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Creative Industries in Turkey

by Tolga Hepdincler (Volume editor) Hasan Kemal Süher (Volume editor)
Edited Collection 320 Pages

Summary

This book proposes to define different aspects of the creative industry in Turkey , which have created surplus value with the contribution of innovative initiatives and technological developments in recent years. It concentrates on video games, cinema, animation, and creative activities that have gained economic and cultural importance in recent years. Also, it focuses on the unique cases of the core creative industries, such as new media. In more detail, it provides a critical and alternative approach to the production, distribution, and use of creative industry content beyond the overview of these industries.

Table Of Contents

  • Cover
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • About the editors
  • About the book
  • This eBook can be cited
  • Table of Contents
  • List of Abbreviations
  • Foreword
  • An Introduction to the Main Concepts of Creative Industries (Şafak Şahin)
  • Chapter 1 Investigation of Gamification and Its Effects on Marketing in Turkey (Çakır Aker)
  • Chapter 2 It Is So Good, It Cannot Be Turkish: A Case Study of Local Video Game Producers versus Local Gamer Communities (Sercan Şengün, Güven Çatak, and Mustafa Feyyaz Sonbudak)
  • Chapter 3 The Evolution of Role-Playing Game Communities in Turkey and Their Effects on Creative Industries (Ertuğrul Süngü, Barbaros Bostan)
  • Chapter 4 The Recent Horror Film Boom in the Cinema of Turkey (Kaya Özkaracalar)
  • Chapter 5 A Market on the Rise and “The Fall”: The Distribution in the Turkish Film Industry (Tolga Hepdinçler, Tuna Tetik)
  • Chapter 6 The Flora of Film Festivals in Istanbul: From Mainstream to Counter-Festivals (Funda Kaya)
  • Chapter 7 The Universe of Fashion Film in Turkey (Nilay Ulusoy)
  • Chapter 8 Women of Animation in Turkey: animasyonunkadinlari.org (Nazlı Eda Noyan)
  • Chapter 9 Dubbing as a Creative Industry in Turkey (Ömer Vatanartıran)
  • Chapter 10 Turkish Independent Music Industry in the Last Decade (Burak Tamer, Barkın Engin)
  • Chapter 11 Hip-Hop Culture in Turkey (Ali Çağıl Ömerbaş)
  • Chapter 12 An Overall Picture of Creativity in Turkish Public Relations Industry (Idil Karademirlidağ Suher, Çisil Sohodol, and Nilüfer Geysi)
  • Chapter 13 Understanding Hallmark Events: Case of Şeb-i Arus (Burcu Eker Akgöz, Elif Engin)
  • Chapter 14 Digital News Media as a Creative Industry: Tracking the Changes of Content Production (Tirşe Erbaysal Filibeli, Sinan Aşçı, and Elif Cerrahoğlu)
  • Chapter 15 Virtual Reality as a Creative Industry and Its Progress in Turkey (Güven Çatak, Cenk Köknar, and Ecehan Akan)
  • List of Figures
  • List of Tables
  • Notes on Contributors

List of Abbreviations

2D:

Two dimensional

3D:

Three dimensional

AI:

Artificial Intelligence

API:

Application Programming Interface

AR:

Augmented reality

ASVOFF:

A Shaded View on Fashion Film

AVOD:

Audio/Video on Demand

AWAL:

Artists Without a Label

B2B:

Business to Business

BAU:

Bahçeşehir University

BFF:

Boğaziçi Film Festival

BKM:

Beşiktaş Cultural Center

CAVE:

Cave Automatic Virtual Environment

CEO:

Chief Executive Officer

CNN:

Cable News Network

DAW:

Digital Audio Workstation

DCMS:

Department for Culture, Media, and Sport

DJ:

Disc Jokey

DM:

Dungeon Master

DMC:

Doğan Music Company

DVD:

Digital Versatile Disc

CNBC-e:

Consumer New and Business Channel-Entertainment

EWA:

European Women’s Audiovisual Network

FF:

Film Festival

FIAPF:

International Federation of Film Producers Associations

FIFA:

International Federation of Association Football

FIPRESCI:

International Federation of Film Critics

FPS:

Frame-per-second

FRP:

Fantasy Role Playing

GM:

Game Master

GWA:

Golden Awards Excellence

HMD:

Head-Mounted Display

HR:

Human Resources

HTC:

Huawei Technologies, Co.

