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Paris in Architecture, Literature, and Art

by May Spangler (Author)
Textbook XX, 410 Pages

Summary

Paris in Architecture, Literature, and Art is a textbook in cultural studies that capitalizes on the little exposure liberal arts students have to architecture and the widespread popularity of Paris across the curriculum. Designed for a college course in the humanities, the textbook is also suitable for a high school course or a study abroad program in Paris.
The book focuses on Paris, which throughout history has been the stage and experimental ground for artists and intellectuals from all over the world, making it the crucible of Western thought and consummate material for an interdisciplinary study. Each chapter presents a cultural movement such as the Gothic, classical, romantic, and modern that are predominant in the Parisian landscape. The interdisciplinary approach promotes critical thinking, inspiring students to identify and translate esthetic concepts from one discipline to another, and explore, for instance, what impressionist literature or cubist architecture might be.
A complimentary teacher's manual e-book is available with purchase.

Table Of Content

  • Cover
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • About the author(s)/editor(s)
  • About the book
  • This eBook can be cited
  • Contents
  • Illustrations
  • 1. Walls of Paris
  • 1.1 Rive Droite and Rive Gauche: Anthony Sutcliffe, The Autumn of Central Paris, 1970
  • 1.2 Gallo-Roman Lutetia, 52 BC–4C
  • 1.2.1 River and Marsh of Lutetia: Gaius Julius Caesar, The Conquest of Gaul, 59–44 BC
  • 1.2.2 Cardo Maximus in Orthogonal Lutetia, 2–4C
  • 1.2.3 Roman and Gallic Cohabitation: Lutetia in Astérix, 1962–1972
  • 1.3 Christianity in Paris: Figuring the Invisible
  • 1.3.1 Saint Denis the Cephalophore: Jacobus de Voragine, The Golden Legend or Lives of the Saints, 1275
  • 1.3.2 Literal and Figural Walls: Moine Yves, Life of Saint Denis, 1317
  • 1.4 Barbarian Invasions: Geneviève, Clotilde and Clovis, c.500
  • 1.4.1 Geneviève, Guardian of the Walls: Life of Sainte Geneviève, 520
  • 1.4.2 Clovis, First Catholic King of France
  • 1.5 Medieval Paris: Philippe Auguste and Charles V Walls, 1213 and 1383
  • 1.5.1 The New King Enters the City
  • 1.5.2 Allegories of the Garden Wall: Guillaume de Lorris, The Romance of the Rose, 1237–75
  • 1.6 Classical and Modern Paris: From Walls to Boulevards and Périphérique
  • 1.6.1 Expanding to the West: Louis XIII Wall of the Fossés Jaunes, 1634; Mathieu Merian, Le Plan de la Ville, 1615
  • 1.6.2 Unpopular 18C Farmers-General Wall, 1784–91: Maurice-Antoine Moithey, Plan des enceintes de Paris, 1787
  • 1.6.3 Haussmann’s 19C Restructuration of Paris: Edouard Dumas Vorzet, Paris and Its Surroundings, 1878
  • 1.6.4 Modern Paris and Beyond
  • 2. Gothic Paris: Notre-Dame and the Île de la Cité
  • 2.1 The Gothic Experience of Light
  • 2.1.1 What Is an Esthetic Experience?
  • 2.1.2 The Anagogical Path to Light: Abbot Suger, On What Was Done During His Administration, 1144–48
  • 2.1.3 Flexible Gothic Arch: Sir Banister Fletcher, A History of Architecture on the Comparative Method, 1896
