective Personnel Deployment and Message Translations
  • Re-orientation of Local Publics
  • Humanitarian Donations of Relief Materials
  • Message Sensitivity to Strong Religious and Cultural Beliefs and Ties
  • Key Messages
  • Message Scripting
  • Tactics
  • Localization of Tactics
  • Methodology
  • Budget
  • Evaluation and Measurement
  • References
  • Part Six: Cases Addressing National Opportunities
  • Chapter Twelve: It’s All in the Name: The Story of the Campaign for Marriage Equality in Ireland (Dr. John Gallagher)
  • Background
  • Situation Analysis
  • Core Opportunity
  • Goals
  • Objectives
  • Calendar/Timetable
  • Key Publics
  • Key Messages
  • Strategies
  • Tactics
  • The Campaign Bus
  • The Daily Briefing Book
  • Media Outside Dublin
  • Monitoring Broadcasts and Responding
  • Controlling the Campaign
  • National Publication
  • New Voter Registration Campaign
  • The Vote Hardens
  • Canvassing Network
  • The Opposition
  • Celebrities
  • The Final Push
  • Budget
  • Evaluation and Measurement
  • References
  • Glossary of Terms
  • Chapter Thirteen: Communicating Food Safety in the Highly Multicultural Country of Kuwait (Mariam F. Alkazemi / Fahed AL-Sumait / Cristina Navarro)
  • Background
  • Methodology
  • Situation Analysis
  • Strengths
  • Weaknesses
  • Opportunities
  • Threats
  • Core Opportunity
  • Goals
  • Objectives
  • Key Publics
  • Key Messages
  • Strategies
  • Tactics
  • Calendar/Timetable
  • Budget
  • Evaluation and Measurement
  • References
  • Chapter Fourteen: Mead Johnson: Infant Formula to Make a Difference in China (Chun-Ju Flora Hung-Baesecke / Xiaohong Chen / Xiaodong Vin)
  • Introduction
  • Background
  • Project Research
  • Goals and Objectives
  • Key Publics
  • Key Messages
  • Strategies
  • Tactics
  • Supporting PKU Patients and Their Families
  • Technical Training and Health Education
  • High-level Government Meetings on PKU
  • Evaluation and Measurement
  • Effectiveness of Communication Actions
  • Immediate Effects
  • Media Reports
  • Testimony by Project Participants
  • Summary
  • CSR Activities Aligned with the Corporate Values and Vision
  • Social Connectedness of CSR
  • Building Trust via CSR Efforts
  • Partnering with Strategic Stakeholders
  • The Next Step
  • References
  • Chapter Fifteen: The GST Campaign: Convincing Malaysians to Accept a New Taxation System (Kiranjit Kaur)
  • Background
  • Situation Analysis
  • Core Opportunity
  • Goal
  • Objectives
  • Key Publics
  • Key Messages
  • Strategies
  • Tactics
  • Timeline
  • Evaluation and Measurement
  • Evaluation of Dissemination of Identified Key Messages
  • Evaluation of Publications
  • Media Engagement, Publicity and Promotional Collaterals
  • Author’s Note
  • Notes
  • References
  • Chapter Sixteen: Restoring Confidence in a Global Company and Healthcare Brand in Brazil: The Bayer Jovens Youth Education Campaign (Paulo Nassar / Terence (Terry) Flynn)
  • Background
  • Bayer in Brazil
  • Situation Analysis
  • Core Opportunity
  • Objectives
  • Key Publics
  • Key Messages
  • Strategies
  • Tactics
  • Quality Original Content
  • Career
  • Science
  • Behavior
  • Culture and Leisure
  • Innovation
  • Health and Well Being
  • Social Media: Facebook and Twitter
  • Calendar/Timetable
  • Budget
  • Evaluation and Measurement (2013–2016)
  • References
  • Chapter Seventeen: Reaching for the Stars: The Launch of the UAE Space Agency (Inka Stever / Dr. Gaelle Picherit Duthler)
  • Background
  • Situation Analysis
  • Strengths
  • Weaknesses
  • Opportunities
  • Threats
  • Core Opportunity
  • Goals
  • Key Publics
  • Objectives
  • Key Messages
  • Strategies
  • Tactics
  • Calendar/Timetable
  • Budget
  • Evaluation and Measurement
  • References
  • Chapter Eighteen: A Taste of Harmony: Awareness and Celebration of Cultural Diversity in Australian Workplaces (Ingrid Larkin / Robina Xavier)
  • Background
  • Situation Analysis
  • Core Opportunity
  • Goals
  • Objectives
  • Key Publics
  • Key Messages
  • Strategies
  • Tactics
  • A Taste of Harmony Brand
  • A Taste of Harmony Website and Online Tools
  • Online Event Hub
  • Ambassadors
  • Food Truck Activations
  • Connecting with Influencers and Decision Makers
  • Digital and Social Media Channels
  • Media Relations
  • Other Tactics
  • Calendar/Timetable
  • Budget
  • Evaluation and Measurement
  • References
  • Contributors
  • Editors
  • Case Study Authors (Listed Alphabetically)
  • Index