IAAF:

International Association of Athletics Federations

IDA:

Communication Consultancies Association of Turkey

IFPI:

International Federation of the Phonographic Industry

IIFF:

International Istanbul Film Festival

IKSV:

Istanbul Foundation for Culture and Arts

IPRA:

International Public Relations Association

ITFA:

International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam

KRS-ONE:

Knowledge Reigns Supreme over Nearly Everyone

LAN:

Local Area Network

LP:

Long Play

M4NM:

Music for Non-musicians

MC:

A Master Of Ceremonies

MESAM:

Musical Work Owners’ Society of Turkey

MIAM:

Centre for Advance Studies in Music

MR:

Mixed reality

MSG:

Musical Work Owners’ League of Turkey

MTV:

Music Television

MÜYAP:

Turkish Phonographic Industry Society

MÜYORBİR:

Association of Music Interpreters

NGO:

Nongovernmental Organization

NLTR:

News Lab Turkey

NTV:

Nergis Television

P2P:

Peer-to-Peer

PC:

Personal Computer

PCM:

Pulse Code Modulation

PR:

Public Relations

PSA:

Public Service Announcement

RIAA:

Recording Industry Association of America

RPG:

Role-Playing Game

RTÜK:

The Supreme Board of Radio and Television

SIYAD:

Film Critics Association

SPSS:

Statistical Package for the Social Sciences

SVOD:

Subscription Video on Demand

TRT:

Turkish Radio Television

TÜBİTAK:

Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey

TUHID:

Turkish Association of Public Relations

TURSAK:

Turkish Cinema and Audiovisual Culture Foundation

TV:

Television

UGC:

User-Generated Content

UIP:

United International Pictures

UK:

United Kingdom

UNCTAD:

United Nations Conference on Trade and Development

UNDP:

United Nations Development Programme

UNESCO:

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

USA:

United States of America

VFX:

Visual Effects

VMVPD:

Virtual Multi-channel Video Programming Distributors

VOD:

Video on Demand

VR:

Virtual Reality

VR1:

Virtual Reality First

WB:

Warner Bros.

WIA:

Women in Animation

WIPO:

World Intellectual Property Organization

YÖK:

Council of Higher Education

ZORLU PSM:

Zorlu Performing Arts Center

Tolga Hepdinçler

Foreword

Creative industries have become frequently expressed in academic studies in recent years. In the 2000s, new fields of study added to traditional media studies seem to require the adoption of the concept. In particular, the media transformed by new media technologies and the newly emerging areas of media applications difficult to define within the framework of the traditional media or cultural industries have required the use of creative industries as a new concept. On the other hand, cultural and artistic activities that are not included in the definitions of media have led to the use of the concept effectively in the last two decades. It is viable to say that the definitions of the creative industry are evaluated in different frameworks. If we make an evaluation in academic circles, Tab. 01 represents how creative industries are defined in different research areas such as creativity and content production (Pratt, 2004, 2008; Florida, 2010; Drake, 2003; Lazetti et al., 2008; Banks, 2010, McKinley & Smith 2009; Eikhof & Haunschild, 2006), creative economies (Howkins, 2001; Cave, 2002; Cunningham, 2002, 2008; Potts et al., 2008, Banks & Hesmondhalgh, 2009) and consumption of the creative contents (Deuze, 2007; Gill & Pratt, 2008; Evans, 2009; Shorthose, 2004). In this book, we tried to redefine and develop current definitions and debates in this framework.

Creative industries encompass a wide range of industrial activities covering film, television, broadcasting and advertising which are also traditional sectors of the media industries, as well as video games, design, music, visual arts, the UK’s Department of Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS), who first defined the field, added industrial areas such as architecture, the art and antiques market, crafts, interactive leisure software and fashion (DCMS, 2001). More recently, United Nations Development Programme and United Nations Conference on Trade and Development report on Creative Industries in 2010 defined a classification relies on enlarging the concept of “creativity” from activities having a strong artistic component to “any economic activity” producing symbolic products with a heavy reliance on intellectual property and for as wide a market as possible (UNDP & UNCTAD, 2010, p. 7). In this context, the report defines a classification of creative industries with their distinctive characteristics such as heritage, arts, media and functional creations.

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UNDP and UNCTAD have also set the benchmarks that are effective in identifying creative industries. The framework cited by the report is an important step in defining the boundaries of creative industries. Thus, it is a basic framework for understanding potential creative industries:

Details

Pages
320
ISBN (ePUB)
9783631823903
ISBN (MOBI)
9783631823910
ISBN (PDF)
9783631823897
ISBN (Softcover)
9783631811764
Language
English
Publication date
2020 (March)
Published
Berlin, Bern, Bruxelles, New York, Oxford, Warszawa, Wien, 2020. 320 pp., 32 fig. b/w, 23 tables.

Biographical notes

Tolga Hepdincler (Volume editor) Hasan Kemal Süher (Volume editor)

Tolga Hepdinçler is an assistant professor in the Communication Design Department at Bahcesehir University, Turkey. He received his Ph.D. on film and television from Ankara University, Turkey, and worked at the same university as a research assistant between 1998 and 2001. He also directed short documentaries and received nominations and awards in many festivals. He is currently teaching several undergraduate courses on photography and video production and graduate courses on visual culture and memory studies. His research interests include contemporary photography, art history, visual culture, and European film studies. Hasan Kemal Suher is the dean of the communication faculty and the head of the department of advertising in Bahcesehir University, Turkey. Nowadays, he participates in congresses and continues his researches at national and international levels. He also manages some sectoral-based projects as a consultant.

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Title: Creative Industries in Turkey