  • 2.2 Île de la Cité, East Side: Religious Power
  • 2.2.1 Gothic Notre-Dame (1163–1245)
  • 2.2.2 Comparison of Romanesque Saint-Germain-des-Prés, 990–1014, and Gothic Notre-Dame, 1163–1245
  • 2.2.3 Notre-Dame’s Portal of the Last Judgment: Hoffbauer, Paris à travers les âges, 1998
  • 2.2.4 Rose Windows at Notre-Dame
  • 2.3 Abélard and Héloïse: To Teach and Punish
  • 2.4 Île de la Cité, West Side: Political Power
  • 2.5 Pissing the Parisians Off: François Rabelais, Gargantua, 1534
  • 3. Renaissance Paris: Wars of Religion and the Louvre
  • 3.1 Learning from Antiquity
  • 3.1.1 Perfected Beauty: Leone Battista Alberti, Ten Books on Architecture, 1452
  • 3.1.2 The Human Body, Model of Proportion: Leonardo da Vinci, The Vitruvian Man, 1487
  • 3.2 Renaissance Architecture: The Louvre, 13–20C
  • 3.2.1 Medieval Louvre: From Fortress to Castle, 13–14C
  • 3.2.2 From Medieval Castle to Renaissance Palace
  • 3.2.3 Henri IV and His Grand Dessein for the Louvre
  • 3.2.4 Louvre Outline, 13–20C
  • 3.3 Renaissance Literature: The Pléiade Poets
  • 3.3.1 Pierre de Ronsard, “Ode to Cassandre,” 1552
  • 3.3.2 Portrait of Ronsard and Cassandre, 1552
  • 3.3.3 Pierre de Ronsard, “On the Death of Marie,” 1578
  • 3.4 Wars of Religion: The Saint-Bartholomew Massacre, August 24, 1572
  • 3.4.1 Margot’s Dissolution: Patrice Chéreau, Queen Margot, 1994
  • 3.4.2 Architectural, Political and Anatomical Fragmentation: François Dubois, The Saint-Bartholomew Massacre, 1575–84
  • 3.4.3 Protestant and Catholic Reversible Bodies: Agrippa d’Aubigné, Les Tragiques, 1577–1616
  • 3.5 Henri IV and the Freedom of Conscience
  • 3.5.1 Le Bon Roi Henri
  • 3.5.2 Henri IV’s Program for a Renaissance Paris
  • 4. Classical Paris: Louis XIV and Versailles
  • 4.1 The Cogito in Perspective
  • 4.1.1 Clouds in Brunelleschi’s Experiment: Antonio Manetti, The Life of Brunelleschi, 1480
  • 4.1.2 Rationalism and Subjectivity: René Descartes, Discourse on Method, 1637
  • 4.2 Louis XIV and Absolutism
  • 4.2.1 Constructing the Image of a King: Roberto Rossellini, The Taking of Power by Louis XIV, 1966
  • 4.2.2 Louis XIV as the Sun King: Louis XIV, Memoirs for the Instruction of the Dauphin, 1662
  • 4.2.3 The King’s Two Bodies: Hyacinthe Rigaud, Louis XIV in Coronation Dress, 1701
  • 4.3 Louis XIV in Paris
  • 4.3.1 Perrault’s Colonnade, Model of French Classicism
  • 4.3.2 Unstable Center: Jules Hardouin-Mansart, Place Vendôme, 1699
  • 4.3.3 For His Veteran Soldiers: Libéral Bruant, Les Invalides, 1671–91, and Jules Hardouin Mansart, Dôme, 1708
  • 4.3.4 Gossiping as a Form of Knowledge: Madame de Sévigné, Letters, July 17, 1676
  • 4.4 Perspective on Versailles
  • 4.4.1 Enveloping a Hunting Castle: Louis Le Vau, Versailles, 1661–78
  • 4.4.2 Rationalist Baroque Lanscaping: André Le Nôtre, Versailles Gardens, 1661–70
  • 4.4.3 Lavish Baroque Palace within: Jules Hardouin-Mansart, Expansion of Versailles, 1678–1715
  • 4.4.4 The Disastrous Addition of Prestigious Hall of Mirrors
  • 4.4.5 The Crumbling Image of an Aging King: Jean de La Bruyère, The Characters, 1688–96
  • 5. Romantic Paris: Napoléon and the Arc de Triomphe
  • 5.1 The Empire of Napoléon I