| ix →

List OF Illustrations AND Tables

CHAPTER 1

1.1. Comparative car sales chart, worldwide. Credit: Russell, K., Gates, G., Keller, J., & Watkins, D. (NY Times, 2015, November 25).

1.2. The deception “defeat device”. Credit: Russell, K., Gates, G., Keller, J., & Watkins, D. (New York Times, 2015, November 25).

1.3. Media relations timeline. Author’s creation.

1.4. Media coverage worldwide. Author’s creation.

1.5. Campaign excellence pyramid. Author’s creation.

1.6. Research timeline. Author’s creation.

1.7. Volkswagen scandal timeline.

CHAPTER 2

2.1. Casillero del diablo label. Public domain, acknowledgment to Concha y Toro.

2.2. Casillero del diablo Facebook page. Public domain, acknowledgment to Concha y Toro.

CHAPTER 3

3.1. The excellence pyramid. Authors’ creation. ← ix | x →

CHAPTER 4

4.1. The strategic partnership with World Expo 2015: Intesa Sanpaolo Bank SWOT analysis. Author’s creation.

4.2. Photo. The Waterstone pavilion in World Expo 2015: internal view. Credit: © Ph. Maurizio Tosto—Intesa Sanpaolo EXPO Milano 2015.

4.3. Photo. The Waterstone pavilion: external view. Source: © Ph. Maurizio Tosto—Intesa Sanpaolo EXPO Milano 2015.

CHAPTER 5

5.1. We Are Tomodachi. Credit: Government of Japan.

5.2. Abenomics is progressing. Credit: Government of Japan.

CHAPTER 6

6.1. Screen shot of promotional video. Public domain.

6.2. Ukraine promotional brochure. Public domain.

CHAPTER 7

7.1. OCS Scorecard. Author’s creation.

7.2. Results table. Author’s creation.

7.3. Evolution of scorecard. Author’s creation.

7.4. Broadcast chart. Author’s creation.

7.5. Tone chart. Author’s creation.

7.6. Programs table. Author’s creation.

7.7. Subject listing. Author’s creation.

CHAPTER 8

8.1. Results chart. Used with permission of John McLaren, AkzoNobel.

8.2. Analysis chart. Used with permission of Reputation Dividend Ltd. ← x | xi →

CHAPTER 9

9.1. Target publics table. Author’s creation.

9.2. The Stoner Sloth digital campaign featuring a human-size slow-moving sloth and the theme “You’re worse on weed”. Public domain.

9.3. Media metrics including impressions, views, cost per view, likes, comments, and shares (Universal McCann, 2016).

9.4. Messages recalled by 14–18-year-olds in NSW following the Stoner Sloth campaign (JWS, 2016).

9.5. Key messages about the potential negative consequences of Cannabis use pre- and post-campaign (JWS, 2016, p. 8).

CHAPTER 10

10.1. Publics and key messages. Author’s creation.

10.2. Airlines replace logos with black-and-white versions after crisis. Public domain. Source: Facebook posting retrieved from https://www.facebook.com/Germanwings4u9525/.

10.3. Screenshot of indeepsorrow.com website, including geo-tagged statements. Public domain. Source: www.indeepsorrow.com.

CHAPTER 11

11.1. Ebola awareness cartoon for children. Public domain, courtesy of PabioStone foundation.

11.2. Table of tactics. Author’s creation.

11.3. Budget table. Author’s creation. Source: Pamella Oder and Toluwani Oloke, personal communication.

11.4. Community residents listening to campaign messages from AU-ASEOWA staff in Grand Cape Mount community. Author’s creation.

