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Measuring Change

Transformational Outcomes in Christian Education

by Jeremy M. Wallace (Author)
Monographs XVIII, 124 Pages
Series: American University Studies , Volume 359

Summary

Measuring Change provides voluminous data substantiating the claim that students can and do experience personal formation in the context of Christian higher education. This volume is a one-of-a-kind, mixed-methods analysis of Canby Bible College (CBC) alumnae. By means of a three-part research instrumentation, CBC graduates assess and articulate the transformational journey they gained as a Bible Collegian. Ultimately, Measuring Change contends that Christian education should be more about personal transformation than information acquisition, thus making a robust case for the wide-scale implementation of “transformational outcomes” in Christian higher education.

Table Of Contents

  • Cover
  • Title
  • Copyright
  • About the author
  • About the book
  • Advance Praise for Measuring Change
  • This eBook can be cited
  • Contents
  • List of Tables
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • Chapter One: Introduction
  • Background of the Study
  • Statement of the Problem
  • The Purpose of the Study
  • Research Questions
  • Significance of the Study
  • Limitations
  • Delimitations
  • Assumptions
  • Definition of Terms
  • Methodology
  • Summary
  • Notes
  • References
  • Chapter Two: Literature Review
  • Introduction
  • Transformation: A Biblical Precedent
  • Transformation: A Christian Priority
  • Transformation through Christian Education
  • Christian Education and the Uniqueness of Bible College
  • The Need to Measure Transformation in Christian Education
  • Summary
  • Notes
  • References
  • Chapter Three: Research Methodology
  • Ministry Context
  • Purpose of the Research
  • Research Questions
  • Participants
  • Research Method
  • Anonymity
  • Data Collection
  • Instrumentation Codification
  • Variables
  • Notes
  • References
  • Chapter Four: Presentation of Research Findings
  • Purpose of the Chapter
  • Research Findings
  • Note
  • Chapter Five: Summary and Conclusions
  • Strengths and Weaknesses
  • Implications for Ministry and Christian Education
  • Measurement in the Church and Academy
  • Christian Education as Fundamental in Disciple-Formation
  • Theological Reflections
  • Suggestions for Further Study
  • Final Summary
  • Notes
  • References
  • Appendixes

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Tables

 

Table 1.Quantitative Data: Questions 1–5 (In Percentage)
Table 2.Quantitative Data: Questions 6–10 (In Percentage)
Table 3.Quantitative Data: Questions 11–15 (In Percentage)
Table 4.Quantitative Data: Questions 16–20 (In Percentage)
Table 5.Quantitative Data: Questions 21–25 (In Percentage)
Table 6.Quantitative Data: Questions 26–30 (In Percentage) ← xi | xii →

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Preface

 

Nearly twenty-two years ago, I embarked upon undergraduate education at a major Christian university in the Midwest. It was a transformative experience for me. The substantial personal formation I underwent in those four years laid the foundation for who I am today and postured me to have enduring fruitfulness in pastoral ministry as well as academic life. After graduating from seminary and joining a pastoral staff at a church in Canby, Oregon, I began a new chapter in life, training and educating emerging leaders and aspiring ministers of the Gospel. Year after year, I saw a similar phenomenon of transformation consistently occurring within the graduates of our humble, two-year church-based Bible College. Lives were truly being transformed and equipped for a life of serving Jesus. After observing this for a handful of years, several questions began to pop into my mind: What happens to people through a Bible College experience to bring about such notable transformation in their life? Is Christian higher education more about information or transformation? Do Christian colleges and universities attempt to measure or quantify the transformative experiences of their graduates? What exactly should be the expectations of a so-called “Christian” college or university?

This work, Measuring Change, was produced in large part as an attempt to answer the aforementioned questions. I knew, personally, how much my life was transformed in a Bible College setting, and I knew that the same dynamic was occurring within the lives of Canby Bible College graduates. After I completed the ← xiii | xiv → course phase of my Doctor of Ministry program, I knew that for the dissertation phase, I wanted to explore the nature of transformation many students can and do have while in Bible College. Since my ministry context was Canby Bible College, I thought it was only natural and appropriate to do a self-study of our small Bible College to explore the nature of transformation occurring within it. This study is the first and only of its kind. I hope that as you read Measuring Change you not only find it enlightening, but encouraging.

Dr. Jeremy M. Wallace

Canby Bible College

Fall 2016

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Acknowledgments

 

There are several persons to whom I offer my deepest gratitude. First of all, I am grateful to God the Father, the Lord Jesus Christ, and the Holy Spirit—no one is more deserving of eternal gratitude and praise. You transform lives to the Glory of Your Name.

I also wish to thank my wife Rebeka, and especially our two daughters, Moriah and Selah. Your personal sacrifice, patience, support, and love has both enabled me to complete such an undertaking and inspired me throughout this transformative project. I love you very much.

I would also like to express my gratitude to my extended family. Your prayers, support, and encouragement have been greatly felt and appreciated.

Next, I want to thank Pastor Ron Swor, the pastoral staff, and the entire New Life Foursquare community. I have learned so much from you and have been shaped by your wisdom, love, and service. It has been a privilege to pastor at such a wonderful church.

The faculty, staff, students, and alumni of Canby Bible College deserve many thanks as well. You have aided me throughout this endeavor, and I simply would not have been able to complete this dissertation without you. I have been blessed to teach and serve the Lord alongside of you.

A number of godly academicians and mentors have also helped to shape my theology and character. Looking back over my personal development through ← xv | xvi → undergraduate, graduate, and now postgraduate studies, I am gratefully indebted to Dr. Don Vance, Dr. James Shelton, Pastor Bill Shuler, Pastor Ed Gunger, Dr. James Breckenridge, Dr. Gerry Breshears, and Bill Hull.

A final word of gratitude goes to Jason Yates, the late Bobbie Breedlove, and Karen Arvin for your editorial assistance and to my Faculty Advisor Rev. Dr. Charles W. Christian, for your friendship, guidance, and wisdom throughout this entire process. Your help is greatly appreciated.

Details

Pages
XVIII, 124
ISBN (PDF)
9781433138157
ISBN (ePUB)
9781433138164
ISBN (MOBI)
9781433138171
ISBN (Hardcover)
9781433138140
Language
English
Publication date
2017 (March)
Published
New York, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, Frankfurt am Main, Oxford, Wien, 2017. XVIII, 124 pp., 6 b/w tables

Biographical notes

Jeremy M. Wallace (Author)

An ordained minister in the Foursquare Church, Jeremy M. Wallace is Dean of Canby Bible College and Assisting Pastor at New Life Foursquare Church in Canby, Oregon. He received a Bachelor of Arts in Biblical literature and a Master of Divinity from Oral Roberts University (Tulsa, Oklahoma), as well as a Doctor of Ministry in ministerial leadership from Western Seminary (Portland, Oregon). Dr. Wallace is currently engaged in postdoctoral studies at South African Theological Seminary (Johannesburg) and is an active member in the Evangelical Theological Society, the Society for Pentecostal Studies, and the Foursquare Scholars Fellowship. Additionally, he is Adjunct Professor of Theology and Biblical Studies at Northwest University, Life Pacific College, and The King’s University. He and his wife Rebeka have three daughters and a son.

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