  • 5.1.1 Napoléon and Joséphine: Abel Gance, Napoléon, 1927
  • 5.1.2 Napoléon and His Siblings
  • 5.1.3 Legitimizing a French Emperor: Jacques-Louis David, The Coronation of Napoléon, 1805–08
  • 5.1.4 Napoléon’s Cruciform Perspective: Anthony Sutcliffe, Paris, an Architectural History, 1993
  • 5.2 The Exalted and Melancholy Romantic Soul: Madame de Staël, Of Literature, 1800
  • 5.3 Romantic Art: The Call to Freedom. Eugène Delacroix, Liberty Leading the People, 1830
  • 5.4 Romantic Architecture: Ambition of Glory
  • 5.4.1 For the Grande Armée: Jean-Arnaud Raymond and Jean-François Chalgrin, Arc de Triomphe, 1806–36
  • 5.4.2 Aux Armes: François Rude, The Marseillaise, 1836
  • 5.4.3 The Anti-Hero: Eric Rohmer, “Place de l’Étoile,” in Six à Paris, 1965
  • 5.5 Romantic Literature: Gavroche Jumping Over Walls. Victor Hugo, Les Misérables, 1862
  • 6. Realism in Haussmann’s Paris
  • 6.1 The Second Empire
  • 6.1.1 Napoléon III and Efficacious Baron Haussmann
  • 6.1.2 Implementing an Emperor’s Vision; Baron Haussmann, Mémoires, 1890
  • 6.2 Realism in Literature: A Misery without Poetry. Honoré de Balzac, Old Goriot, 1834
  • 6.3 Realism in Art: Turning One’s Back on a Nude. Gustave Courbet, The Painter’s Studio, 1855
  • 6.4 Eclectic and Rationalist Architecture during the Second Empire
  • 6.4.1 For a Truthful Architecture: Eugène-Emmanuel Viollet-le-Duc, Dictionnaire raisonné, 1854
  • 6.4.2 A Frankly Revealed Structure: Henri Labrouste, the Bibliothèque Nationale, 1862–68
  • 6.4.3 Eclectic Architecture: Charles Garnier, the Opéra Garnier, 1861–74
  • 6.5 Paris under Construction
  • 6.5.1 Haussmann’s Ruthless Restructuration of Paris
  • 6.5.2 The Naturalist School: Paris Under Attack. Emile Zola, The Kill, 1872
  • 6.5.3 Paris as a Recumbent Bourgeoise: Edmond Morin, The City of Paris Invaded by Demolition Workers, 19C
  • 6.5.4 Artificial, yet Charming, Bois de Boulogne
  • 7. Impressionism and the Tour Eiffel
  • 7.1 Impressionism in Art: Modern Life in the Plein Air
  • 7.1.1 The Dismissed Message: Edouard Manet, The Luncheon on the Grass, 1863
  • 7.1.2 Incognito Flâneur at the Gare Saint-Lazare: Gustave Caillebotte, On the Pont de l’Europe, 1880
  • 7.1.3 Shapeless Strokes and Extreme Perspective: Claude Monet, Impression, Sunrise, 1874
  • 7.1.4 In the Deluge of the Plein Air: Stéphane Mallarmé, “The Impressionists and Edouard Manet,” 1876
  • 7.2 Impressionist Literature: The Beholder’s Individual Impression
  • 7.2.1 Literary Tableaux: Emile Zola, The Human Beast, 1890
  • 7.2.2 Machine-Produced Clouds: Jean Renoir, La Bête humaine, 1938
  • 7.3 Universal Expositions
  • 7.3.1 The Committee of the Three Hundred: Norma Evenson, Paris: A Century of Change 1878–1978, 1979
  • 7.3.2 Promenade along the Seine: Universal Expositions
  • 7.3.3 Art Nouveau’s Dragonflies and Lilies: Hector Guimard, Metro Stations Entrances, 1900
  • 7.4 Impressionist Architecture: The Ultimate Plein Air Building
  • 7.4.1 Elusive and Scandalous Tour Eiffel: Roland Barthes, The Eiffel Tower and other Mythologies, 1957
  • 7.4.2 A Bridge to the Sky: Georges Seurat, The Eiffel Tower, 1889
  • 8. Cubism and Modern Architecture in Paris
  • 8.1 Cubism in Art: Incorporating Time