CHAPTER 12

12.1. Yes Equality Campaigners, posing in Grafton Street, Dublin, with “their” posters, which were released by the campaign the week before voting day. Credit: Sharpix, Yes Equality, Dublin 2015. ← xi | xii →

12.2. On Dublin’s Grafton Street, receiving the 500,000th Yes Equality badge from Brian Sheehan, Chief Executive of GLEN and Grainne Healy, Chairperson of Marriage Equality, was 85-year-old Mr. Vivian Sheehan of Castletownbere, Co Cork (no relation). Credit: Sharpix, Yes Equality, Dublin 2015.

CHAPTER 13

13.1. Social media strategy. Author’s creation.

13.2. Table of activities. Author’s creation.

CHAPTER 15

15.1. Screen shot images. Public domain.

CHAPTER 16

16.1. QUEM SOMOS—Bayer Jovens, screen shot image from website. Used with permission from Bayer.

16.2. INOVAÇÃO—Bayer Jovens, screen shot image from website. Used with permission from Bayer.

CHAPTER 17

17.1. The Independent integrated agency, flow chart for project. Credit: UAE Space Agency.

17.2. Space entrance. Photo courtesy of UAE Space Agency.

CHAPTER 18

18.1. Colleagues enjoying a meal together. Credit: A Taste of Harmony

18.2. Chef Guy Grossi enjoying a meal with event attendees. Credit: A Taste of Harmony.

| xiii →

Introduction FROM THE Editors

There have been recent and very worthwhile initiatives such as PR Redefined and FuturePRoof, two recent, separate crowd-sourced initiatives with public relations practitioners from several countries, have looked at the role played by public relations in today’s society. But at its core, the mandate of public relations remains one that builds and sustains strong relationships between an organization and its publics, and in doing so, contributes to the betterment of society.

As public relations has become a global profession, relationships have expanded across every continent, region and country in the world. The literature of public relations, particularly case studies highlighting best practices from different parts of the world, has lagged behind this globalization of public relations. The two editors of this collection of case studies, during our travels around the globe, have heard from professors and students of public relations—as well as practitioners—in numerous countries outside North America that there is a lack of “best practices” case studies involving organizations from regions other than North America.

As in the first edition of this book, we wanted in this new edition to address that shortcoming and provide examples of best practices from around the world. Our motivation as editors is to source cases from around the world that demonstrate excellence and contribute to the public relations body of knowledge. As co-editors, we share in recruitment and selection of cases, editing duties and project management on an equal footing. That is why we are listed alphabetically as co-editors.

Both of us are or have been leaders in the Global Alliance for Public Relations and Communication Management (GA), http://www.globalalliancepr.org, a confederation of more than 70 professional societies and associations in ← xiii | xiv → public relations and communication management which has initiated several global initiatives including the Global Body of Knowledge and Capabilities project, the Melbourne Mandate and Stockholm Accords, and a Global Code of Ethics, all of which now provide a global professional beacon for public relations practice. Throughout our global involvement, we have learned of award-winning cases in various countries, many of them unique and transformative cases with the power to shape society and improve lives.

For this second edition, we sought both unique and award-winning public relations cases from around the world that met our criteria of excellence (or in some cases highlighted “reverse” excellence, what not to do), innovation and creativity. Based on our collective experience, we selected 18 cases, some global in scope and others implemented in a given country, which we think are deserving of being shared. Readers will note that a majority of cases follow a typical case study format suggested by the editors. But a few exceptional cases were best presented in somewhat adjusted formats. Most cases won national or international awards; all are current even in today’s fast-paced society. Furthermore, we think they reflect the variety of activities in managing public relations and how public relations is practiced in different parts of the globe. We are excited that we can make them available to scholars, practitioners and students at an affordable price point.

In the following pages, readers will find case studies about global brands such as Volkswagen, Cargill, Bayer and Lufthansa and issues addressed by governments. There also are cases that focus on industry initiatives, crisis communication, social justice, sustainability, social media, cultural diversity, measuring the effectiveness of public relations and country-to-country initiatives in public diplomacy.