  • 8.1.1 An Art of Conception: Guillaume Apollinaire, “Modern Painting,” 1913
  • 8.1.2 Unfolding Geometric Surfaces and Shifting Perspectives: Pablo Picasso, Portrait of Ambroise Vollard, 1910, and Violin, 1914
  • 8.1.3 Clouds Descending on the City: Robert Delaunay, The City of Paris, 1912
  • 8.2 Cubism in Literature: Disregarding Boundaries
  • 8.2.1 Guillaume Apollinaire, Windows, 1912
  • 8.2.2 Guillaume Apollinaire, Calligram of the Tour Eiffel, 1918
  • 8.3 Modern Architecture: From Masonry Wall to Reinforced Concrete Frame
  • 8.3.1 Exposing Concrete: Auguste Perret, Apartments at 25b, Rue Franklin, 1904
  • 8.3.2 The Power to Move: Le Corbusier, Towards a New Architecture, 1927
  • 8.3.3 Free Plan and Free Facade: Le Corbusier, “The Five Points of a New Architecture,” 1926
  • 8.3.4 Cubist Man in Movement: Le Corbusier, The Modulor, 1938–48
  • 8.3.5 Architectural Promenade: Le Corbusier, Villas La Roche-Jeanneret, 1923–25
  • 8.4 Cubist Architecture: Le Corbusier, The Villa Savoye, 1928–31
  • 9. Beaubourg and Postmodern Paris
  • 9.1 What Is Postmodernism? Jean-François Lyotard, The Postmodern Condition, 1979
  • 9.2 Sixties and Seventies: Disillusion with Modernism
  • 9.2.1 Reaffirming France’s Prestige: Charles de Gaulle, Complete War Memoirs 1940–1946 (1954)
  • 9.2.2 Against a Manhattanization of Paris: Louis Chevalier, The Assassination of Paris, 1977
  • 9.2.3 The Tired Hero of Modern Life: Jean Rouch, “Gare du Nord,” in Six à Paris, 1965
  • 9.2.4 Surrealist Siren of the Seine: André Breton, “Pont Neuf,” 1950
  • 9.2.5 Nostalgia for a Pre-modern Paris: Woody Allen, Midnight in Paris, 2011
  • 9.3 Postmodern Paris: The Beaubourg Provocation
  • 9.3.1 Architecture as a Language: Charles Jencks, The Language of Post-Modern Architecture, 1977
  • 9.3.2 Postmodernism in Beaubourg: Renzo Piano and Richard Rogers, Beaubourg/Pompidou Center, 1977
  • 9.3.3 Beaubourg the Cyborg: Sergio Birga, Main Basse sur la ville, 1976
  • 9.3.4 Beaubourg the Extra-terrestrial: Georges Pérec, “Tout autour de Beaubourg,” 1981
  • 10. Grands Travaux and Beyond
  • 10.1 The Mitterrand Years: Reviving the Monarch-Builder Tradition
  • 10.2 Grands Travaux on the Axe historique: Neomodern Monumentality
  • 10.2.1 Cube and Clouds: Johan Otto von Spreckelsen, Grande Arche de la Défense, 1989
  • 10.2.2 The Grande Arche Paradigm: Seloua Luste Boulbina, Grands Travaux à Paris: 1981–1995, 2007
  • 10.2.3 From Palace to Museum: The Grand Louvre, 1989
  • 10.2.4 A Sovereign Act: Jack Lang, Dictionnaire amoureux de François Mitterrand, 2015
  • 10.2.5 An Archaic Novelty: Ieoh Ming Pei, Pyramide du Louvre, 1989
  • 10.3 Grands Travaux at the East: Spreading Culture
  • 10.3.1 A Monument for Paris Rive Gauche: Dominique Perrault, Bibliothèque Nationale de France, 1997
  • 10.3.2 Transparency in Question: Anthony Vidler, The Architectural Uncanny, 1999
  • 10.3.3 Promenade: The Bercy Quarter
  • 10.4 On the Margin
  • 10.4.1 Underprivileged Banlieue
  • 10.4.2 Inhospitable Périphérique: Parc de la Villette, 1986–2015
  • 10.4.3 Angry with No Job and a Gun: Mathieu Kassovitz, Hate, 1995
  • 10.4.4 For a Beurette Literature: Faïza Guène, Kiffe Kiffe Tomorrow, 2004
  • Illustration Credits

| xiii →

Chapter 1: Walls of Paris

Fig. 1.1. Gallo-Roman Lutetia, 2–4C

Fig. 1.2. Goscinny and Uderzo, Lutetia in La Serpe d’or, 1962

Fig. 1.3. Goscinny and Uderzo, Lutetia in Les Lauriers de César, 1972

Fig. 1.4. Moine Yves, The Conversion of Lisbius, in Life of Saint-Denis, 1317

Fig. 1.5. Baptism of Clovis, in Grandes Chroniques de France, 1380

Fig. 1.6. De la Mare, Lutèce conquise par les François, 1705

Fig. 1.7. Braun, View of Paris in 1530, 1572

Fig. 1.8. Fouquet, John the Good Entering the Capital in 1350, 1460

Fig. 1.9. Fouquet, Charles V Entering the Capital in 1364, 1460

Fig. 1.10. Merian, Le Plan de la ville, 1615

Fig. 1.11. Moithey, Plan des enceintes de Paris, 1787

Fig. 1.12. APUR, Enquête sur les tissus urbains, 2001

Fig. 1.13. Concentric Boulevards on the former city walls

Fig. 1.14. New Loops bypassing Paris: Super-Périphérique and Francilienne ← xiii | xiv →

Chapter 2: Gothic Paris: Notre-Dame and the Île de la Cité

Fig. 2.1. Saint-Julien-le-Pauvre, 1170

Fig. 2.2. Hôtel de Cluny, 1485–98

Fig. 2.3. Thermes de Cluny, 3C, and Hôtel de Cluny, 1485–98: plan

Fig. 2.4. Tour Saint-Jacques, 1523

Fig. 2.5. Suger’s partial transformation of the Carolingian Saint-Denis Basilica, 1135–44

Fig. 2.6. Suger, Saint-Denis Basilica: doors at the west

Fig. 2.7. Suger, Saint-Denis Basilica: ribbed vaults in double ambulatory

Fig. 2.8. Suger, Saint-Denis Basilica: nave and stained-glass windows

Fig. 2.9. Suger, Saint-Denis Basilica: Paul unveils Moses’ law

Fig. 2.10. Notre-Dame: section through the nave

Fig. 2.11. Romanesque and Gothic vaulting systems

Fig. 2.12. Île de la Cité, 14C

Fig. 2.13. Fouquet, Right Hand of God Driving Out Demons, in Hours of Étienne Chevalier, 1452–60

Fig. 2.14. Notre-Dame, west facade, 1200–50

Fig. 2.15. Saint-Germain-des-Prés, 990–1014, and Notre-Dame, 1163–1245

Fig. 2.16. Notre-Dame: central portal of the Last Judgment, west facade, 1225

Fig. 2.17. Notre-Dame central portal, embrasure: vices and virtues

Fig. 2.18. Notre-Dame central portal, trumeau: teaching Jesus

Fig. 2.19. Notre-Dame central portal, archivolt to the left: Heaven with the three patriarchs

Fig. 2.20. Notre-Dame central portal, archivolt to the right: Hell

Fig. 2.21. Notre-Dame central portal, apex of tympanum: Christ in glory

Fig. 2.22. Notre-Dame central portal, middle lintel of tympanum: the trial

Fig. 2.23. Notre-Dame central portal, lower lintel of tympanum: call to judgment

Fig. 2.24. Detail of the trial: Notre-Dame Woman in the scale

Fig. 2.25. Saint-Michel, Lacroix, Voillat, The Golden Moments of Notre-Dame de Paris, 2006