Here is a very brief snapshot of the cases covered in the book:

How elements of the theoretically developed “excellence model” of public relations could be used analyze the Volkswagen diesel emissions defeat device and the company’s attempts to restore its reputation

How a local wine producer in Chile created a truly global brand

How Cargill demonstrated sensitivity to environmental issues surrounding the growth and production of palm oil in Indonesia

How Italy instilled pride in everything “Made in Italy” while enhancing business and consumer relationships during the World Expo 2015

How Japan restored a tarnished economic reputation through public diplomacy

How Ukraine responded after being invaded by Russia and the Euromaidan to restore confidence and how its response had a positive effect on the citizens of Ukraine ← xiv | xv →

How Atlantic City used systematic measurement tools to evaluate its communications during a multi-year effort to bring tourists back to Atlantic City after Hurricane Sandy

How Zurich Insurance tracked and measured its reputation on a corporate level and how AkzoNobel evaluated the impact of its corporate reputation on brand success

How the Australian government measured the effect of a campaign against the use of cannabis

How the African Union Commission responded to the Ebola virus epidemic

How Lufthansa responded #indeepsorrow to the crash of Germanwings flight 4U9525

How the campaign for marriage equality in Ireland illustrated the dynamics of a social justice issue

How Kuwait used multilingual and multicultural tactics in its campaign to promote safety in food preparation and handling

How Mead Johnson provided medical support and special infant formula to children with a condition called Phenylketonuria (PKU) in rural areas in China

How Malaysia’s straightforward communication won public acceptance of its introduction of a new consumer tax

How Bayer Jovens bolstered confidence in a global brand in Brazil through a youth education campaign

How the United Emirates introduced the world to its new space agency

How Australia celebrated cultural diversity through food to celebrate differences and enhance social harmony

Case studies can be powerful teaching tools of public relations principles in action for both students and practitioners. They can bring to life theoretical frameworks. They can illustrate the role of public relations practitioners in achieving objectives. And they make the vital link between applied theory taught in classrooms to projects and campaigns such as those selected for this book.

This book’s strengths are its global emphasis and our choice of cases that illustrate public relations practices in different countries and in various cultural, economic and even political systems. Furthermore, the case studies provide examples of best practices for practitioners and for educating graduate and undergraduate students all over the world: in Asia, Africa, Oceania, South America, Europe and North America. Together, the cases illustrate how the practice of public relations has evolved globally, is being increasingly practiced with two-way symmetrical characteristics and no longer imposes a universal “one size fits all” approach to global public relations practice. ← xv | xvi →

We hope that through these cases, readers will be able to better appreciate how public relations is practiced around the world and gain insights into how the profession is evolving.

We are immensely grateful to the contributing authors and to the organizational representatives who provided information for these case studies. We also are grateful for the support and encouragement of the Global Alliance for Public Relations and Communication Management for supporting our effort and for helping disseminate information about our book to the global public relations community.

Judy VanSlyke Turk PhD, APR, Fellow PRSA
jvturk@vcu.edu

Jean Valin APR, Fellow CPRS, Honorary CIPR Fellow
jvalinpr@gmail.com

| xvii →

Foreword

What Case Studies Can Teach us in International Public Relations

Public relations scholarship—applied and basic—is bountiful these days. Every published thought is exposed to more rigorous comparison and to more diverse audiences than ever before. This, in turn, forces scholars and reflective practitioners to eke out the specific merit of their every contribution relative to prior published thought. This is good for the practice and the academy.

Details

Pages
XX, 386
Year
2017
ISBN (PDF)
9781433145513
ISBN (ePUB)
9781433145520
ISBN (MOBI)
9781433145537
ISBN (Hardcover)
9781433145544
ISBN (Softcover)
9781433134548
DOI
10.3726/b11746
Language
English
Publication date
2017 (August)
Keywords
tourism organizational communication fundraising public diplomacy diplomacy
Published
New York, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, Frankfurt am Main, Oxford, Wien, 2017. XX, 386 pp.

Biographical notes

Judy VanSlyke Turk (Volume editor) Jean Valin (Volume editor)

Judy VanSlyke Turk is a professor emerita in the Richard T. Robertson School of Media and Culture at Virginia Commonwealth University. She received the Pathfinder Award in 2005 from the Institute of Public Relations in recognition of lifetime research and publications, the Educator Mentorship Award from the Plank Center for Public Relations Leadership in 2013, and was named Educator of the Year by the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) in 1992. Jean Valin, APR, Fellow CPRS, Honorary Fellow CIPR, is Principal at Valin Strategic Communications in Chelsea, Canada, and a founding member of the Global Alliance for Public Relations and Communication Management. He has received several awards, among them the David Ferguson Award for Outstanding Contributions to Public Relations Education from the Educators Academy of the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) and the President’s medal from the Chartered Institute of Public Relations in the United Kingdom. In 2013–2014 he was co-chair of the Commission on Public Relations Education. He has led several global projects that resulted in the adoption of global standards for public relations.

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Title: Public Relations Case Studies from Around the World (2nd Edition)