Fig. 2.26. Notre-Dame west rose window, outside view

Fig. 2.27. Notre-Dame west rose window, inside view ← xiv | xv →

Fig. 2.28. Abélard and Héloïse, illumination from a 14C manuscript of Le Roman de la Rose

Fig. 2.29. Sainte-Chapelle, 1248: lower and upper chapel plans

Fig. 2.30. Sainte-Chapelle: outside view

Fig. 2.31. Sainte Chapelle: inside view

Fig. 2.32. Philippe le Bel, plan of Palais de la Cité, 1313

Fig. 2.33. Conciergerie today

Fig. 2.34. Limbourg Brothers, Month of June, in The Very Rich Hours of the Duke of Berry, ca. 1440

Chapter 3: Renaissance Paris: Wars of Religion and the Louvre

Fig. 3.1. Boccador, Hôtel de Ville, 1533, additions 1835, rebuilt 1892

Fig. 3.2. Saint-Eustache Church, 1540

Fig. 3.3. Du Cerceau, Hôtel de Sully, 1625–29

Fig. 3.4. De Brosse, Palais du Luxembourg, 1615–30

Fig. 3.5. Lemercier, Palais-Royal, 1639

Fig. 3.6. The Three Orders of Architecture

Fig. 3.7. Da Vinci, The Vitruvian Man, ca. 1490

Fig. 3.8. Louvre Fortress of Philippe Auguste, 1190–1202

Fig. 3.9. Louvre Castle of Charles V, 1380

Fig. 3.10. Lescot, southwest wing of the Cour Carrée, 1546–51

Fig. 3.11. Lescot, southwest wing of the Cour Carrée, 1546–51

Fig. 3.12. Lescot and Goujon, Fontaine des Innocents, 1550

Fig. 3.13. Lescot and Goujon, detail of the Fontaine des Innocents

Fig. 3.14. The Louvre under Henri IV

Fig. 3.15. Plan of 21C Louvre

Fig. 3.16. Mellan, Ronsard and Cassandra Salviati, 1552

Fig. 3.17. Dubois, The Saint-Bartholomew Massacre, 1575–84

Fig. 3.18. Place des Vosges, 1612: King Pavilion

Fig. 3.19. Place des Vosges, 1612: houses of four bays each

Fig. 3.20. Place des Vosges, 1612: steep roof with black slates

Fig. 3.21. Pont Neuf and round refuges, 1607

Fig. 3.22. Place Dauphine: careless renovation of original 1607 houses ← xv | xvi →

Chapter 4: Classical Paris: Louis XIV and Versailles

Fig. 4.1. Blondel, Porte Saint-Denis, 1674

Fig. 4.2. Hardouin-Mansart, Place des Victoires, 1685

Fig. 4.3. Soufflot, Panthéon, 1757–90

Fig. 4.4. Ledoux, Parc Monceau Tollhouse, 1785–91

Fig. 4.5. Brunelleschi’s perspective experiment, 1415

Fig. 4.6. Adaptation of Da Vinci’s The Last Supper, 1498: one-point perspective

Fig. 4.7. Rigaud, Louis XIV in Coronation Dress, 1701

Fig. 4.8. Perrault, Colonnade du Louvre, east facade, 1670

Fig. 4.9. Hardouin-Mansart, octagonal Place Vendôme, 1699

Fig. 4.10. Hardouin-Mansart, tripartite facade on the Place Vendôme, 1699

Fig. 4.11. Axonometric view of the Invalides by Bruant, 1671–91, with Hardouin-Mansart’s dome behind, 1708

Fig. 4.12. Le Vau, Versailles addition of 1662

Fig. 4.13. Le Vau, Versailles envelope, 1669

Fig. 4.14. Palais de Versailles: Marble courtyard

Fig. 4.15. Palais de Versailles: Apollo Fountain

Fig. 4.16. Palais de Versailles: Le Nôtre classical garden

Fig. 4.17. Le Nôtre, Versailles Gardens, 1705: plan

Fig. 4.18. Hardouin-Mansart, Versailles, addition of the Hall of Mirrors, 1680

Fig. 4.19. Palais de Versailles: balustrade in the king’s bedroom

Fig. 4.20. Palais de Versailles: Queen Staircase trompe-l’œil panel

Fig. 4.21. Palais de Versailles: Salon of Plenty

Fig. 4.22. Palais de Versailles: Hall of Mirrors

Fig. 4.23. Hardouin-Mansart, addition of the Hall of Mirrors, 1687

Chapter 5: Romantic Paris: Napoleon and the Arc de Triomphe

Fig. 5.1. David, The Coronation of Napoleon, 1805–08

Fig. 5.2. Map of Paris: Napoléon’s Cruciform Perspective

Fig. 5.3. Place de la Concorde: Hôtel de la Marine, 1775, and Obélisque

Fig. 5.4. Percier and Fontaine, Arc du Carrousel, 1806 ← xvi | xvii →

Fig. 5.5. Raymond and Chalgrin, Arc de Triomphe, 1806–36

Fig. 5.6. Vignon, La Madeleine, 1806–42

Fig. 5.7. Poyet, Assemblée Nationale, 1807

Fig. 5.8. Delacroix, Liberty Leading the People, 1830

Fig. 5.9. Rude, La Marseillaise, 1836

Chapter 6: Realism in Haussmann’s Paris

Fig. 6.1. Courbet, The Painter’s Studio, 1855

Fig. 6.2. Labrouste, Bibliothèque Nationale, 1868, plan of the reading room

Fig. 6.3. Labrouste, Bibliothèque Nationale, inside view of the reading room

Fig. 6.4. Baltard, Les Halles, 1852–66

Fig. 6.5. Garnier, Opéra, 1861–74: plan

Fig. 6.6. Garnier, Opéra, 1861–74: facade

Fig. 6.7. Diagram of Haussmann’s networks of roads and plazas

Fig. 6.8. Hittorff, Place de l’Étoile in the shape of a star

Fig. 6.9. Map of the administrative limits of Paris after 1859, with Haussmann’s division into twenty arrondissements

Fig. 6.10. Morin, The City of Paris Invaded by Demolition Workers, 19C

Fig. 6.11. Alphand, Bois de Boulogne, 1852–58

Chapter 7: Impressionism and the Tour Eiffel

Fig. 7.1 Abadie, Sacré-Cœur, 1875–1919: facade

Fig. 7.2 Abadie, Sacré-Cœur: plan

Fig. 7.3. Eiffel, Tour Eiffel, 1889

Fig. 7.4. Résal and Alby, Pont Alexandre III, 1900

Fig. 7.5. Deglane, Louvet and Thomas, Grand Palais, and Girault, Petit Palais, 1900

Fig. 7.6. Manet, The Luncheon on the Grass, 1863

Details

Pages
XX, 410
ISBN (PDF)
9781433139598
ISBN (ePUB)
9781433139604
ISBN (MOBI)
9781433139611
ISBN (Hardcover)
9781433139581
ISBN (Softcover)
9781433135354
Language
English
Publication date
2018 (June)
Published
New York, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, Vienna, Oxford, Wien, 2018. XX, 410 pp., 101 b/w ill., 95 col. ill.

Biographical notes

May Spangler (Author)

May Peyron Spangler was born and raised in Paris, where she graduated with a master’s degree in architecture from the École des Beaux-Arts. She also received a Ph.D. in French at Emory University in Atlanta, where she taught for eleven years. Her publications include critical essays and short stories combining her interest in literature and architecture, and she is the author of a novel published in 2016, Papa a dit, Maman aussi.

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Title: Paris in Architecture, Literature, and Art